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Iconic iPhone from Apple turns 10 this year, has sold more than one billion iPhones since then

Sales of iPhone were a large factor towards making Apple one of the richest companies in the world

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In this Jan. 9, 2007 file photo, Apple CEO Steve Jobs holds up an Apple iPhone at the MacWorld Conference in San Francisco. Apple Inc. VOA

Jan 09, 2017: Smartphones are everywhere, so it is hard to believe the iconic iPhone from Apple was launched just 10 years ago today.

That day Apple co-founder Steve Jobs took the stage at Macworld 2007 to introduce what he called three products in one, “a widescreen iPod with touch controls, a revolutionary mobile phone and a breakthrough internet communications device.”

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Apple has sold more than one billion iPhones since then, changing the way we communicate, take pictures, listen to music, watch videos and keep in touch with loved ones, to name a few.

“iPhone is an essential part of our customers’ lives, and today more than ever it is redefining the way we communicate, entertain, work and live,” said Tim Cook, Apple’s CEO. “iPhone set the standard for mobile computing in its first decade and we are just getting started. The best is yet to come.”

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Currently, Apple is selling the seventh edition of the smartphone, iPhone 7, and a larger version, the iPhone 7 Plus.

Sales of iPhone were a large factor toward making Apple one of the richest companies in the world.

“Too often, only modest advances are over hyped as “world-changing” and “revolutionary,” but I believe those phrases understate the impact of the iPhone,” Sprint CEO Marcelo Claure told Fortune magazine. “Steve Jobs and Apple didn’t just create a product and then market its features. They sparked a true technological revolution because they’ve always had a laser focus on providing billions of people a better way to do the things they do every day.” (VOA)

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Apple Watch Can Detect And Notify Users Irregular Heart Rhythms

The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care," said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine. 

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The study is expected to play a crucial role in the future stability research of PSCs. Pixabay

Apple Watch can detect and notify users when they experience irregular heart rhythms, finds a study demonstrating the ability of wearable technology to detect atrial fibrillation.

In 2017, Apple had partnered with researchers from the Stanford University and launched an app called “Apple Heart Study” to determine whether a mobile app that uses data from a heart rate pulse sensor on the Apple Watch can identify atrial fibrillation.

Atrial fibrillation, a deadly and often undiagnosed condition, can lead to strokes. The condition often remains hidden because many people do not experience symptoms.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value. Pixabay

The findings showed only 0.5 per cent participants received irregular pulse notifications, an important finding given the concerns about potential over-notification.

Eighty-four per cent of the time participants who received irregular pulse notifications were found to be in atrial fibrillation at the time of the notification and 34 per cent who followed up by using an ECG patch over a week later were found to have atrial fibrillation.

“The results of the Apple Heart Study highlight the role that innovative digital technology can play in creating more predictive and preventive health care,” said Lloyd Minor of the Stanford School of Medicine.

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“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. Pixabay

“Atrial fibrillation is just the beginning, as this study opens the door to further research into wearable technologies and how they might be used to prevent disease before it strikes — a key goal of precision health,” Minor said.

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Comparisons between irregular pulse-detection on Apple Watch and simultaneous electrocardiography patch recordings showed the pulse detection algorithm has 71 per cent positive predictive value.

“The performance and accuracy we observed in this study provides important information as we seek to understand the potential impact of wearable technology on the health system,” noted Marco Perez, Associate Professor of cardiovascular medicine at Stanford. (IANS)