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Identify a person by analyzing his or her hair, says a new Research in US

The researchers looked at hair samples that were "up to 250 years old” along with samples from 76 living humans

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A researcher at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories holds a sample of ancient hair. Source-VOA
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  • A new research may help identify a person by analyzing their hair
  • According to researchers, Hair contains unique protein markers which help with the identification
  • Chemist Brad Hart, Director of the Forensic Science Center and co-author of the paper said this would be game-changing in the field of forensic science

September 12, 2016: Your hair could be just as unique as your DNA, according to new research.

Writing in the journal PLOS ONE, researchers from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory say unique protein markers in hair could be used to make forensic and archeological identification easier.

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Moreover, the proteins are more durable over time, while DNA can deteriorate.

To reach their conclusions, the researchers looked at hair samples that were “up to 250 years old” along with samples from 76 living humans. The researchers say they’ve found 185 protein markers to date, which they think would be enough to identify an individual from a population of one million.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Pixabay
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Pixabay

The researchers say they hope to find “around a hundred” core markers that could be used to “distinguish an individual among the entire world’s population using a single hair.”

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“We are in a very similar place with protein-based identification to where DNA profiling was during the early days of its development,” said LLNL chemist Brad Hart, the director of the lab’s Forensic Science Center and co-author of a paper discussing the work. “This method will be a game-changer for forensics, and while we’ve made a lot of progress toward proving it, there are steps to go before this new technique will be able to reach its full potential.” (VOA)

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  • Manthra koliyer

    This is surely a great progress in the field of science!

  • Yokeshwari Manivel

    hahahhaa ! a one more invention to the medical science .shows the growing development of different economy

Next Story

Non-invasive brainwave technology can potentially cut post-traumatic stress

The technology works through resonance between brain frequencies and the acoustic stimulation, where the brain is supported to make self-adjustments towards improved balance and reduced hyperarousal. It requires no conscious or cognitive activity.

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Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
Brainwaves can now potentially cure PTSD.
  • The new technology aims to reduce the effect of post traumatic stress in an individual.
  • It can reduce many post-traumatic symptoms, including insomnia, depressive mood and anxiety.

Researchers have developed a non-invasive brainwave mirroring technology that can significantly reduce symptoms of post-traumatic stress, especially in military personnel.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a disorder characterised by failure to recover after experiencing or witnessing a terrifying event.

PTSD can cause Insomnia, Anxiety and many other mental problems.
PTSD can cause Insomnia, Anxiety and many other mental problems. Wikipediacommon

The symptoms include insomnia, poor concentration, sadness, re-experiencing traumatic events, irritability or hyper-alertness, as well as diminished autonomic cardiovascular regulation.

“Ongoing symptoms of post-traumatic stress, whether clinically diagnosed or not, are a pervasive problem in the military,” said lead investigator Charles H. Tegeler, professor, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Centre in North Carolina.

“Medications are often used to help control specific symptoms, but can produce side effects. Other treatments may not be well tolerated, and few show a benefit for the associated sleep disturbance. Additional non-invasive, non-drug therapies are needed,” Tegeler added.

In the study, published in the journal Military Medical Research, the team used a high-resolution, relational, resonance-based, electroencephalic mirroring (HIRREM) — a non-invasive method, in which computer software algorithms translate specific brain frequencies into audible tones in real time.

This provides a chance for the brain to listen to itself through an acoustic mirror, Tegeler said.

The results showed reductions in post-traumatic symptoms, including insomnia, depressive mood and anxiety after six months of using the brainwave technology.

The technology works through resonance between brain frequencies and the acoustic stimulation, where the brain is supported to make self-adjustments towards improved balance and reduced hyperarousal. It requires no conscious or cognitive activity.

The net effect is to support the brain to reset stress response patterns that have been rewired by repetitive traumatic events, physical or non-physical, the researchers said. IANS