Tuesday August 20, 2019
Home India ‘I will...

‘I will surrender to the court tomorrow’: Digvijaya Singh on MP recruitment scam

0
//
Image source: youtube.com

New Delhi: Congress leader Digvijaya Singh, slammed with an arrest warrant issued in relation to the Madhya Pradesh recruitment scam against him by the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), is set to surrender to a local court today.

Singh believes there is no charge of corruption, and the arrest warrant is nothing but an agitated act by the BJP since he took up the VYAPAM scam.

In a series of tweets, the Congress leader tweeted in this regard:

The arrest warrant was issued against Singh after he failed to appear when the court summoned him for the hearing.

Singh is accused to be involved in the alleged recruitment scam at the Madhya Pradesh Assembly Secretariat in Bhopal between 1993 and 2003. He was the chief minister during that time.

Remaining assertive, Singh believes the Congress gave a loan to a “nonprofit company” National Herald which proved to be a significant reason behind the freedom movement founded by Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru. He further added that BJP shared its party funds in order to publish a newspaper with a “for profit” company, Shree Multimedia Vision Ltd (SMVL).

Dragging Mr Subramaniam Swamy into his tweet, he tweeted:

And also:

Singh hit out at the Centre, stating Vinod Tawde still continues to be the director as a minister in Maharashtra who is the chairman of the multi-media vision, a ‘for profit company’.

“He has violated the Code of Conduct for Ministers as prescribed by Ministry of Home Govt of India. Shouldn’t he resign?”

Undeterred about the event, the Congress leader said he would surrender today and the state police can arrest him if they want to:

“The Madhya Pradesh police can arrest me if they want. I will surrender to the court tomorrow. I was about to go to Delhi but I have cancelled that also and now I will go to Bhopal,” Singh said.

“This is a 22-year-old scam and it is inevitable that the state government, who is already worried about the Vyapam scam, will target me. In those appointments there was an order by the Cabinet and not alone of mine,” he added.

The Jahangirabad police in February last year filed a cased against Singh, former Speaker Sriniwas Tiwari and others for alleged forgery, conspiracy, cheating, and misuse of office as well as offences under the Prevention of Corruption Act. Accused in the case are many others, amounting to a total of 24 people at present.

The filing was the result of a complaint issued by the Assembly Secretariat after witnessing irregularities in recruitment between 1993 and 2003. ( Inputs from Agencies)

Next Story

Big Business and Politics Mass-Mining Everyday Data from Facebook Likes to Online Subscriptions

There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think

0
netflix
FILE - The Netflix logo is seen on their office in Hollywood, Los Angeles, California. VOA

Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released on Wednesday.

“The Great Hack” says personal data has surpassed oil as the world’s most valuable asset, and warns viewers that companies and governments are hacking into way more than computers.

“There are people out there who are trying to figure out how you think. If you don’t understand how you think, they will think for you,” said directors Karim Amer and Jehane Noujaim. “It’s not just our computers that have been hacked, it’s our minds,” they said in a statement.

The two-hour documentary — showing on the Netflix streaming video platform — examines the state of privacy in the United States and Europe, where people spend much of their time online, volunteering countless nuggets of exploitable information.

Business, Politics, Data
Big business and politics are mass-mining everyday data — from Facebook ‘likes’ to online subscriptions – for profit and power, according to a Netflix documentary released. Pixabay

It centers on the Cambridge Analytica affair, which saw an international consultancy target undecided voters in the Brexit referendum and 2016 U.S. election, partly using Facebook data.

Facebook Inc agreed on Wednesday to pay a $100 million fine to settle charges by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission that it misled investors about the misuse of its users’ data related to Cambridge Analytica.

Facebook did not admit or deny wrongdoing in agreeing to settle.

“Social media companies harvest millions of people’s personal data and sell it to the highest bidder. Personal data is being used on a mass scale to manipulate and influence people,” said Silkie Carlo, director of Big Brother Watch, a British civil liberties group.

Also Read- New Space Race Underway to Exploit Skies for Commercial Profit

“Data-driven manipulation of populations is not only the reserve of shady start-ups, disturbingly, it is becoming the modus operandi in modern politics.”

Directors Amer and Noujaim first came to prominence for their Academy Award nominated film “The Square,” which looked at social media as a catalyst for the 2011 Egyptian uprisings.

“We ultimately made a film about whether we have free will. It’s about democracy and it’s about complicity,” they said of their latest documentary. “These are arguably the most important questions of our time.” (VOA)