Wednesday September 19, 2018

Hydration, Regular Breakfast Give Sound Sleep

Here are top tips to help restless sleepers:

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Hydration
Be well hydrated during the day. Pixabay
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The festive season can be fun but also bring a lot of stress and sleeplessness. Don’t skip breakfast and drink as much water as possible to sleep well.

You may start worrying about finding the perfect gift for your loved ones or over too many party invitations, and such thoughts can have a negative impact on one’s sleep pattern.

Sleep expert Nerina Ramlakhan has shared advice on getting a good sleep this festive season, ensuring you wake up refreshed and energised when the big day arrives, reports femalefirst.co.uk.

She said: “Organising and preparing for any big day or important event can be a daunting task. With a never ending list of things to do and a head swirling with information and thoughts it can prove difficult for anyone to switch off at the end of the day.

“Throw in additional stresses and strains of daily life and sleeping through the night can prove even trickier than usual.

Here are top tips to help restless sleepers:

sleep
Sleep well. Pixabay

– Minimise electronic equipment in your room: It may be tempting to buy presents online or search the web for inspiration before you retire to the bedroom but avoid spending time on laptops and smartphones in the 60 to 90 minutes before bed if you want to look and feel refreshed the next morning.

– Don’t skip breakfast: While some of you may like to skip breakfast if you’re in a rush, this can have an adverse effect and actually affect your sleeping pattern. You need to eat healthily and avoid skipping breakfast. People who eat breakfast produce more melatonin and therefore, sleep better. Include protein in your breakfast for an even greater effect.

Also Read The Side Effects of Not Having Proper Sleep- Poor Sleep May Make it Harder to See Positive Side

– Be well hydrated during the day: Dehydration is a key cause of frequent waking or ‘shallow’ sleep. This will also keep you looking as well as feeling good, especially following your Christmas parties.

– Pen down your worries: Research shows that people who go to bed happy tend to sleep better. So deal with your worries before you put your head on the pillow. And if you can’t let those worries go then get up, go to another room and write down all the worries in your head on a piece of paper. Then go back to bed and get as comfortable as possible. (Bollywood Country)

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Losing Just 6 Hours of Sleep May Spike up Diabetes Risk: Study

During the sleep/wake period, the animals also had limited opportunity for physical activity

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Losing just 6 hrs of sleep may up diabetes risk
Losing just 6 hrs of sleep may up diabetes risk. Pixabay

Being deprived of sleep for just six hours or a single night may affect the liver’s ability to produce glucose and process insulin, increasing the risk of metabolic diseases such as fatty liver and Type-2 diabetes, warns a study.

Sleep deprivation has been associated with eating more, moving less and having a higher risk of developing Type-2 diabetes.

However, “it was not clear whether glucose intolerance was due to the changes in food intake or energy expenditure or to the sleep deprivation itself,” explained a team of researchers from Toho University in Japan.

In the study done over mice, blood glucose levels were found significantly higher in the sleep deprivation group than controls after one six-hour session of wakefulness.

Triglyceride (fat) levels and the production of glucose in the liver also increased in the sleep deprivation group after a single wake period.

Elevated liver triglycerides are associated with insulin resistance, or the inability of the body to process insulin properly.

Diabetes
Representational image. Pixabay

In addition, lack of sleep changed the expression of enzymes that regulate metabolism in the liver in the sleep deprivation group.

These findings suggest that “intervention studies designed to prevent sleep deprivation-induced hepatic steatosis and insulin resistance should be performed in the future,” the researchers noted.

For the study, published in the American Journal of Physiology — Endocrinology and Metabolism, the team examined two groups of mice.

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One group was kept awake for six hours each night (“sleep deprivation”), while the control group was allowed to sleep as desired.

The team offered unlimited high-fat food and sugar water — mimicking lifestyle-related food choices that people make — to both groups prior to the study.

During the sleep/wake period, the animals also had limited opportunity for physical activity. (IANS)

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