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Ian Hoomansing is all set to anchor Canadian Newscast

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Ian Harvey Hanomansing (born 1961) is a Canadian television journalist with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC)

March 11, 2017: Trinidad-born Canadian journalist is all set ready to kickstart The National, the main CBC newscast. Earlier, Hoomansing has worked for CBC as a reporter, anchor, and interviewer for the variety of assignments. The current anchor of CBC newscast, Peter Mansbridge who has served nearly three decades on the desk will step down on July 1.

Hoomansing is the second cousin to local old stager broadcaster Hans Hoomansing and Gideon Hanoomansingh, an independent TV anchor and also a former news anchor. Many Canadians acknowledge Ian hoomanshing to be the heir apparent. He has been with the CBC for past 30 years. Even at the age of 54, he looks a decade younger.

Gideon Hoomansing quoted that Ian was a meritorious claimant for the CBC newscast and that he was extremely proud of his Canadian relative. He also explained that Hoomansign in his early career dropped “H” from his name and was only called as ‘Ian Harvey’ when Canada was having trepidation with the Sikh community who were behaving absurdly at the time. However, Hoomansing in a TV interview in Canada revealed that – when he was working as a radio broadcaster, he used only first two initials of his name – Ian Harvey – and later realized that his audience could not identify him when he met them off air.

Lately, Hanomansing was awarded the 2016 Canadian Screen Award for Best News Anchor for The National. Hanomansing has been wooed by rival news organizations in the United States and Canada over the years, he was quoted on saying over the issue that ” I knew I was never going to leave the job”. His wife’s West Coast law career and the couple’s desire to keep their kids in the same schools led to 25 happy years in Vancouver. Nevertheless, A move to CBC’s broadcast center in Toronto — where “The National” has always been based — is doable now.

“I’ve lived through lots of changes at my time at CBC,” he says, “some incremental, some seismic.” He survived, for instance, the ruinous “Prime Time News” shift to 9 p.m in the early ’90s as well as the downsizing of the local supper hour newscasts in the 2000s. Hanomansing relishes being released from his teleprompter and might not be eager to be stuck behind one in a re-imagined version of “The National.”

Prepared by Naina Mishra of Newsgram, Twitter @Nainamishr94

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US to Work with Australia, Canada to Cut Reliance on Chinese Minerals

Over 80 percent of the global supply chain of rare earth elements is controlled by one country

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US, Australia, Canada
FILE - Samples of rare earth minerals (L-R): Cerium oxide, Bastnasite, Neodymium oxide and Lanthanum carbonate are on display during a tour of Molycorp's Mountain Pass Rare Earth facility in Mountain Pass, California. VOA

The United States will team up with Canada and Australia to help countries around the world develop their reserves of minerals like lithium, copper and cobalt, the State Department said on Tuesday, part of a multi-pronged strategy to reduce global reliance on China for materials crucial to high-tech industries.

Washington grew more concerned recently about its dependence on mineral imports after Beijing suggested using them as leverage in the trade war between the world’s largest economic powers.

This would interrupt the manufacture of a wide range of consumer, industrial and military goods, including mobile phones, electric vehicles, batteries, and fighter jets.

“Over 80 percent of the global supply chain of rare earth elements — is controlled by one country,” the State Department said in a fact sheet outlining the effort, which it has dubbed the Energy Resource Governance Initiative. “Reliance on any one source increases the risk of supply disruptions.”

US, Australia, Canada
The United States will team up with Canada and Australia to help countries around the world. VOA

Under the plan, the United States will share mining expertise with other countries to help them discover and develop their resources, and advise on management and governance frameworks to help ensure their industries are attractive to international investors.

Doing so will help to ensure global supply for the minerals can meet world demand, which is projected to surge alongside the growing take-up in high-technology goods. “Demand for critical energy minerals could increase almost 1,000% by 2050,” according to the fact sheet.

Frank Fannon, the U.S. assistant secretary of state for energy resources, said in an interview that tensions with China show the United States should be producing more rare earth minerals and help others ensure a secure supply. “We need to do more and we are not alone in this,” Fannon said.

Canada and Australia, two major mining countries, were partnering in the effort and other allies could join later, a U.S. official said.

Also Read- In Hot Water? Warming Oceans may Reduce Sea Life by 17%,Says Study

Canada’s Ambassador to the United States, David MacNaughton, said Canadian officials have met with the State Department several times to discuss critical minerals and environmental issues around global mining and he looks forward to advancing the initiative.

Representatives of Australia did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

The plan was first reported on Tuesday morning by the Financial Times.

The plan comes a week after the U.S. Commerce Department recommended urgent steps to boost U.S. domestic production of “critical minerals,” including by providing low-interest loans to mining companies and requiring defense companies to “buy American.”

US, Australia, Canada
Washington grew more concerned recently about its dependence on mineral imports. Pixabay

The Commerce report also recommended that U.S. agencies review areas that are currently protected from development and assess whether those restrictions should be lifted or reduced to allow for critical minerals development. (VOA)