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If Hillary Clinton prevails over Donald Trump, will Bill Clinton be the First … Gentleman?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton arrive at Temple University in Philadelphia on July 29, 2016

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Former President Bill Clinton campaigns for his wife, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, at the Clifton Cultural Arts Center in Cincinnati, Feb. 12, 2016. Image source: VOA
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Sept 07, 2016: Come January, there could be two presidents in the White House. That is, at the polls November 8.

The second president would be Clinton’s husband, former President Bill Clinton, who would take on the role as … first lady? First spouse? First man?

At this point, we don’t know. The protocol for the first-ever scenario is really guesswork.

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“There are no precedents,” said Allan Litchman, professor of history at American University in Washington, D.C. “But certainly he should not be called the first lady. He should be called the first gentleman, of course.”

FILE - Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA
FILE – Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA

In the United States, a first lady traditionally maintains a low profile and a quietly supportive role. Historically, first ladies adopt a non-controversial policy initiative; just think of first lady Michelle Obama’s campaign to reduce childhood obesity. It’s an issue that the vast majority of Americans can support.

Hillary Clinton tried a different approach, taking on the overhaul of the U.S. healthcare system, a very complex, controversial policy issue with many stakeholders. Ultimately, that effort failed.

The Clintons have already indicated that Bill Clinton will relinquish his role at the Clinton Foundation to avoid any appearance of conflicts of interests.

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So, what role might he take on should he become America’s first-ever first gentleman? Will he host teas or choose the White House decor?

“He’s going to have to learn,” Lichtman said. “And I think he can at the age of 70. He’s certainly smart enough to figure all of that out.”

FILE - Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA
FILE – Then-President Bill Clinton and first lady Hillary Clinton are shown in Washington in 1994. Image source: VOA

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton and former President Bill Clinton arrive at Temple University in Philadelphia on July 29, 2016. (AP)

But Clinton is a known “loose cannon,” Litchman points out. And if he overshadows his wife, the president (if she is elected president), Litchman says that could cause problems.

“Whether he can keep himself under control is the bigger and much more interesting question,” he said. (VOA)

 

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Martin Greenfield, A Holocaust Survivor Now Dresses Celebs

While washing and scrubbing one of the Nazi’s uniforms, I ripped the collar of the shirt

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Holocaust Survivor Becomes America’s Tailor
Holocaust Survivor Becomes America’s Tailor, VOA

But Greenfield did not arrive at his career in a usual way. He didn’t dream of growing up to sew clothes, or learn the business as an apprentice. Instead, Greenfield’s first encounter with a needle and thread happened when he was a prisoner at the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1944. He was 15 years old.

​“While washing and scrubbing one of the Nazi’s uniforms, I ripped the collar of the shirt. The guard became angry and beat me with his baton. A nice man working in the laundry taught me how to sew a simple stitch,” says Greenfield.

The kapo having no more use for the shirt, Greenfield kept the shirt for himself.

“I eventually took the shirt and wore it all through the concentration camp, until I got to another camp (Buchenwald) and they made me take it off.”

Martin Greenfield
Martin Greenfield, VOA

For Greenfield, the shirt had much value.

“The day I first wore the shirt was the day I learned clothes possess power. Clothes don’t just ‘make the man,’ they can save the man. The kapos treated me a little better. Even some of the prisoners did the same. Wearing the shirt, the kapos didn’t mess with me and they thought I was somebody.”

Greenfield’s parents and siblings were also at the concentration camp. The family was forced by the Nazis to leave their small hometown of Pavlovo, Czechoslovakia. Once at the camp, Greenfield never saw his family again. His father, mother, sisters, brother, and grandparents were killed. His life was spared.

“My father said no matter what job they give you, you do it and you will always survive. And I did survive,” he says.

After World War II, Greenfield immigrated to the United States.

Martin Greenfield holding the suit he stitched
Martin Greenfield holding the suit he stitched, VOA

He landed a job at GGG Clothing Company as a “floor boy” – someone who ran errands and did odd jobs. But he worked his way up, and in 1977 he bought the company and give it his name: Martin Greenfield Clothiers.

Greenfield is 89 years old now. His two sons, Jay and Tod, along with more than 100 other people, work at his company. But Greenfield still comes to the shop every day and walks the floor, managing workflow production and paying close attention to detail. When asked about his success, Greenfield gives credit to the talent and hard work of his employees. He also notes the importance of a satisfied customer.

Also read: Yazidi Woman who Survived Genocide Equates the Current Situation to Jewish Holocausts

“When I deliver a suit and they put it on and say, ‘My God, this is beautiful’, they know it is the quality we produce,” he says. “We satisfy our customers so they could come back again because we have the best suits ever!”  (VOA)