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Survey: India is Still Far Away from Achieving its Goal of Zero Hunger

It notes India now suffers from the double burden of undernutrition and overnutrition

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It notes India now suffers from the double burden of undernutrition and overnutrition. Wikimedia Commons

A recent nutritional survey in India finds the country is still far away from achieving its goal of zero hunger for its populous country of more than one billion. The report was jointly produced by the U.N. World Food Program and the India’s Ministry of Statistics and Program Implementation.

The report, the first of its kind, provides an intimate look into the progress being made in improving the nutritional status of India’s 1.3 billion people by addressing the country’s severe food shortages. While progress is being made toward this goal, World Food Program spokesman, Herve Verhoosel said India is still far away from wiping out hunger in the country.

“The report indicates that despite positive trends and patterns in improving food security, malnutrition rates are well below acceptable levels, with large numbers of people, especially women and children, suffering from Vitamin A, iron and iodine deficiency,” said Verhoosel.

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FILE – A child eats a pomegranate collected from waste at a slum area on the outskirts of Jammu, India, Oct. 12, 2018. VOA

The report indicates stunting (low height-for-age) has declined by one fifth in India during the last decade. Nevertheless, it notes 6.4 percent of children under five are both stunted and wasted (low weight-for-height) and also are underweight. A much larger percentage, 18.1 percent of children are both stunted and underweight. These conditions are a result of insufficient nutrient intake and frequent infections. Stunting can cause irreversible physical and mental impairment and wasting can lead to death in children under five.

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The report finds the prevalence of malnutrition in children between six months and five years has declined, but that of acute malnutrition, or wasting, has marginally increased. It notes India now suffers from the double burden of undernutrition and overnutrition.

In the last decade, it says the prevalence of low body mass index has decreased by more than one-third in both women and men. During the same period, it says overweight and obesity have increased from 13 to 21 percent among women and from nine to 19 percent among men. (VOA)

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Only 3% Indian Digital Marketers Calculate ROI Correctly: LinkedIn

According to a report by LinkedIn only 3% Indian digital marketers measure ROI correctly

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LinkedIn report
LinkedIn report says that very few Indian Digital Marketers can calculate ROI correctly. Pixabay

When it comes to measuring return on investment (ROI), only 3 per cent of digital marketers in India are calculating ROI correctly — one of the lowest among all regions and lower than the global average of 4 per cent, a LinkedIn report said on Wednesday.

While 78 per cent digital marketers in India claim to be measuring digital ROI long before a sales cycle has concluded, only 3 per cent of digital marketers are measuring ROI over a six-month period or longer.

This means that many marketers are likely not measuring ROI at all, said the ‘The Long and Short of ROI’ report by Microsoft-owned professional networking platform conducted among 4,000 marketing professionals across 19 countries, including India.

“The report highlights how Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance; they are thinking short-term and are measuring KPIs (Key Performance Indicators) instead of ROI,” said says Virginia Sharma, Director, Marketing Solutions – India, LinkedIn.

“Measuring too quickly can have a poor impact on campaigns, specifically in industries such as higher education and real estate where it can take months of consideration before sale,” Sharma added.

Most Indian marketers measure ROI within the first 30 days of the campaign, which results in an inaccurate reflection of the actual return, considering that sales cycles are 60-90 days or longer.

Measuring ROI- LinkedIn
The LinkedIn report found that Indian marketers are struggling to measure the true impact of performance. Pixabay

Fifty per cent digital marketers rely on inaccurate metrics and use cost-per-click as their ROI metric, which does not show impact-per-advertising dollar spent.

As opposed to 58 per cent globally, 64 per cent Indian marketers acknowledged that they needed to show ROI numbers to justify spend and get approval for future budget asks.

This clearly shows how pressured Indian digital marketers are internally, hence rushing to measure and prove ROI, the report noted.

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While 60 per cent of Indian marketers who measure ROI in the short term end up having budget reallocation discussions within a month, 47 per cent of Indian digital marketers don’t feel confident about their ROI measurements today, the report added.

With over 60 million users, India is LinkedIn’s fastest-growing and largest market outside the US. (IANS)