Sunday October 21, 2018

Ian Toothill: Meet the First Cancer Patient who climbed Mount Everest!

Ian Toothill from Sheffield UK has become the first cancer patient in the world to have climbed the top of the Mount Everest

0
//
185
Ian Toothill
Ian Toothill says, "Nothing to see here... Just some cancer dude on top of Mount Everest, and for a few minutes the highest person in the world!" -Facebook Page Climbing Everest for Cancer
Republish
Reprint
  • A man from Britain, diagnosed with bowel cancer, has climbed the Mount Everest
  • Ian Toothill, 47 years of age, was told by the doctors he has only months to live
  • He has become the first cancer patient to do so and has raised over £31,500 for cancer charity Macmillan

June 08, 2017: Ian Toothill had a childhood dream of climbing the Mount Everest. At age 47, he has successfully conquered his dream and become the first cancer patient to do so.

In June 2015, Toothill was diagnosed with bowel cancer. The doctors gave his 4 months to two years to live. He was on remission in early 2016, only later to be given months to live by the doctors.

On 14 May 2017, Ian Toothill reached the base camp to begin his attempt at conquering the Everest. He shared a picture of it on his Facebook page Climb Everest for Cancer, urging the followers to donate to the cancer charity Macmillan.

Upon reaching the summit, he celebrated by placing the flag of local football club Sheffield United FC to thank his friend for donating £1,000 to the cancer charity. Toothill himself is a Sheffield Wednesday FC fan and is the personal trainer of the club.

Ian Toothill shared on his page that he wants to inspire all cancer patients by his brave act. He motivated his followers to go ahead and do what they have always dreamt. Through this heroic act, Toothill has helped Macmillan cancer charity a total of £31,500.

We’d like to congratulate Ian Toothill for his bravery and courage!

Image from Ian Toothill’s Facebook page

 

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2017 NewsGram

Next Story

ADHD May Be Improved With Support And Self Regulation: Study

While research shows that medication is effective, it does not work for all children, and is not acceptable to some families.

0
ADHD
How school support may help ADHD children. Pixabay

One-to-one support and a focus on self-regulation may improve academic outcomes of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a new study suggests.

ADHD refers to a chronic condition including attention difficulty, hyperactivity and impulsiveness.

“Children with ADHD are of course all unique. It’s a complex issue and there is no one-size-fits-all approach,” said Tamsin Ford, Professor from the the University of Exeter in the UK.

child, ADHD
The results indicate that children with ADHD who received canine assisted intervention (CAI) experienced a reduction in inattention and an improvement in social skills. Pixabay

“However, our research gives the strongest evidence to date that non-drug interventions in schools can support children to meet their potential in terms of academic and other outcomes,” said Ford.

For the study, published in the journal Review of Education, the team found 28 randomised control trials on non-drug measures to support children with ADHD in schools.

They found that important aspects of successful interventions for improving the academic outcomes of children are when they focus on self-regulation and are delivered in one-to-one sessions.

According to the study, self-regulation is hard for children who are very impulsive and struggle to focus attention.

robots, ADHD
The children were set daily targets which were reviewed via a card that the child carried between home and school and between lessons in school and rewards were given for meeting targets. VOA

In addition, the children were set daily targets which were reviewed via a card that the child carried between home and school and between lessons in school and rewards were given for meeting targets.

Also Read: Lack Of Proper Sleep May Lead To Impairment Of Mental Skills: Study

While research shows that medication is effective, it does not work for all children, and is not acceptable to some families.

“More and better quality research is needed but in the mean-time, schools should try daily report cards and to increase children’s ability to regulate their emotions. These approaches may work best for children with ADHD by one-to-one delivery,” Ford noted. (IANS)