Thursday March 21, 2019

Ian Toothill: Meet the First Cancer Patient who climbed Mount Everest!

Ian Toothill from Sheffield UK has become the first cancer patient in the world to have climbed the top of the Mount Everest

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Ian Toothill
Ian Toothill says, "Nothing to see here... Just some cancer dude on top of Mount Everest, and for a few minutes the highest person in the world!" -Facebook Page Climbing Everest for Cancer
  • A man from Britain, diagnosed with bowel cancer, has climbed the Mount Everest
  • Ian Toothill, 47 years of age, was told by the doctors he has only months to live
  • He has become the first cancer patient to do so and has raised over £31,500 for cancer charity Macmillan

June 08, 2017: Ian Toothill had a childhood dream of climbing the Mount Everest. At age 47, he has successfully conquered his dream and become the first cancer patient to do so.

In June 2015, Toothill was diagnosed with bowel cancer. The doctors gave his 4 months to two years to live. He was on remission in early 2016, only later to be given months to live by the doctors.

On 14 May 2017, Ian Toothill reached the base camp to begin his attempt at conquering the Everest. He shared a picture of it on his Facebook page Climb Everest for Cancer, urging the followers to donate to the cancer charity Macmillan.

Upon reaching the summit, he celebrated by placing the flag of local football club Sheffield United FC to thank his friend for donating £1,000 to the cancer charity. Toothill himself is a Sheffield Wednesday FC fan and is the personal trainer of the club.

Ian Toothill shared on his page that he wants to inspire all cancer patients by his brave act. He motivated his followers to go ahead and do what they have always dreamt. Through this heroic act, Toothill has helped Macmillan cancer charity a total of £31,500.

We’d like to congratulate Ian Toothill for his bravery and courage!

Image from Ian Toothill’s Facebook page

 

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

Next Story

Researchers Discover Balance of Two Enzymes That May Help Treat Pancreatic Cancer

While still in the earliest stages, Newton hoped this information might one day aid pancreatic diagnostics and treatment

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Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

A new research has set the stage for clinicians to potentially use levels of a pancreatic cancer patient’s PHLPP1 and PKC enzymes as a prognostic and for researchers to develop new therapeutic drugs that change the balance of the two enzymes as a means to treat the disease.

The study, published on Wednesday in Molecular Cell, was led by Alexandra Newton, professor in the Department of Pharmacology at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine, and Timothy Baffi, a graduate student in her lab, Xinhua news agency reported.

The new study built on the team’s work in 2015 that found the enzyme PKC, which was believed in previous studies to promote tumour growth, actually suppressed it.

The latest study took the investigation a step further by uncovering how cells regulate PKC activity and discovered that any time an over-active PKC is inadvertently produced, the PHLPP1 “proofreader” tags it for destruction.

Cancer patient
Cancer patient.

“That means the amount of PHLPP1 in your cells determines your amount of PKC,” Newton said. “And it turns out those enzyme levels are especially important in pancreatic cancer.”

The team observed 105 pancreatic cancer tumours to analyze the enzyme levels in each one. About 50 per cent of patients with low PHLPP1/high PKC lived longer than five-and-a-half years.

Also Read- A Brain Circuit Can Help Reverse Craving for Liquor, Says Study

While still in the earliest stages, Newton hoped this information might one day aid pancreatic diagnostics and treatment.

Pancreatic cancer is caused by the abnormal and uncontrolled growth of cells in the pancreas, a large gland in the digestive system. It typically doesn’t show symptoms in the early stages. Sufferers tend to develop signs, such as back pain and jaundice, when it has spread to other organs. (IANS)