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India-Bahrain Art Exchange: The event in New Delhi to Feature Work of 30 Artists from across the World

Indian art scene is considered among the most developed in the region with great talent, therefore, India will be a huge platform for artists to showcase the artwork of Bahraini artists

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Encouragement of Indian artists and Bahraini artists
A painter working for Islamic Art annual fair. Wikimedia
  • Rouble Nagi has teamed up with Kaneka Sabharwal to show an initiative, that aims at connecting creative enthusiasts from Bahrain and India
  • The event will be conducted later this year, in Mumbai and New Delhi 
  • The event is set to feature work of around 30 artists including the significant presence of Bahraini female artists 

New Delhi, August 17, 2017: Indian art doesn’t seem to show any signs of abatement in the international art world, and eminent artist and philanthropist, Rouble Nagi is all pumped up to show the master that she is.

Rouble Nagi Art Foundation has teamed up with Kaneka Sabharwal to show an initiative, first of its kind, that welcomes contemporary artists from the entire world and aims at connecting creative enthusiasts from Bahrain and India through an unparalleled exchange program. The initiative is supported by the government of India.

“I was very keen to create something that will fall in line with the emergent global consciousness that has entered the international art scene. I wanted to introduce the world to contemporary Indian art and bring global art to the country so that the relationship with art is much more intimate and undeviating. The event won’t be limited to showcasing art but also consists of art-talks so as to open a dialogue between international artists,” mentioned Rouble Nagi, in the ANI report.

“This initiative aims to give a platform to Bahraini and Indian artists, exposing them to local and international aspirational values, as well as creating economic capital from the cultural capital,” she added.

ALSO READ: Indian art gaining worldwide recognition. 

The event which is to be conducted later this year in Mumbai and New Delhi will be held under the patronage of Her Royal Highness Princess Sabeeka Bint Ibrahim Al Khalifa, wife of the King of Bahrain, President of The Supreme Council For Women ArtBab. She produces art on an iPad, and is going to visit India for the very first time.

The event is all set to feature work of around 30 artists, ranging from impressive video art installations, eclectic pop art, to contemporary sculptures and the significant presence of Bahraini female artists.

Balqees Fakhro, Faika Al Hasan, Jamal Abdul Rahim, Khalid Farhan, Lulwa Al Khalifa, Nabeela Al Khayer and Omar Al Rashid are some of the Bahraini artists who will be showcasing their works.

There will also be an exhibition of the artistic dexterity of the underprivileged children, who are supported by the Rouble Nagi Art Foundation.

Kaneka Sabharwal, Co-Founder of ArtBAB and Founder of Art Select and Jonathan Watkins of Birmingham’s Ikon Gallery, who is also chair of ArtBAB’s international selection committee, will be the curator of the event.

“Bahrain, which traces its roots to one of the oldest civilizations in the world, the Dilmun Empire, has a rich history of art and many historians assert that the art came to the kingdom of Bahrain from India. The Bahrainis are known to have some of the best art collections and I want to introduce art collectors and enthusiasts around the world to the talent of Bahraini artists,” noted Kaneka, who moved to Bahrain in 2009.

According to Dr. E M Janaki, CEO Tamkeen, art sector has not only locally but across the region, achieved importance as an engine of economic growth.

ALSO READ: Indian art: The folkish inclination 

Indian art scene is considered among the most developed in the region with great talent, therefore, India will be a huge platform for artists to showcase the artwork of Bahraini artists.

The vision is to bring together an art alliance that isn’t limited by geographies and widens the conception of art, in regard to which, the multi-cultural arty affair will be host to a bevy of notable guests from various spheres, including political and corporate.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha

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Indian Artists Demand Internet Giants to Change Stance on Nudity

Its policy team, along with artists, art educators, museum curators, activists as well as Facebook employees, has decided to examine how to better serve artists, including considering a new approach to nudity guidelines

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FILE - Attendees walk past a Facebook logo during Facebook Inc's F8 developers conference in San Jose, California, United States. VOA

By Radhika Parashar

As artists across the world take to streets against the social networking platforms’ unfair policies towards art-based nudity, the Indian community of artists has come out in their support, detailing their own experiences and demanding the digital platforms to have a clear differentiation between vulgarity and art.

In a protest this month, nearly 100 people stripped naked holding pictures of nipples in their hands in front of Facebook’s New York headquarters, demanding allowance to showcase artistic nudity on the popular apps. The campaign was outlandishly titled #WeTheNipple.

Another protest in June saw international porn artists gather outside Instagram’s Silicon Valley headquarters, describing the nudity-censorship rules of Facebook and its family of apps “vague, inconsistent and threatening to their livelihood”.

The move has been hailed by international photographers, painters, models and screen artists from around the world. including in India.

“I obviously understand that Facebook and Instagram want to avoid ‘vulgar’ content on their platforms, but scrapping off art-based nudity is affects artists very seriously,” fashion photographer Soumya Iyer told IANS.

“Just like everyone else, we also want to showcase our work and build ourselves our own brand on Facebook and Instagram because of their global reach and popularity but it’s sad that fine-art is neither accepted nor respected,” said Rohan Tulpule, a fine art photographer who has faced consequences of ‘unfair’ censorship rules against his work multiple times.

Recollecting her own experiences on suffering damages, Iyer said: “My series called ‘gender of beauty’ was taken down because of the display of nipples. Instagram is such a huge platform and artists can really make use of its power of engagement! I don’t understand why the display of a woman’s nipple has become a matter of shame”.

Known for his bold photo-series like “Life Through Holes” and “The Plus Size Of Life,” Tulpule added: “Hashtags help us increase our reach but if we use hashtags like #fineart and #nudephotograph, our post comes into notice and gets deleted under ‘policy violation’. We get restricted from all activities on the platforms. The platforms have to understand that all nudity is not vulgarity”.

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FILE – The WhatsApp app logo is seen on a smartphone in this picture illustration. VOA

According to conceptual performance artist Inder Salim, “nothing is more scary when imaginary uniform sets of rules are imposed on all to suppress all those atavistic tendencies in us.”

As part of its community guidelines, Facebook-owned Instagram says “for a variety of reasons, we don’t allow nudity” on their platform — including “photos, videos, and some digitally-created content that show sexual intercourse, genitals and close-ups of fully-nude buttocks. It also includes some photos of female nipples.”

However, the platform fails to elaborate the exact extent of “some photos” of female nipples it discourages on its app.

Last week, Facebook was slammed for banning Grammy-nominated British rock band Led Zeppelin’s 1973 album “Houses of the Holy” cover that features nude children. Later, admitting that the image was “culturally significant”, Facebook restored the image.

Also Read: How to Keep Your Hair Healthy When it’s Long

According to actor-model Milind Soman, who stirred major controversies after he stripped naked for a photo-shoot way back in 1995, accepted that tough social media policies that lack distinction between artistic and vulgar nudity is not favourable for artists in this digital era.

“It’s their platform, their policies and their call. What is artistic and what is vulgar on their platform is up to them to decide because after all, it is their business to be profitable (first),” Soman told IANS.

The global demonstrations have convinced Facebook to re-think its stance on artistic nudity.

Its policy team, along with artists, art educators, museum curators, activists as well as Facebook employees, has decided to examine how to better serve artists, including considering a new approach to nudity guidelines. (IANS)