Friday December 14, 2018

Ian Toothill: Meet the First Cancer Patient who climbed Mount Everest!

Ian Toothill from Sheffield UK has become the first cancer patient in the world to have climbed the top of the Mount Everest

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Ian Toothill
Ian Toothill says, "Nothing to see here... Just some cancer dude on top of Mount Everest, and for a few minutes the highest person in the world!" -Facebook Page Climbing Everest for Cancer
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  • A man from Britain, diagnosed with bowel cancer, has climbed the Mount Everest
  • Ian Toothill, 47 years of age, was told by the doctors he has only months to live
  • He has become the first cancer patient to do so and has raised over £31,500 for cancer charity Macmillan

June 08, 2017: Ian Toothill had a childhood dream of climbing the Mount Everest. At age 47, he has successfully conquered his dream and become the first cancer patient to do so.

In June 2015, Toothill was diagnosed with bowel cancer. The doctors gave his 4 months to two years to live. He was on remission in early 2016, only later to be given months to live by the doctors.

On 14 May 2017, Ian Toothill reached the base camp to begin his attempt at conquering the Everest. He shared a picture of it on his Facebook page Climb Everest for Cancer, urging the followers to donate to the cancer charity Macmillan.

Upon reaching the summit, he celebrated by placing the flag of local football club Sheffield United FC to thank his friend for donating £1,000 to the cancer charity. Toothill himself is a Sheffield Wednesday FC fan and is the personal trainer of the club.

Ian Toothill shared on his page that he wants to inspire all cancer patients by his brave act. He motivated his followers to go ahead and do what they have always dreamt. Through this heroic act, Toothill has helped Macmillan cancer charity a total of £31,500.

We’d like to congratulate Ian Toothill for his bravery and courage!

Image from Ian Toothill’s Facebook page

 

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

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Copyright 2017 NewsGram

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World’s Smallest Wearable Can Help in Preventing Skin Cancer

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year

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World's smallest device to prevent skin cancer, mood disorder risk. Pixabay

Scientists have developed the world’s smallest wearable, battery-free device that can warn people of overexposure to ultraviolet rays (UV) — a leading factor for developing skin cancer.

Currently, people do not know how much UV light they are actually getting. The rugged and waterproof device interacts wirelessly with the phone and helps maintain an awareness and for skin cancer survivors.

Smaller than an M&M (colourful button-shaped chocolates) and thinner than a credit card, the device can optimise treatment of neonatal jaundice, skin diseases, seasonal affective disorder and reduce risk of sunburns and skin cancer.

Users can glue the device on to their hats, clip it to sunglasses or stick it on their nail and can simultaneously record up to three separate wavelengths of light.

It is always on yet never needs to be recharged.

“There is a critical need for technologies that can accurately measure and promote safe UV exposure at a personalised level in natural environments,” said Steve Xu, from Northwestern University in the US.

Cancer
Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“We hope people with information about their UV exposure will develop healthier habits when out in the sun,” said Xu.

There are no switches or interfaces to wear out, and it is completely sealed in a thin layer of transparent plastic, the researchers stated, in the paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Participants who mounted device on themselves recorded multiple forms of light exposure during outdoor activities, even in the water.

Also Read- First NASA Probe to Return Asteroid Sample Reaches Destination

The findings showed that it monitored therapeutic UV light in clinical phototherapy booths for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (immune diseases) as well as blue light phototherapy for newborns with jaundice in the neonatal intensive care unit.

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year. (IANS)