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Traffic in urban India.

India is opening up too fast and too soon is the majority view as the government expresses concern over crowds at hill stations, as per the IANS CVoter Live Tracker. Prime Minister Narendra Modi recently said that crowds at tourist spots are worrying.

To a question on if India is opening too soon and too fast, 53.31 percent of the respondents of the IANS CVoter Live Tracker said 'yes', while 34.34 percent said that India is not opening up too fast but people are becoming careless. Compared to other states, the Covid-19 cases in Kerala are not decreasing rapidly. To a question, if Kerala could become the epicenter of the third Covid wave in India, 45.97 percent said 'yes' and 35.91 percent said 'no'.

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The tacker had a sample size of 1,314. The CVoter NewsTracker Surveys in India are based on a national representative random probability sample as used in the globally standardized RDD CATI methodology, covering all geographic and demographic segments across all states.


covid 19 Mumbai traffic.Wikimedia Commons


This daily live tracker survey is based on interviews of adult (18+) respondents across all socio-economic segments. The data is weighted to the known Census profile. The standard margin of error is +/- 3 percent at national trends and +/- 5 percent at regional/zonal trends with a 95 percent confidence level.

As many as 50.56 percent of respondents in the tracker said that younger leaders from smaller states like Anurag Thakur and Kiren Rijiju can hope to become national leaders, or even the Prime Minister a few years later. A total of 35.67 percent of respondents said that it is very difficult for younger leaders like Thakur and Rijiju to emerge as national leaders and even more difficult for them to become Prime Minister in a few years.

ALSO READ: Motherhood in The Times of COVID-19

As many as 45.61 percent of the respondents said that young India needs young politicians and a young Cabinet, while 41.56 percent said India doesn't need just young politicians and young Cabinet, but a combination of young and experienced leaders. To a question in the survey on if India needs younger and dynamic leaders as Governors instead of retired politicians, 51.05 percent said 'yes, while 37.65 percent said India needs a combination of young and experienced politicians to hold the Governor's post.

To a question on if India should crackdown on Twitter for not complying with Indian laws, a huge majority of more than 70 percent said 'yes. An overwhelming majority are still wearing masks as 75.06 percent said they wear masks when they go out while 18.31 percent said they don't wear a mask. (IANS/KB)


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