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India Faces High Impact of Hacking in APAC Region: Tech Report

Larger organizations were prone to more cyber incidents but organizations with more than 500 staff suffered an average of 209 incidents, which is almost 8 times higher than businesses with 50 to 100 employees, said the report

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A man takes part in a hacking contest during the Def Con hacker convention in Las Vegas, Nevada, on July 29, 2019. VOA

India is most likely to have “high” impact (58 per cent) of cybersecurity incidents on the business compared to Singapore (42 per cent) and Australia (16 per cent), a new report said on Tuesday.

The report by cloud cybersecurity company McAfee revealed that an enterprise faced up to 120 data breaches on an average in the past year, with the respondents across Asia-Pacific (APAC) region, estimating an average loss of $298,812.

Interestingly, when asked whether they could put a cost on their recent cyber incidents, Indian organizations led with 91 per cent believing that they were able to quantify the financial impact.

Owing to high hacking risk, 93 per cent organisations in India believe they are cyber-resilient, taking the top position among all the other countries in the APAC region.

“Organizations in India are most likely to have ‘high’ impact of cybersecurity incidents. Therefore, involvement of cybersecurity in digital transformation at the management level becomes critical in more developed jurisdictions such as India, where regulation and compliance are evolving and, therefore, may be more of a focus for organisations,” explained Sanjay Manohar, Managing Director, McAfee India.

Organisations in India describe their culture of cybersecurity as either “strategic” (60 per cent) or “embedded” (33 per cent).

The survey covered 480 cybersecurity decision-makers across eight Asia-Pacific countries including Australia, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, New Zealand, Singapore and Thailand.

To protect your digital self, you shouldn’t reveal your real name and data on high-risk websites. Pixabay

It revealed that 97 per cent of the organizations in India were familiar with the concept of cyber-resilience compared to Australia (73 per cent) and New Zealand (75 per cent).

“Nearly 98 per cent Indian enterprises are likely to invest more in security due to regulation, despite the maturity of their jurisdiction,” the findings showed.

Data breach (62 per cent), data tampering (49 per cent) and fraud (43 per cent), were predicted to be the top three risks enterprises will be prone to in 2021.

Investment in categories such as data protection, cloud protection technology and network protection technology were top priorities for enterprises targeting an “optimized” cybersecurity maturity posture.

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“As the cyber threat landscape continues to evolve, cybersecurity is fast becoming an integral part of digital transformation, with 49 per cent ‘extremely’ involved and 41 per cent ‘very involved’ in the digital transformation process,” said the report.

Data breach (62 per cent), data tampering (49 per cent) and fraud (43 per cent), were predicted to be the top three risks enterprises in 2021.

The findings also show that in 2021, new risks will spread through a range of other potential issues such as an increase in fraud (23 per cent – 30 per cent) and defacement (24 per cent – 28 per cent).

Larger organizations were prone to more cyber incidents but organizations with more than 500 staff suffered an average of 209 incidents, which is almost 8 times higher than businesses with 50 to 100 employees, said the report. (IANS)

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Monitoring Method May Help To Conserve Lions in India

In the new study, Keshab Gogoi and his colleagues have demonstrated an alternative method for monitoring Asiatic lions

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Lions
Conserving this sub-specie of lions with the use of best scientific methods is a global priority and responsibility, according to authors of the study from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII). Pixabay

An alternative method of monitoring endangered lions in India can help improve estimates of their numbers and also in making informed conservation policy and management decisions.

New conservation practices have helped increase the number of Asiatic lions from 50 to 500 in the Gir Forests of Gujarat.

Accurate estimates are needed for better conservation efforts, according to a study published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The existing methods, particularly a technique known as total counts, can miss some and double-count others. Also, they provide limited information on the spatial density.

Conserving this sub-specie of lions with the use of best scientific methods is a global priority and responsibility, according to authors of the study from the Wildlife Institute of India (WII).

In the new study, Keshab Gogoi and his colleagues have demonstrated an alternative method for monitoring Asiatic lions.

“Our research addresses this priority by developing a robust approach to their population assessment and monitoring, which can be used for all lion populations across the world,” said an author.

Gogoi and colleagues used whisker patterns and permanent body marks to identify lions using a computer programme, and analysed the data with a mathematical modelling method known as ‘spatially explicit capture recapture’ to estimate the lion density.

They also assessed the prey density and other factors that could influence the lion density.

Lion, Predator, Dangerous, Mane, Big Cat, Male, Zoo
An alternative method of monitoring endangered lions in India can help improve estimates of their numbers and also in making informed conservation policy and management decisions. Pixabay

The researchers identified 67 lions of the 368 sightings within the 725 sq km study area in the Gir Forests, estimating an overall density of 8.53 lions per 100 sq km. They found the prey density didn’t appear to influence the lion density variations in the study area.

The lion density was higher in the flat valley habitats (as opposed to rugged or elevated areas) and near sites where food had been placed to attract lions for tourists to see them.

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The study suggests that baiting lions for tourism affects their natural density patterns, in line with other researches that baiting disrupts lion behaviour and social dynamics.

The authors said the alternative monitoring method could be used to assess lions across their range (in India and Africa) and better conservation efforts. (IANS)