Tuesday June 25, 2019

ICAR-CMFRI Develops Dietary Supplements from Seaweeds to Combat Hypertension

The extract contains 100 per cent natural marine bioactive ingredients from selected seaweeds

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ICAR, CMFRI, Dietary Supplement
The city-headquartered Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) on Tuesday came out with a nutraceutical product. Pixabay

The city-headquartered Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) on Tuesday came out with a nutraceutical product, developed from seaweeds, to combat hypertension.

The sixth in the series of the CMFRI’s nutraceutical products, Cadalmin Antihypertensive extract (Cadalmin AHe) was developed from seaweeds, commonly available in the Indian coastal waters and known for their extraordinary medicinal properties.

Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) Director General Trilochan Mohapatra released Cadalmin AHe, which was developed from bioactive pharmacophore leads from seaweeds, and can be administered orally to regulate hypertension.

“The extract contains 100 per cent natural marine bioactive ingredients from selected seaweeds by a patented technology, and would be made available in 400 mg capsules. This nutraceutical does not have any side effects as established by detailed preclinical trials,” said Kajal Chakraborty, Senior Scientist at the CMFRI who developed the product.

ICAR, CMFRI, Dietary Supplement
The city-headquartered Central Marine Fisheries Research Institute (CMFRI) on Tuesday came out with a nutraceutical product, developed from seaweeds. Pixabay

ICAR-CMFRI Director A. Gopalakrishnan said that entrepreneurs and start-ups are welcome to upscale and market this product by an expression of interest with the CMFRI.

“The institute is in the process of developing more health products from the underutilized seaweeds. Efforts are on for standardizing and promoting seaweed farming all along the Indian coasts as a livelihood option for the coastal communities. This is expected to compensate for the dip in income for the fishermen during lean seasons,” he said.

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The institute has already developed and commercialised natural products for diseases such as diabetes, arthritis, cholesterol and hypothyroidism. (IANS)

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Smoking May Increase Risk of Developing Hypertension, Warn Researchers

The results were published in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

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FILE - New findings show that smoking causes devastating genetic damage, or mutations, in the cells of various organs in the body. VOA

Smoking may increase the risk of developing hypertension by impairing the body’s blood pressure autocorrect system, warn researchers.

“The human body has a buffering system that continuously monitors and maintains a healthy blood pressure. If blood pressure drops, a response called muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is triggered to bring blood pressure back up to normal levels,” said Lawrence Sinoway from Penn State University in the US.

An additional system — called the baroreflex — helps correct if blood pressure gets too high, he added.

According to Sinoway, the study found that after a burst of MSNA, the rise in blood pressure in a chronic smoker was about twice as great as in a non-smoker, pushing blood pressure to unhealthy levels. The researchers suspect that impairment of baroreflex may be the culprit.

“When the sympathetic nervous system fires, like with MSNA, your blood pressure rises and then a series of things happen to buffer that increase, to try to attenuate it,” Sinoway said.

“We think that in smokers, that buffering — the baroreflex — is impaired.”

Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay
Other than chronic diseases, lifestyle habits like smoking causes cancer too. Pixabay

The results suggest that this impairment may be connected to hypertension, said Jian Cui, Associate Professor at Penn State College of Medicine.

“The greater rise in blood pressure in response to MSNA may contribute to a higher resting blood pressure level in smokers without hypertension,” Cui said.

“It’s possible that this higher response to MSNA could also contribute to the eventual development of hypertension,” Cui added.

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The researchers said that while previous research has found a link between chronic smokers and higher levels of MSNA bursts, less was known about what happened to blood pressure after these bursts.

For the study, the researchers examined 60 participants — 18 smokers and 42 non-smokers. None of the participants had hypertension.

The results were published in the American Journal of Physiology-Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. (IANS)