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IIT Guwahati Developing AI-Enabled Chatbot Named “ALBELA” to Teach and Support First Year Students of EEE

Earlier we did the trial runs of the chatbot, and started using from this academic session onwards

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IIT, Guwahati, Chatbot
We have been working on its development since last 7 months with a team of dedicated 7 research scholars of the department. Pixabay

In a bid to promote learning through Artificial Intelligence (AI), a team of postgraduate students from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Guwahati, along with their faculty members are developing an Artificial Intelligence-enabled chatbot named “ALBELA” to teach and support first year students of Electrical and Electronics Engineering (EEE).

“We have been working on its development since last 7 months with a team of dedicated 7 research scholars of the department. Earlier we did the trial runs of the chatbot, and started using from this academic session onwards.

“The response from the students has been overwhelming and we hope that this will become the new normal in near future. Prof. Rohit Sinha, Head EEE Department, and the team IBM have extended their continuous support for this activity,” Praveen Kumar, Professor, Department of EEE, IIT Guwahati, said in a statement.

IIT, Guwahati, Chatbot
In a bid to promote learning through Artificial Intelligence (AI), a team of postgraduate students from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Guwahati, along with their faculty members are developing. Pixabay

The chatbot would help students find their class schedule, tutorial schedule, and examination queries via a AI-based chat window. Students at times may hesitate to approach an instructor regarding their queries, but with this chat-based system students can clear their doubts, both technical and non-technical, according to the institution.

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“The team is developing the analytical problem solving skill. It will be helpful for the students to learn how to solve analytical problems related to the course. Within next one year, we will extend it to biomedical signal processing, electrical machine courses, said Samarendra Dandapat, Professor, Department of EEE at IIT Guwahati. (IANS)

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IIT Mandi Researchers Developing Thermoelectric Materials to Efficiently Convert Heat into Electricity

Generating power from heat, for example, is attractive as there is a lot of energy that is generated through human activity in industries like power plants

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IIT, Thermoelectric, Electricity
While solar power has received a lot of attention, other alternative sources, even if less known, are equally promising. Pixabay

 Indian Institute of Technology Mandi researchers in Himachal Pradesh are developing thermoelectric materials that can efficiently convert heat into electricity.

While solar power has received a lot of attention, other alternative sources, even if less known, are equally promising.

Generating power from heat, for example, is attractive as there is a lot of energy that is generated through human activity in industries like power plants, home appliances and automobiles, where most of this heat is lost.

A research team led by Ajay Soni, Associate Professor (Physics) with the School of Basic Sciences, IIT-Mandi, is studying materials that can convert heat into electricity.

IIT, Thermoelectric, Electricity
Indian Institute of Technology Mandi researchers in Himachal Pradesh are developing thermoelectric materials that can efficiently convert heat into electricity. Pixabay

The team has been engaged in research on thermoelectric materials and many of its papers have been published in reputed peer-review international journals, including Applied Physics Letters, Physical Review B and Journal of Alloys and Compounds.

“Thermoelectric materials work on the principle of Seebeck effect, in which electricity is generated due to temperature differences across the junction of two materials,” Soni said.

A typical thermoelectric material must have the trifecta properties of high thermoelectric power and electrical conductivity, and low thermal conductivity with a capability of maintaining a temperature gradient.

This combination of properties, Soni said, is hard to come by and a few semiconducting materials must be tweaked further for good thermoelectric efficiency.

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In the Western world, many automobile companies, including Volkswagen, Volvo, Ford and BMW, are developing thermoelectric waste heat recovery systems that promise three to five per cent improvement in fuel economy.

Other potential applications of thermoelectric energy harvesting include powering consumer devices and electronics, aviation, as well as space applications.

About 70 per cent of energy globally is wasted as heat and this heat is released into the environment, becoming one of the key drivers of global warming.

The trapping and conversion of waste heat into electricity can serve the dual purpose of energy self-sufficiency and environmental preservation. (IANS)