Wednesday March 20, 2019

If you are a Woman with a Good Sense of Smell, you may have a thriving Social Life!

For the study, the team analysed 3,005 adults in US between the ages of 57 and 85, and included odour identification test scores as well as information about participants' social lives

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Women taking selfie (Representational Image), VOA

March 24, 2017: If you are a woman with a good sense of smell, you may have a thriving social life, as well as have improved overall mental and physical health, a study has showed.

The findings, published in the journal Scientific Reports, showed that the decline in this olfactory function — sense of smell — in elderly women may affect their social life and lead to fewer social connections.

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 “Our findings confirm that the sense of smell is a key aspect of overall health in the ageing population,” said Johan Lundstrom, neuroscientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center — a US based non-profit scientific institute.

“We know that social interactions are closely linked to health status, so older women who have a poor sense of smell may want to focus on maintaining a vital social life to help improve their overall mental and physical health,” added Sanne Boesveldt, Assistant Professor at Wageningen University & Research in Netherlands.

Interestingly, the same association between olfactory function and social life was not found in older men.

“This intriguing sex difference could suggest that smell training, which has been shown to improve a reduced sense of smell in both men and women, may have an additional beneficial function in older women by helping to restore both the sense of smell and, by extension, social well-being,” Lundstrom said.

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For the study, the team analysed 3,005 adults in US between the ages of 57 and 85, and included odour identification test scores as well as information about participants’ social lives.

However, its not yet clear exactly how the link between the sense of smell and social life is connected or if the same relationship also exists in younger women, the researchers said.

Another study, appearing in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study, showed that poor smell was linked with an increased risk of dying. (IANS)

Next Story

Know When Older Adults Feel Younger Than Their Age

Study participants were asked questions aimed at assessing their daily stresses, physical health, sense of control over their daily lives, and how old they felt.

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"The more control older adults think they have, the younger they feel," said study co-author Shevaun Neupert, Professor at North Carolina State University in the US. Pixabay

Older adults feel younger when they feel that they have more control over their daily lives, regardless of stress or health concerns, suggests new research.

However, stress and health — not a sense of control — play a significant role in how old younger adults feel, said the study published in the Journal of Gerontology: Psychological Sciences.

“The more control older adults think they have, the younger they feel,” said study co-author Shevaun Neupert, Professor at North Carolina State University in the US.

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However, an individual’s sense of control had no bearing on self-perceptions of age for young adults. But stress and adverse changes in health did make young people feel older. Pixabay

For this study, the researchers had 116 older adults (ages 60-90) and 107 younger adults (ages 18-36) fill out a daily survey for eight consecutive days. Study participants were asked questions aimed at assessing their daily stresses, physical health, sense of control over their daily lives, and how old they felt.

“Everyone’s sense of control fluctuates from day to day, or even over the course of a day — that’s normal,” Neupert said.

“We found that when older adults felt more in control, they also felt younger. That was true even when accounting for stress and physical health.”

However, an individual’s sense of control had no bearing on self-perceptions of age for young adults. But stress and adverse changes in health did make young people feel older.

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“Everyone’s sense of control fluctuates from day to day, or even over the course of a day — that’s normal,” Neupert said. Pixabay

Also Read: Concerns Rise Over China’s Stand at United Nations Human Rights Council

“This highlights the importance of having older adults retain some sense of autonomy,” Neupert said.

“It’s not just a nice thing to do, it actually affects their well-being.” (IANS)