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Ian Hoomansing is all set to anchor Canadian Newscast

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Ian Harvey Hanomansing (born 1961) is a Canadian television journalist with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)
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March 11, 2017: Trinidad-born Canadian journalist is all set ready to kickstart The National, the main CBC newscast. Earlier, Hoomansing has worked for CBC as a reporter, anchor, and interviewer for the variety of assignments. The current anchor of CBC newscast, Peter Mansbridge who has served nearly three decades on the desk will step down on July 1.

Hoomansing is the second cousin to local old stager broadcaster Hans Hoomansing and Gideon Hanoomansingh, an independent TV anchor and also a former news anchor. Many Canadians acknowledge Ian hoomanshing to be the heir apparent. He has been with the CBC for past 30 years. Even at the age of 54, he looks a decade younger.

Gideon Hoomansing quoted that Ian was a meritorious claimant for the CBC newscast and that he was extremely proud of his Canadian relative. He also explained that Hoomansign in his early career dropped “H” from his name and was only called as ‘Ian Harvey’ when Canada was having trepidation with the Sikh community who were behaving absurdly at the time. However, Hoomansing in a TV interview in Canada revealed that – when he was working as a radio broadcaster, he used only first two initials of his name – Ian Harvey – and later realized that his audience could not identify him when he met them off air.

Lately, Hanomansing was awarded the 2016 Canadian Screen Award for Best News Anchor for The National. Hanomansing has been wooed by rival news organizations in the United States and Canada over the years, he was quoted on saying over the issue that ” I knew I was never going to leave the job”. His wife’s West Coast law career and the couple’s desire to keep their kids in the same schools led to 25 happy years in Vancouver. Nevertheless, A move to CBC’s broadcast center in Toronto — where “The National” has always been based — is doable now.

“I’ve lived through lots of changes at my time at CBC,” he says, “some incremental, some seismic.” He survived, for instance, the ruinous “Prime Time News” shift to 9 p.m in the early ’90s as well as the downsizing of the local supper hour newscasts in the 2000s. Hanomansing relishes being released from his teleprompter and might not be eager to be stuck behind one in a re-imagined version of “The National.”

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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Thanks To Artificial Intelligence, Radio Journalist Regains His Voice

The AI system slices each word read out by an individual into 100 tiny pieces

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AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues.
AI scenarios present ethical issues ranging from privacy, human rights, employment or other social issues. Pixabay

A US radio journalist who had lost his voice two years ago due to a rare neurological condition has regained the ability to speak, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI), the media reported.

Jamie Dupree, 54, a political radio journalist with Cox Media Group, got a new voice that trained a neural network to predict how he would talk, using samples from his old voice recordings, the BBC reported.

With his new voice, Dupree can now write a script and then use a free text-to-speech software programme called Balabolka on his laptop to turn it into an audio recording.

If a word or turn of phrase does not sound quite right in the recording, he can slow certain consonants or vowels down, or swap a word to one that does work, or change the pitch, and he can have a full radio story ready to go live in just seven minutes.

“This has saved my job and saved my family from a terrible financial unknown,” Dupree was quoted as saying to the BBC.

In 2016, Dupree was diagnosed with tongue protrusion dystonia — a rare neurological condition where the tongue pushes forward out of his mouth and his throat tightens whenever he wants to speak, making it impossible for him to say more than two or three words at a time.

artificial intelligence, brain
artificial intelligence, brain, Pixabay

Thanks to the new computer-generated voice, created for him by Scottish technology company CereProc, Dupree is set to come back on air, the report said.

The AI system slices each word read out by an individual into 100 tiny pieces, and does this with lots of common words until eventually it understands how basic phonetics work in that person’s voice and has an ordered sequence for all the pieces in each word.

Then, the neural network can create its own sounds and predict what the person would sound like if they were to say a series of words in conversation.

Also read: This Way China Can Help India In The Terms of Artificial Intelligence

“AI techniques work quite well on small constrained problems, and learning to model speech is something deep neural nets can do really well,” Chris Pidcock, CereProc’s chief technical officer and co-founder, told the BBC. (IANS)

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