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If Hillary Clinton prevails over Donald Trump, will Bill Clinton be the First … Gentleman?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton arrive at Temple University in Philadelphia on July 29, 2016

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Former President Bill Clinton campaigns for his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center in Cincinnati, Feb. 12, 2016. Image source: VOA

Sept 07, 2016: Come January, there could be two presidents in the White House. That is, at the polls November 8.

The second president would be Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, who would take on the role as … first lady? First spouse? First man?

At this point, we don’t know. The protocol for the first-ever scenario is really guesswork.

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“There are no precedents,” said Allan Litchman, professor of history at American University in Washington, D.C. “But certainly he should not be called the first lady. He should be called the first gentleman, of course.”

FILE - Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA
FILE – Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA

In the United States, a first lady traditionally maintains a low profile and a quietly supportive role. Historically, first ladies adopt a non-controversial policy initiative; just think of first lady Michelle Obama’s campaign to reduce childhood obesity. It’s an issue that the vast majority of Americans can support.

Hillary Clinton tried a different approach, taking on the overhaul of the U.S. healthcare system, a very complex, controversial policy issue with many stakeholders. Ultimately, that effort failed.

The Clintons have already indicated that Bill Clinton will relinquish his role at the Clinton Foundation to avoid any appearance of conflicts of interests.

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So, what role might he take on should he become America’s first-ever first gentleman? Will he host teas or choose the White House decor?

“He’s going to have to learn,” Lichtman said. “And I think he can at the age of 70. He’s certainly smart enough to figure all of that out.”

FILE - Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA
FILE – Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton arrive at Temple University in Philadelphia on July 29, 2016. (AP)

But Clinton is a known “loose cannon,” Litchman points out. And if he overshadows his wife, the president (if she is elected president), Litchman says that could cause problems.

“Whether he can keep himself under control is the bigger and much more interesting question,” he said. (VOA)

 

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U.S. President Donald Trump Vetoes Measure to End U..S Involvement in Yemen War

ump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure.

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Men inspect the site of an airstrike by Saudi-led coalition in Sanaa, Yemen, April 10, 2019. VOA

President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen.

In a break with the president, Congress voted for the first time earlier this month to invoke the War Powers Resolution to try to stop U.S. involvement in a foreign conflict.

The veto — the second in Trump’s presidency — was expected. Congress lacks the votes to override him.

“This resolution is an unnecessary, dangerous attempt to weaken my constitutional authorities, endangering the lives of American citizens and brave service members, both today and in the future,” Trump wrote in explaining his veto.

Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival.

Many lawmakers also criticized the president for not condemning Saudi Arabia for the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, a Saudi who lived in the United States and had written critically about the kingdom. Khashoggi went into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last October and never came out. Intelligence agencies said Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was complicit in the killing.

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Congress has grown uneasy with Trump’s close relationship with Saudi Arabia as he tries to further isolate Iran, a regional rival. VOA

The U.S. provides billions of dollars of arms to the Saudi-led coalition fighting against Iran-backed rebels in Yemen. Members of Congress have expressed concern about the thousands of civilians killed in coalition airstrikes since the conflict began in 2014. The fighting in the Arab world’s poorest country also has left millions suffering from food and medical care shortages and has pushed the country to the brink of famine.

House approval of the resolution came earlier this month on a 247-175 vote. The Senate vote last month was 54-46.

Democratic Rep. Eliot Engel of New York, chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, voted to end U.S. military assistance to the war, saying the humanitarian crisis in Yemen triggered “demands moral leadership.”

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President Donald Trump on Wednesday vetoed a bill passed by Congress to end U.S. military assistance in Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen. VOA

The top Republican on the committee, Rep. Michael McCaul of Texas, acknowledged the dire situation in Yemen for civilians, but spoke out in opposition to the bill. McCaul said it was an abuse of the War Powers Resolution and predicted it could disrupt U.S. security cooperation agreements with more than 100 countries.

Also Read: Despite Tariff War With U.S, China’s Economic Growth is Steady

Trump issued his first veto last month on legislation related to immigration. Trump had declared a national emergency so he could use more money to construct a border wall. Congress voted to block the emergency declaration and Trump vetoed that measure. (VOA)