Monday December 16, 2019

Ian Toothill: Meet the First Cancer Patient who climbed Mount Everest!

Ian Toothill from Sheffield UK has become the first cancer patient in the world to have climbed the top of the Mount Everest

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Ian Toothill
Ian Toothill says, "Nothing to see here... Just some cancer dude on top of Mount Everest, and for a few minutes the highest person in the world!" -Facebook Page Climbing Everest for Cancer
  • A man from Britain, diagnosed with bowel cancer, has climbed the Mount Everest
  • Ian Toothill, 47 years of age, was told by the doctors he has only months to live
  • He has become the first cancer patient to do so and has raised over £31,500 for cancer charity Macmillan

June 08, 2017: Ian Toothill had a childhood dream of climbing the Mount Everest. At age 47, he has successfully conquered his dream and become the first cancer patient to do so.

In June 2015, Toothill was diagnosed with bowel cancer. The doctors gave his 4 months to two years to live. He was on remission in early 2016, only later to be given months to live by the doctors.

On 14 May 2017, Ian Toothill reached the base camp to begin his attempt at conquering the Everest. He shared a picture of it on his Facebook page Climb Everest for Cancer, urging the followers to donate to the cancer charity Macmillan.

Upon reaching the summit, he celebrated by placing the flag of local football club Sheffield United FC to thank his friend for donating £1,000 to the cancer charity. Toothill himself is a Sheffield Wednesday FC fan and is the personal trainer of the club.

Ian Toothill shared on his page that he wants to inspire all cancer patients by his brave act. He motivated his followers to go ahead and do what they have always dreamt. Through this heroic act, Toothill has helped Macmillan cancer charity a total of £31,500.

We’d like to congratulate Ian Toothill for his bravery and courage!

Image from Ian Toothill’s Facebook page

 

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

Next Story

Kids in LMICs Receive Excessive Amount of Antibiotic Prescriptions

Kids in low income countries prescribed excess antibiotics

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Antibiotic Prescriptions
Children who receive excessive antibiotic prescriptions may lose the ability to fight pathogens. Pixabay

Kids in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) are receiving an excessive amount of antibiotic prescriptions that could harm the children’s ability to fight pathogens as well as increase antibiotic resistance worldwide, warns a new study.

Children in these countries received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age five – a “remarkable” estimate, given that two antibiotic prescriptions per year is considered excessive in many high-income settings, said the study published in the journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

“We knew children in LMICs are sick more often, and we knew antibiotic prescription rates are high in many countries. What we did not know was how these elements translate into actual antibiotic exposure – and the results are rather alarming,” said lead author of the study Gunther Fink from Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH), Basel, Switzerland.

Antimicrobial resistance is one of today’s biggest threats to global health and development, according to the World Health Organization.

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Children in LMICs received 25 antibiotic prescriptions through age. Pixabay

One factor contributing to this global health threat is the excessive use of antibiotics worldwide.

The research team from Swiss TPH and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in the US analysed data from 2007-2017 from health facilities and household surveys from eight countries: Haiti, Kenya, Malawi, Namibia, Nepal, Senegal, Tanzania, and Uganda.

Results showed that antibiotics were administered in 81 per cent of cases for children with a respiratory illness, in 50 per cent for children with diarrhoea, and in 28 per cent for children with malaria.

The researchers found that the number of antibiotic prescriptions in early childhood varied from country to country.

While a child in Senegal received approximately one antibiotic prescription per year in the first five years of life, a child in Uganda was prescribed up to 12.

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In comparison, a prior study showed that children under five in Europe receive less than one antibiotic prescription per year on average.

“This number is still high given that the vast majority of infections in this age group are of viral origin,” said study co-author Valerie D’Acremont from Swiss TPH. (IANS)