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Bhumi has a couple of heroine-centric projects lined up over the next few months. Wikimedia Commons

Actress Bhumi Pednekar is busier than ever, and she says that an increase in professional responsibility and fan frenzy is a happy problem for any actor.

“When you want to become an actor, you dream that your responsibility increases, that your fan-following and their love for you increases. You want to keep them happy and satisfied with your films, so it’s a happy problem to have,” Said Bhumi.


Last year was fabulous for the actress. Her roles in “Saand Ki Aankh”, “Bala” and “Pati Patni Aur Woh” were universally applauded, and she has great roles coming up. “2019 was really a special year because my films were appreciated by the audience. I am getting the love and respect at award ceremonies as well,” said Bhumi, at NexBrands Brand Vision Summit and Awards 2020.

At Filmfare Awards this year, where she shared the Best Actress (Critics’ Choice) trophy with her “Saand Ki Aankh” co-star Taapsee Pannu, there has been major controversy over “Gully Boy” sweeping the awards. Twitterati slammed the decision and #BoycottFilmare began trending.


Actress Bhumi Pednekar is busier than ever, and she says that an increase in professional responsibility and fan frenzy is a happy problem for any actor. IANS

On the controversy, Bhumi said: “I feel each body or panel takes its decision, so I don’t think I am in a place to comment about what is right or wrong. We (Taapsee and Bhumi) won the award in critic’s category, which was decided by jury. I am thankful for that.”

Bhumi has a couple of heroine-centric projects lined up over the next few months. There is the horror thriller “Durgavati”, her first solo release as a heroine. The film directed by G. Ashok, is based on his 2018 Telugu film “Bhaagamathie”. Bhumi reprises the role of an IAS officer that was played by Anushka Shetty in the original.

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She is also waiting for the release of “Dolly Kitty Aur Woh Chamakte Sitare”, directed by “Lipstick Under My Burkha” maker Alankrita Shrivastava. The film co-stars Konkona Sen Sharma and was screened at the prestigious Busan International Film Festival. (IANS)


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