Wednesday October 23, 2019

Ian Toothill: Meet the First Cancer Patient who climbed Mount Everest!

Ian Toothill from Sheffield UK has become the first cancer patient in the world to have climbed the top of the Mount Everest

0
//
Ian Toothill
Ian Toothill says, "Nothing to see here... Just some cancer dude on top of Mount Everest, and for a few minutes the highest person in the world!" -Facebook Page Climbing Everest for Cancer
  • A man from Britain, diagnosed with bowel cancer, has climbed the Mount Everest
  • Ian Toothill, 47 years of age, was told by the doctors he has only months to live
  • He has become the first cancer patient to do so and has raised over £31,500 for cancer charity Macmillan

June 08, 2017: Ian Toothill had a childhood dream of climbing the Mount Everest. At age 47, he has successfully conquered his dream and become the first cancer patient to do so.

In June 2015, Toothill was diagnosed with bowel cancer. The doctors gave his 4 months to two years to live. He was on remission in early 2016, only later to be given months to live by the doctors.

On 14 May 2017, Ian Toothill reached the base camp to begin his attempt at conquering the Everest. He shared a picture of it on his Facebook page Climb Everest for Cancer, urging the followers to donate to the cancer charity Macmillan.

Upon reaching the summit, he celebrated by placing the flag of local football club Sheffield United FC to thank his friend for donating £1,000 to the cancer charity. Toothill himself is a Sheffield Wednesday FC fan and is the personal trainer of the club.

Ian Toothill shared on his page that he wants to inspire all cancer patients by his brave act. He motivated his followers to go ahead and do what they have always dreamt. Through this heroic act, Toothill has helped Macmillan cancer charity a total of £31,500.

We’d like to congratulate Ian Toothill for his bravery and courage!

Image from Ian Toothill’s Facebook page

 

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

Next Story

Study Says, Men With Breast Cancer Face High Mortality Rates

The study used 11 years of registry data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014, which included 1.8 million female and 16,025 male patients

0
Men
Other factors that might influence mortality rates among Men could be lifestyle factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and obesity. Pixabay

Men with breast cancer are more likely to have lower overall survival rates than their female counterparts, a study said.

“The persistent disparity, derived from an analysis of data from the National Cancer Database, suggests a possible distinct cancer biology, less effective treatment or compliance issues, and perhaps unhealthy lifestyles among men may be responsible for the lower overall survival rates,” said the study’s senior author Xiao-Ou Shu from the Vanderbilt University in the US.

The five-year mortality rate for men was 19 per cent higher than women, according to the research published in the journal JAMA Oncology.

The study used 11 years of registry data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2014, which included 1.8 million female and 16,025 male patients.

About 85 per cent of male breast cancer is Estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, a proportion that is higher than female breast cancer patients (75 per cent).

“That is a cancer type where patients usually fare better because we have a hormonal treatment.

“We have a lot of treatment options for that type of breast cancer. In theory, men should have better outcomes and have lower mortality as women do if the treatment is equally effective,” Shu said.

According to the researchers, previous studies have shown that men might not be as compliant with hormonal treatments as women.

Men
The five-year mortality rate for Men was 19 per cent higher than women, according to the research published in the journal JAMA Oncology. Pixabay

Other factors that might influence mortality rates among men could be lifestyle factors, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and obesity.

Clinical characteristics and under treatments were associated with 63 per cent of the sex-related mortality disparity.

“The bottom line is that we need more studies specifically focused on male breast cancer,” Shu added. (IANS)