Monday December 16, 2019

Inactive Ingredients in Medicines May Cause Allergy: Study

Precision care and the role for regulation and legislation are essential when it comes to labelling medications that contain an ingredient that may cause an adverse reaction

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Cervical Cancer
A woman suffering from cervical cancer takes her medicine at a treatment facility in Beijing, China, June 23, 2016. VOA

Be cautious while taking medicines as a new study suggests that some ingredients added to pills to improve their shelf life may cause allergy or lead to adverse reactions.

The study found that more than 90 per cent of all oral medications tested contained at least one ingredient including lactose, peanut oil, gluten and chemical dyes that can cause gastrointestinal issues and difficulty in breathing in sensitive individuals.

These components are added to improve the taste, shelf life, absorption and other characteristics of a pill, said researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in the US.

“There are hundreds of different versions of pills or capsules that deliver the same medication using a different combination of inactive ingredients,” said Daniel Reker from the varsity.

For the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the team analysed data on inactive ingredients in over 42,000 oral medications that contained more than 350,000 inactive ingredients.

pregnant women, measles
A nurse holds a vial of measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at Boston Children’s Hospital in Boston, Feb. 26, 2015. VOA

The findings showed a total of 38 inactive ingredients that cause allergic symptoms after oral exposure. Approximately 45 per cent of medications contained lactose, nearly 33 per cent contained a food dye, and 0.08 per cent contained peanut oil.

For certain drugs, such as progesterone, there are few alternatives that do not contain this inactive ingredient.

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“While we call these ingredients ‘inactive’, in many cases they are not. While the doses may be low, we don’t know what the threshold is for individuals to react in the majority of instances,” the researchers noted.

Precision care and the role for regulation and legislation are essential when it comes to labelling medications that contain an ingredient that may cause an adverse reaction, the team suggested. (IANS)

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Here’s the Right Way To Choose Detergent for Baby Clothes

Here's how to choose right laundry wash for babies

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Detergent
Using the wrong detergent can lead to babies experiencing skin-related issues. Pixabay

One common dilemma that most parents face is how to ensure that the detergent they use is tough on stains and odour of soiled baby clothes piling up every hour and gentle on their baby’s skin.

Health experts suggest that as a baby’s skin is not the same as an adult’s, using the same detergent can lead to babies experiencing skin-related issues. While the residual substance left behind during laundry might not impact adults, the same can affect a baby’s sensitive skin.

“Choosing a laundry wash that has natural ingredients like neem, soapnut, lemon and geranium can be safe on babies’ skin,” Dr. Subhashini N.S., Discovery Sciences Group, R&D, The Himalaya Drug Company, said in a statement.

detergent for baby clothes
Choosing a detergent that has natural ingredients like neem, soapnut, lemon and geranium can be safe on babies’ skin. Pixabay

“These ingredients are known for their antimicrobial properties and are gentle on babies’ clothes. Soapnut further helps clean the fabric and remove stains effectively,” she said.

The detergent that we choose for baby laundry needs to be gentle and help maintain the softness of the fabric. A fresh and mild fragrance post wash would be welcome, without any detergent residue, according to the experts.

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“An important aspect is to ensure that the baby laundry wash is free from harsh chemicals like phosphorous, parabens, synthetic colour, SLS/SLES/ALS (sodium lauryl sulfate/sodium laureth sulfate/ammonium lauryl sulfate), added bleach, silicates, and fluorescent. It’s better to opt for a laundry wash that is clinically tested, gentle on baby’s skin, and does not leave behind any residue,” Subhashini said.

Harsh chemicals can affect a baby’s skin, leading to allergies and rashes. If you notice any signs of irritation, rashes, or allergy on your baby’s skin, do consult a medical professional immediately, she advised. (IANS)