Sunday May 19, 2019
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In need of a spa treatment? Head to this hospital in Kochi

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Kochi: In a bid to provide five-star comforts, a multi-speciality hospital in Kochi took it up a notch when it incorporated a full-service spa in it. The 670-bed Aster Medcity hospital has sure turned eyeballs through such initiative.

The hospital has now become the cynosure of all eyes and the spa’s clients include doctors, nurses, patients and their attendants and even walk-ins.

Popular beauty expert Elizabeth Chacko, with around four decades of experience in running a string of beauty clinics in Kochi, was amused when asked if she would be interested in setting up her beauty spa at the state-of-the-art private hospital.

“Somehow, everything fell into place and the management of the Aster Medcity, where I opened my sixth beauty spa, and myself are now pleased that this new concept has clicked,” Chacko, whose brand is Kalpana Family Salon and Spa, told reporters.

“The 2,000 square-foot spa opened in December and by now, I am happy that things are going well,” added Chacko who was educated outside Kerala and plied her beauty trade in Delhi, where she learned the nuances from a senior air force officer’s wife. Since then, there’s been no looking back.

Set on a beautiful 40-acre waterfront campus, Aster Medcity hospital has as its chairman Azad Moopen, a medical professional and founder of Aster DM Healthcare – the fastest growing healthcare group in the Middle East and Africa which is now worth more than $1.1 billion.

One advantage that this hospital has is that it caters to high profile patients, a huge majority are Keralites from the Middle East, besides nationals from there too.

At the spa, everything from facials to manicure, pedicure, hair treatment and what have you, is available to the clients.

“Of course, nurses and doctors do come, as do walk-ins and patients who come for rest and recuperation at the hospital. I give them a 15 percent discount,” said the ‘beauty clinician’, adding that 50 percent of her clients are neither hospital staff nor patients.

“See, I do run five other similar spas in Kochi and hence, I have a regular clientele,” Chacko said.

Trained in the US in electrolysis and cosmetology, Chacko said that even though she has given thousands of faces a glow-up, she is, however, more pleased that she has empowered many young women by giving them training and hands-on experience for a career of their own.

With her only daughter also now helping her in the business and with the new concept of a beauty spa in a hospital that has apparently clicked beyond expectations, she has now got similar offers not just from India but abroad too.(Sanu George, IANS) (picture courtesy: vattikutitechnologies.com)

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Do You Know What All Activities Your Smartwatch Can Sense? Read Here To Find Out!

Apps might alert users to typing habits that could lead to repetitive strain injury (RSI), or assess the onset of motor impairments such as those associated with Parkinson's disease.

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To reach this conclusion, Harrison and his team began their exploration of hand activity detection by recruiting 50 people to wear specially programmed smartwatches for almost 1,000 hours while going about their daily activities. Pixabay

Smartwatches, with a few tweaks, can detect a surprising number of things your hands are doing like helping your spouse with washing dishes, chopping vegetables or petting a dog, say researchers from Carnegie Mellon University.

By making a few changes to the smartwatch’s operating system, they were able to use its accelerometer to recognise hand motions and, in some cases, bio-acoustic sounds associated with 25 different hand activities at around 95 percent accuracy.

Those 25 activities (including typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher or cutting with scissors) are just the beginning of what might be possible to detect, the researchers said.

“We envision smartwatches as a unique beachhead on the body for capturing rich, everyday activities,” said Chris Harrison, Assistant Professor in Human-Computer Interaction Institute (HCII) at Carnegie.

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Sensing hand activity also lends itself to health-related apps — monitoring activities such as brushing teeth, washing hands or smoking a cigarette.
Pixabay

“A wide variety of apps could be made smarter and more context-sensitive if our devices knew the activity of our bodies and hands,” he added.

Just as smartphones now can block text messages while a user is driving, future devices that sense hand activity might learn not to interrupt someone while they are doing certain work with their hands.

Sensing hand activity also lends itself to health-related apps — monitoring activities such as brushing teeth, washing hands or smoking a cigarette.

“Hand-sensing also might be used by apps that provide feedback to users who are learning a new skill, such as playing a musical instrument, or undergoing physical rehabilitation,” the study noted.

Apps might alert users to typing habits that could lead to repetitive strain injury (RSI), or assess the onset of motor impairments such as those associated with Parkinson’s disease.

To reach this conclusion, Harrison and his team began their exploration of hand activity detection by recruiting 50 people to wear specially programmed smartwatches for almost 1,000 hours while going about their daily activities.

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Those 25 activities (including typing on a keyboard, washing dishes, petting a dog, pouring from a pitcher or cutting with scissors) are just the beginning of what might be possible to detect, the researchers said.
Pixabay

More than 80 hand activities were labeled in this way, providing a unique dataset.

For now, users must wear the smartwatch on their active arm, rather than the passive (non-dominant) arm where people typically wear wristwatches, for the system to work.

Also Read: Facebook Creating ‘Inequalities’ Through Political Advertisements

Future experiments will explore what events can be detected using the passive arm.

Harrison and HCII PhD student Gierad Laput presented the findings at “CHI 2019”, the Association for Computing Machinery’s conference on human factors in computing systems in Glasgow, Scotland. (IANS)