In Indonesia, a Jungle School helps rescued Orangutans to return to the Wild

The International Union for the Conservation of Nature - which changed the species' threat level to critical - estimates a mere 47,000 will be left in the wild by 2025

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Orangutan. Image source: Wikimedia Commons

September 5, 2016: There is an amazing jungle school in the heart of Borneo Islands that is designed specifically for the young rescued Orangutans. Some of them found wandering and suffering alone, as the fire rages huge parts of the rainforest in Borneo.

These young orphan Orangutans got to school to learn to feed themselves and avoid the predators. They are taught in the wildlife so they return to their world with no harm and with preparation. As life in the real world was drastic for these lovely creatures. Only a few years ago, the Bornean Orangutans were declared as critically endangered species and they are close to extinction.

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Experts say that the wonderful tree-dwelling Orangutans would do wonders in the wildlife and cross the Borneo without even touching the ground. But now the same Orangutans could get entirely vanished from the island within 50 years, as the ancient rainforest they have inhabited for centuries are felled and burned at alarming speed leaving serious danger for the inhabiting Orangutans.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wRf0gO54nqg&feature=youtu.be

Dr. Ayu Budi, a veterinarian is the head of the orangutan health clinic at the International animal rescue centre in the west Kalimantan province. She has something to say- “It’s heart-breaking,” she said , adding “when you see them, it’s really sad. They are supposed to be with their mother in the wild, living happily, but they are here.”

Exactly 101 Orangutans are nurtured under Dr. Budi’s care, including the 16 playful infants – are the lucky ones as they were rescued near death. In this beautiful niche of protected forest in the city of Ketapang, the young orangutans are nurtured back to life and health.

Unfortunately, hundreds of thousands of their kin have died in the past four decades across Borneo, slaughtered by hunters, burned in land-blazing fires or put to death by habitat loss.

The result has been wild orangutan populations in freefall. In the mid-1970s, nearly 300,000 of these great apes roamed Borneo. Today, just a third of that number remain.

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The International Union for the Conservation of Nature – which changed the species’ threat level to critical – estimates a mere 47,000 will be left in the wild by 2025.

The fire often gets out of hand, tearing through the forest, and smouldering relentlessly on Borneo’s compact, carbon-rich peatlands. Last year’s blazes in 2015, were among the worst on record.

Conservationists fear a repeat disaster of that scale would ring the death knell for the Bornean orangutan.

Budi and her colleagues remain optimistic, teaching orangutans like Jack – a mischievous, attention-seeking seven-year-old – to forage by hiding peanuts and honey inside plastic balls high in the treetops.

But she frets her young charge will never get the chance to prove his independence in the wild, as Borneo’s lowland forests shrink ever smaller. “I think they still have a chance, but if the forest is gone, it will be difficult,” she said.

– by Jagpreet Kaur Sandhu of NewsGram

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Responsible Human Behaviour has Helped Animals: WWF

Images from across the world have presented a very interesting picture of animals being sighted due to responsible.

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Animals
More and more animals are sighted outside as humans stay inside. Pixabay

Venice, the beautiful Italian city where nature meets culture, was recently in news, when calm returned to its overtourism-affected waters with aquatic life shining through clear canals.

Closer home, monkeys, buffalos, cows, and dogs have all come to be increasingly sighted on Indian streets, as human life remained under a tight lockdown from March-end. In Udaipur, one could spot fish swimming in the lake after decades.

Images from across the world have presented a very interesting picture – with people indoors, wild animals can be seen roaming the streets, birds sing on balconies, the dolphins have made a comeback in the rivers and the skies are blue and the air is clean, says WWF India on a campaign film ‘Our Planet, Our Home’, that visually illustrates this human-animal contrast.

The short film, that puts together visuals from across the world, is a clever satire on the idea of freedom, and how reduced human activity has led to the animal kingdom spreading its wings to territory it is kept out of.

“Any kind of development and industrial activity will have some impact on nature. What we have seen in the last few weeks, is that when human activity is decreased, and when we start behaving responsibly, we see the difference. Most of us are locked in our homes, not just because someone advised, but because we are also afraid of infection. If this responsible behavior was demonstrated against climate change, against use of plastics, today we’d live in a different space,” Dipankar Ghose, Director of the Wildlife and Habitats, WWF India told IANSlife.

Animals
Nature meets culture as animals are sighted more now say WWF. Pixabay

Adding, Himanshu Pandey, Marketing Communication Director at WWF India says that he cannot imagine life, without wildlife. “When we talk about wildlife, it’s about their habitats, their ecosystem. Without nature, no human activity – whether economic or otherwise – is possible. This contrast of us being locked up in our houses and wildlife moving about freely in urban spaces, this is a reminder of the cruciality of conservation,” he said over phone.

According to WWF’s Living Planet Report, we have lost 60 percent of wildlife populations in the last 44 years, globally. So when we step out of our houses after the lockdown, let’s ensure we protect this biodiversity and build a sustainable world where nature and people coexist. This is a film that aims to inspire individuals, businesses and governments to strengthen positive action to help build a better world for our future generations, he added.

The campaign film, which puts forth a question of coexistence as compared to human-animal competition – “what remains to be seen is whether this will continue once life returns to normal” – has been developed by McCann Bangalore and Native Films.

“In advertising, we believe that all good ideas come from simple observations or insights. This insight came from the site of animals, who were on the streets while humans were caged inside their houses. This was like a role reversal of sorts. This irony was unmistakable in a sense. It was a big lesson for humanity because we truly understood the value of freedom, and not just ours, but that of other species too. It was a timely reminder that this place we call home, is theirs too. This is the film’s message: Coexistence is the key to our survival,” Sambit Mohanty, Creative Head (South), McCann told IANSlife.

Also Read: Some Simple Tips For A Fine Bikini Line

Coexistence, as per Ghose, is more of a perception that something which is practically happening. “Animals are reclaiming, I would say, urban biodiversity has always been there, we started observing them, hearing different sounds, and appreciating them. If you want to hear these koyel sounds, we have to change certain things in our behavior,” he concludes. (IANS)

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While the Humans Are Caged Amid the Lockdown, Wildlife and Nature Enjoys

The coronavirus pandemic has surely resulted in a huge loss of lives and economy, but on the other hand the animals and the nature are enjoying their days while the humans are locked in their homes

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A photo of two peacocks approaching to eat the grains placed by villagers in a village in Noida amid the lockdown. [Photo by: Kanan Parmar]

By Kanan Parmar

How many of you remember that before the COVID-19 pandemic, the earth was facing another crisis- the environmental crisis?

Amid the lockdown, social distancing and quarantine, people across the globe have noticed drastic changes in the environment. People have reported that they can now see the sky clearer and can breathe better due to decreasing pollution levels.

According to a CNBC report, Clear water is seen in Venice’s canals due to less tourists, motorboats and pollution, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in Venice, Italy. People have also noticed fishes and dolphins in the venice’s canals after many years. 

Recent satellite images from NASA of China also showed less air pollution amid the country’s economic shutdown, due to less transportation and manufacturing, says a CNBC report.

The coronavirus pandemic has surely resulted in a huge loss of lives and economy, but on the other hand the animals and the nature are enjoying their days while the humans are locked in their homes. 

 lockdown pandemic
A dolphin swims in the Bosphorus by Galata tower, where sea traffic has nearly come to a halt on April 26, 2020, as the city of 16 million has been under lockdown since April 23rd as part of government measures to stem the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus. VOA

In the waters of the Bosphorus, dolphins are these days swimming near the shoreline in Turkey’s largest city Istanbul with lower local maritime traffic and a ban on fishing.

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A Red Panda is pictured in cherry blossom at Manor Wildlife Park in St Florence. VOA

Humans getting a photoshoot was too mainstream before the lockdown and that is why have a look at this happy Red Panda posing.

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Sheep graze as security guards patrol the prehistoric monument at Stonehenge in southern England. VOA

This picture clearly depicts how the sheeps are enjoying grazing while no human is around to litter the land.

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lockdown pandemic
This handout photo provided by Ocean Park Hong Kong on April 7, 2020 shows giant pandas Ying Ying and Le Le before mating at Ocean Park in Hong Kong. VOA

With the lockdown in force, most zoos and parks are now closed and that is why animals are now getting the privacy they wanted. You can see how happy the two pandas are while there is no disturbance.

 lockdown pandemic
Sea lions are seen on a street of Mar del Plata harbour during the lockdown imposed due to the new COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, in Mar del Plata, some 400 km south of Buenos Aires, Argentina. VOA

Well, this is a rare happening, to find sea lions on a street. The only unchanged thing about the sea lions in this photo is their laziness.

 lockdown pandemic
This aerial view handout from Thailand’s National Marine Park Operation Center in Trang taken and released on April 22, 2020 shows dugongs swimming in Joohoy cape at Libong island in Trang province in southern Thailand. VOA

When was the last time an aerial photo of a sea or water body looked so clean and greenish? Well, let the water bodies breathe until the humans are adhering to the quarantine rules.

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Flamingos are seen in a pond during a government-imposed nationwide lockdown as a preventive measure against the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus in Navi Mumbai on April 20, 2020. VOA

Before the lockdown, there was a time when these flamingos couldn’t enjoy in the pond because of the noise and environmental pollution by people visiting the pond in Navi Mumbai

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People take pictures of Pelicans at St James’s park, as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, London, Britain. VOA

Why should only humans go out for a walk to refresh themselves amid the pandemic? Pretty sure the pelicans must be thinking the same while posing for the pictures in the park.

lockdown pandemic
Deserted banks of the Sangam, the confluence of the rivers Ganges and Yamuna are seen during lockdown to control the spread of the coronavirus in Prayagraj, India. VOA

Well before the lockdown and the pandemic, the Ganga and Yamuna river were mostly known for the pollution. But now, as people haven’t been moving out of their houses, the rivers are now cleaner and even more pure.

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Wild bluebells, which bloom around mid-April turning the forest blue as they form a carpet, are pictured in the Hallerbos, also known as the “Blue Forest”, that had to be closed to groups of tourists this year due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, near Halle, Belgium. VOA

With lesser pollution, flowers and plants are now blooming even more.

Also Read- Researchers Develop New Framework To Select Best Trees For Fighting Air Pollution

The question now being raised in the minds of environmental experts is that how long will this positive effect of Coronavirus pandemic last on the environment? Is it all temporary?
Most experts believe that once the lockdown is lifted across all countries, humans may resume their normal lives and hence we will again face the environmental crisis.

It’s now “our” decision to preserve the environment and the wildlife!

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Indian School in Dubai Provides Students Free Access to CBSE Learning Resources

Indian school in Dubai gives free access to CBSE textbooks

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CBSE textbooks
An Indian High School in Dubai has given its students free access to Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) textbooks and learning resources online. (Representational Image). Pixabay

An Indian High School in Dubai has given its students free access to Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) textbooks and learning resources online for the entire duration of this term amid the coronavirus pandemic,it was reported.

The school has offered to provide 100 per cent free access to CBSE textbooks and learning resources in digital form at no additional cost to all our students for the entire duration of this term, the Khaleej Times quoted the Indian High School group of schools’ CEO, Punit MK Vasu as saying on Thursday.

The term for Indian curriculum schools begins from end of March to June.

CBSE textbooks
The school has offered to provide 100 per cent free access to CBSE textbooks and learning resources in digital form at no additional cost. Flickr

In a letter to parents, Vasu said: “This will provide significant financial relief as no costs will need to be incurred on the physical purchase of any CBSE textbooks for this entire term.

“Our students will also benefit from a digital learning app developed by an international publisher and students will have complete free access to exciting digital content including activities, assessments, videos and so much more.”

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The school will take a decision on the physical purchase of text books and the continuation of digital text books in September, depending on the prevailing health situation, explained Vasu.

He urged parents not to purchase any physical text books from third-party vendors until further notice.

Also Read- “We have Saved India from Going into Stage 3”, Says Health Minister

“We are yet to confirm minor costs, if any, on e-text books for MoE related subjects such as Moral Education, Islamic Studies and Social Studies,” he was quoted as saying in the Khaleej Times report, reiterating that the Indian High School is a not-for-profit school.

The school has also aided families directly hit by the crisis by providing “need-based admissions” to those in need. (IANS)