Monday November 20, 2017

IIT-Kanpur Boy Brings Home the Prestigious James Dyson Award 2017, Designs ‘Maattam’ for Efficient Transfer of Patients

The James Dyson Award runs in 23 countries and was for the first time extended to the Indian students.

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James Dyson Award
Seen here is James Dyson; the James Dyson Award is an international product design award that aims to celebrate the budding generation of design engineers. The award honors some of the most innovative product designs. Wikimedia

New Delhi, September 8, 2017 : Asish Mohandas, a product design student of IIT-Kanpur, has won the India James Dyson Award 2017 — an international design competition — for his innovative product that will help in the efficient transfer of patients from one place to the other without causing them any pain.

The product — named as “MAATTAM” a retrofit patient transfer system — works similar to a treadmill having a moving platform with a wide conveyor fabric belt and rollers on either ends.

MAATTAM being a retrofit can be put on top of any wheeled stretcher with flat top surface and height adjustment facility, converting it into a transfer stretcher.

“I resolved to design MAATTAM as I surveyed amongst doctors, nurses, ward boys to conclude that the majority of hospitals and clinics in India do not have efficient stretcher that transfers patient without any pain,” Mohandas said in a statement on Thursday.

“I wanted to design a simple, affordable and retrofit solution which would most appropriately solve the problem of patient transfer in hospitals and create a better experience, every time the patient is getting transferred. It will also ensure evading the problem of spine disorders while shifting,” Mohandas added.

The James Dyson Award runs in 23 countries and was for the first time extended to the Indian students.

Mohandas will receive £2,000 along with James Dyson Award Certificate from the James Dyson Foundation. He will now be running for the International Winner Award and prize money of £30,000.

He aims to commercialise this product and is in the process of developing the full-scale model of the retrofit stretcher which would be able to transfer an adult of height up to 180 cm and weight of maximum 95 kg.

Accompanying MAATTAM are four Indian runners-up: Eco-friendly faucet, Railroad crack detection bot, QuiSmo, and Saviour. (IANS)

Next Story

How Zero Discharge Toilet Systems can solve India’s sanitation woes

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By Rituparna Chakrobarty

In the rail budget, the Government had announced its plans to convert regular toilets into biological ones. To help government over come this challenge, Indian Institute Of Technology(IIT)-Kanpur’s Dr. Vinod Tare worked on this idea and came up with  Zero Discharge Toilet System which not only saves water but also converts human waste into fertilizers.

‘Ministry of Indian Railways approached Dr. Vinod Tare of Indian Institute Of Technology(IIT)-Kanpur and asked to develop biodegradable toilets which  avoid direct dumping of fluids on the tracks and cause less pollution. The institute invented Zero Discharge Toilet System (ZDTS), but since then no government body has approached us.’ said Rakesh Mishra, deputy project manager at IIT-K.

‘If these toilets are adopted soon into the railways then it would be a big step towards clean environment under the Swachch Bharat campaign,’ Mishra added.

What is ZDTS?

ZDTS stands Zero Discharge Toilets, and are different from other toilets which are used in houses and offices. Normal toilets discharge the effluents or water but ZDTS does not discharge any fecal matter or water or anything through it.

How does it work?

ZDTS collects all the fecal matter which is then vermicomposed. The waste becomes organic fertilizer and is free from pathogens. The amount of water which is used for flushing is very minimal and the used water gets stored into the tank for reuse. These toilets are mobile as well as stationery.

Cost and maintenance

About the cost, Mishra said that the installation charges vary from place to place like from community toilets, public toilets to railway toilets.

While talking to NewsGram, Mishra said that after the completion of ZDTS project with collaboration from UNICEF, these toilets were installed as community toilets in Aligarh for two years.

Greatest Achievement

During Maha Kumbh at Allahabad in the year 2012, approximately 300 such toilets were installed which were used by 3000-4000 people on daily basis. In 2015, on the occasion of MaghMela at Allahabad these toilets were used again to save the water body from getting polluted.

At present Samnvay, an NGO has taken the initiative to promote these toilets and help in operating and maintenance.