Tuesday September 18, 2018
Home India India celebra...

India celebrates Makar Sankranti

0
//
154
Republish
Reprint

New Delhi: Makar Sankranti, an Indian festival was celebrated in many parts of India and Nepal. It is a harvest festival which is basically celebrated in the Hindu communities. In India, the states of Bihar, Bengal, Punjab, Maharashtra, Gujarat, Rajasthan and Tamil Nadu celebrate the festival with great fervor and zeal.

In Tamil Nadu the festival is known as Pongal, in Assam as Bhogali Bihu, in Punjab, as Lohiri, in Gujarat and Rajasthan, as Uttararayan.

Makar Sankranti marks the transition of the sun into the zodiacal sign of Makara (Capricon). It is that one day when the duration of the day and night are of equal durations and after this day, the days become longer and the nights shorter. It also marks the arrival of spring in India. It is one of the few festivals which falls on the same Georgian calendar date every year i.e. 14 January, with few exceptions when it comes on 15 January 2016 being one of them.

Makar Sankranti is a blissful festival celebrated by Hindus. All enthusiasts step out of their houses and enjoy flying kites. Colourful kites fill the sky on the auspicious day of Sankranti. The significance of Makar Sankranti is greater in Maharashtra. People send greeting cards to their friends and relatives. The day is started by offering prayers to various deities. People visit temples to bow their heads in front of supreme power.(Inputs from Purti Kalra)(Image-makarsankranti.co)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

India’s PSLV Along With 2 British Satellites Launched Successfully

Two satellites aboard the PSLV belong to Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd (SSTL), UK, and is carried under commercial arrangement with Antrix Corp Ltd - the commercial arm of ISRO.

0
Indian rocket lifts off with two earth observation satellites from UK
Indian rocket lifts off with two earth observation satellites from UK. Flickr

Indian rocket Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) lifted off successfully with two British satellites, NovaSAR and S1-4, from the rocket port here on Sunday night.

The PSLV-CA (Core Alone) version, standing 44.4 metres tall and weighing 230.4 tonnes, with thick orange flame at its tail lighting up the night skies rose up at 10.08 p.m. from the first launch pad.

The rocketport here has two launch pads.

PSLV
Indian rocket Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle  lifts off with two British satellites NovaSAR and S1-4, as seen from Chennai. IANS

According to the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), after 17 minutes, 44 seconds following the PSLV lift-off, the two earth observation satellites will be launched into a 583 km sun synchronous orbit.

NovaSAR weighing 445 kg is a S-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar satellite intended for forest mapping, land use and ice cover monitoring, flood and disaster monitoring.

 

PSLV
Indian rocket Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle  lifts off with two British satellites NovaSAR and S1-4, as seen from Chennai on Sept 16. IANS

S1-4 weighing 444 kg is a high resolution Optical Earth Observation Satellite, used for surveying resources, environment monitoring, urban management and for disaster monitoring.

 

Also Read: ISRO Expects to Fly Its First Small Rocket Sometime Next Year

Two satellites aboard the PSLV belong to Surrey Satellite Technologies Ltd (SSTL), UK, and is carried under commercial arrangement with Antrix Corp Ltd – the commercial arm of ISRO. (IANS)

Next Story