Tuesday February 19, 2019
Home India India aims fo...

India aims for 200-ship fleet by 2027, says Navy vice chief P. Murugesan

0
//
080705-N-2735T-887 ATLANTIC OCEAN (July 5, 2008) The ships of the Nassau Strike Group (NASSG) transit westward in the Atlantic Ocean as they wrap-up their deployment to the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. The NASSG is made up of the Norfolk, Va.-based amphibious assault ship USS Nassau (LHA 4); the amphibious transport dock ship USS Nashville (LPD 13); the amphibious dock landing ship USS Ashland (LSD 48); the guided-missile destroyers USS Ross (DDG 71) and USS Bulkeley (DDG 84); and the Mayport, Fla.-based guided-missile cruiser USS Philippine Sea (CG 58). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Coleman Thompson (Released)

Vice_Admiral_P._MurugesanNew Delhi: India aims at having a 200-ship fleet by 2027, which is the end year of its 30-year-perspective plan, Navy vice chief P. Murugesan said on Tuesday.

Vice Admiral Murugesan however admitted that the navy, which has been leading in domestic production in defence sector, lags behind in production of fight components.

Noting the navy presently has 137 ships and submarines, he said: “By 2027, the aspiration is 200 ships… but even for going to 150 from 137, a lot of efficiency is required.”

The maritime capability perspective plan of the Indian Navy envisages a 198-ship navy by 2027.

As the navy plans a seminar on ‘Make in India’ with industry chamber Confederation of Indian Industries (CII), he said India has achieved 90 percent indigenisation in float component, 60 percent indigenisation in move component but the fight component is still just 30 percent indigenised.

“Fight component is still lagging behind,” he said.

Vice Admiral Murugesan however said a lot of private industries are coming forward, and the environment is conducive for them to grow.

Asked about the shortage of helicopters in the navy, the vice chief said that there are plans for acquisition.

He acknowledged the shortage worried him but quickly added: “We have plans for acquisition of helicopters. It will go through several processes”. (IANS)

Next Story

Low Cure Rate For Childhood Cancer in India: Experts

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner

0
Term insurance
Health insurance covers only for hospitalization and doesn’t necessarily cover the medical expenses incurred for the treatment of major illnesses. flickr

Childhood cancer comprises almost 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India, experts said here on Friday, expressing concern over the low cure rate due to lack of available data.

“The disturbing reality is that the cure rate of pediatric cancer is almost 80 per cent in the developed countries. When we see the data from major cancer centres, it actually can match up to the Western standard but this data is not enough,” Haemato-Oncologist Vivek Agarwala said at an awareness programme conducted by Narayana Superspecialty Hospital, Howrah.

According to the Indian Council for Medical Research, cancer in children constitutes approximately 3-5 per cent of the total cancer cases in India.

Agarwala said a large portion of the incidence of childhood cancer in society is still not addressed.

Cancer survivor. Flickr

Also, a large section who don’t have access to premier institutes are often diagnosed late due to financial crunch and that is why the overall treatment rate in India is low.

“Probably, the government and society at large are not considering it a big problem as it is just around 5 per cent. We are always campaigning for breast and cervical cancers,” Agarwala said.

“We must remember this 5 per cent of cancer is majorly curable if given proper treatment,” he said.

Leukaemia and retinoblastoma (a form of cancer where children have a white eye) are the two common forms of cancer in children.

Also Read- Push-ups Can Lower The Risk of Heart Diseases

Talking about awareness and symptoms that parents need to watch out for, he said: “Symptoms are different for different cancers, but children who have cancer have poor growth, poor weight gain and decreased appetite. One must get their children evaluated on seeing these symptoms”.

On International Childhood Cancer Day, the hospital organised a ‘Sit and Draw competition’ with pediatric patients and rewarded the winner. (IANS)