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Illegal Rohingyas Manage Permanent Residence Certificates (PRCs), Buy Land in Jammu

A group of Rohingyas living illegally in the Jammu have fraudulently acquired Permanent residence Certificates and bought property

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Illegal Rohingyas
Thousands of Rohingya Muslims from Myanmar have illegally settled in the state of Kashmir. Twitter

Jammu and Kashmir, June 19, 2017:

Living illegally in the Jammu and Samba district, a group of Rohingyas have fraudulently acquired Permanent Residence Certificates (PRCs) and bought land on the outskirts of Jammu Area.

The group has acquired PRCs, Aadhar Cards, and ration cards, The Tribune reported.

The local authorities have been instructed by the Intelligence Agencies to “keep a strict vigil” especially since reports have flooded in that Lashkar-e-Toiba sought to exploit these Rohingyas for executing terror acts in India as well as Bangladesh.

Sayed Hussain, a member of Rohingya group residing in Belicharana area, has managed to buy state land after acquiring ration card, Aadhar card, voter identity card and residence certificate all through fraudulent means. His residential house in Rakh Raipur is raised on the land of the Jammu Development Authority.

ALSO READ: Myanmar’s Rohingya Insurgency issues detailed list of demands this week that struck a far more pragmatic note

It is interesting to note that while the Indian citizens from other states are not entitled to PRCs in Kashmir, illegal Rohingyas from the cross-border have managed to do so.

The credibility of the authority is now a big question as it is no easy task to acquire PRCs in Kashmir especially with the process being extremely cumbersome. It is shocking how some Rohingyas have gotten past it.

Jitender Khurana, Convener of Hindu Jagran Abhiyan, states that the PDP-BJP government has been very accommodating with these Myanmar Rohingya Muslims and has been helping them with various documents such as Aadhar cards and ration cards. These Rohingyas are then committing frauds and crimes against the Indians themselves. If BJP really wants to act in favor of its own people it can stop supporting the PDP, however, due to vote bank politics, this scenario is unlikely to happen.

According to The Tribune report, a case has been registered and investigations are underway.

State Government reports from January 21 of this year estimated 5,743 Rohingyas living illegally in the state of Kashmir. Out of the total number of Rohingyas in the state, only 4,912 possess the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)

The state has already launched a campaign to deport the foreigners.

by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2393

 

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Manoj Bajpayee is an amazing actor and a team player on set: Sidharth Malhotra

Sidharth Malhotra on Thursday treated his fans to a question and answer session over Twitter.

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Actor Sidharth Malhotra
Actor Sidharth Malhotra. Wikimedia Commons

November 7, 2017: Actor Sidharth Malhotra, who will be seen sharing screen space with Manoj Bajpayee in “Aiyaary”, says the National Award winning actor is amazing and a team player.

Sidharth Malhotra on Thursday treated his fans to a question and answer session over Twitter.

A user asked the “Student Of The Year” actor about his experience working with Manoj in “Aiyaary”.

Sidharth replied: “He’s an amazing actor and a team player on set.”

“Aiyaary”, set in Delhi, London and Kashmir, revolves around two strong-minded Army officers having completely different views, yet right in their own ways. It is a real-life story based on the relationship between a mentor and a protege.

Presented by Plan C and Jayantilal Gada (Pen), the project is produced by Shital Bhatia, Dhaval Jayantilal Gada, Motion Picture Capital.

When asked about the development of the film, Sidharth replied: “Awesome. Excited to show it in a few months.”

Sidharth, 32, also described his “Brothers” co-star Akshay Kumar as his “brother from another mother.”(IANS)

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Drone and Satellites Expose Myanmar’s Pain

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Rohingya refugee
An Oct. 5, 2017 image taken from a video released by Arakan Rohingya National Organization shows villagers preparing to cross a river towards the Maungdaw township in the Rakhine state that borders Bangladesh.

London- The Rohingya refugee crisis is an age-old tale of displacement and suffering, but technology is providing new tools to tackle it, rights groups and charities said on Wednesday.

Powerful drone and satellite images are bringing to life the urgent needs of more than 800,000 Rohingya refugees who fled to Bangladesh from Myanmar, while also providing strong evidence of abuses, which could be used to lobby for justice.

“We can describe for hours the large numbers of refugees crossing the border and how quickly existing camps have expanded, but one image captures it all,” said Andrej Mahecic, a spokesman for the United Nations refugee agency (UNHCR).

More than 600,000 Rohingya have fled to neighboring Bangladesh since the military in predominantly Buddhist Myanmar launched a counter-insurgency operation after attacks on security posts by Rohingya militants in late August.

The UNHCR is using videos and photographs shot with drones to show the scale of the displacement crisis and bring it to life to spur action from the public and donors.

It is also using satellites to count and identify refugee families by their location in the Bangladesh camps to target assistance to those most in need, Mahecic told the Thomson Reuters Foundation in an email.

The use of drone footage of refugees entering Bangladesh has boosted donations for medical care, water and food, according to the Disasters Emergency Committee (DEC), an alliance of 13 leading British aid agencies.

Rights monitors also hope satellite images can provide evidence that to help bring perpetrators to justice.

Satellite photos were used in the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) to prove mass executions in 1995 in Srebrenica.

But the technology has yet to achieve its potential because of limited budgets and a lack of standardised methodologies accepted by courts, experts say.

Human Rights Watch has shared satellite images showing the burning of almost 300 villages in Myanmar, refugees’ mobile phone footage and their testimonies with the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights.

“We have found the debris field in satellite imagery where people were executed, corroborating multiple eyewitness statements,” said Josh Lyons, a satellite imagery analyst with the U.S.-based rights group.

The U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad al-Hussein has called the violence against Rohingya in Myanmar “a textbook example of ethnic cleansing,” and his office is working to determine whether it meets the legal definition of genocide.(VOA)

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‘Black Day’ Protests : Restrictions Imposed in Srinagar to keep security in check

Separatists leaders have asked people to observe October 27 as a “black day” in Kashmir.

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restrictions
police and Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) in full riot gear were seen disallowing pedestrian and vehicular movement in parts of Kashmir. (Representative image) VOA

Srinagar, October 27, 2017 : Authorities imposed restrictions in various areas on Friday to prevent separatist-called protests to mark the Accession Day of Jammu and Kashmir to India.

Joint resistance leadership (JRL) of separatist leaders — Syed Ali Shah Geelani, Mirwaiz Umer Farooq and Yasin Malik — have asked people to observe October 27 as a “black day” in Kashmir.

It was on this day in 1947 that the Indian Army landed in Srinagar Airport following the accession of the state.

“Restrictions under section 144 of CrPC will remain in force in Nowhatta, M.R.Gunj, Safa Kadal, Rainawari, Khanyar, Kralkhud and Maisuma,” a police officer said.

Heavy contingents of the state police and Central Reserve Police Force (CRPF) in full riot gear were seen disallowing pedestrian and vehicular movement in these areas.

Railway services in the valley have also been suspended on Friday as a precautionary measure. (IANS)