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India: Mizoram Starts an Awareness Campaign on Climate Change

Himalayan communities are generally more vulnerable to climate change because they have fewer livelihood options

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Mizoram, Awareness, Climate Change
The government took action after a report stated that Assam, Mizoram and Jammu and Kashmir are among the 12 Himalayan states in India that are extremely vulnerable. Pixabay

The Mizoram government has launched an awareness campaign across the state on climate change and global warming, officials said on Wednesday.

The government took action after a report stated that Assam, Mizoram and Jammu and Kashmir are among the 12 Himalayan states in India that are extremely vulnerable to global warming and climate change.

The Mizoram Remote Sensing Application Centre (MIRSAC) and Deputy Commissioners of various districts are organising awareness campaigns involving government officials, NGOs, media persons, academicians, village council leaders and students, said a state Directorate of Information and Public Relations (DIPR) official.

Addressing an awareness-cum-workshop in Lunglei district on Tuesday, Lunglei Deputy Commissioner K. Lalrinzuali said that India’s 12 Himalayan states, especially Assam, Mizoram and Jammu and Kashmir, are the most vulnerable to climate change.

Mizoram, Awareness, Climate Change
The Mizoram government has launched an awareness campaign across the state on climate change and global warming. Pixabay

“Himalayan communities are generally more vulnerable to climate change because they have fewer livelihood options, limited infrastructure and a high dependence on natural resources,” she said while referring to a recent study conducted by the Indian Institute of Technology-Mandi, IIT-Guwahati and Indian Institute of Science, Bengaluru.

Stressing on the gravity of the present situation, Lalrinzuali told people to plant more trees, use natural resources judiciously and adopt simple eco-friendly habits in their daily routines, a DIPR statement said.

Speaking at the event, Chief Scientific Officer of Mizoram’s Directorate of Science and Technology, R.K. Lallianthanga, highlighted the various initiatives and projects undertaken by his department to deal with the situation arising out of climate change.

According to an official of Tripura Science, Technology and Environment Department, states having low per capita income, low area under irrigation and low area under forests per 1,000 households and high area under open forests received a high vulnerability score in the joint study.

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“Assam has the least area under irrigation, least forest area available per 1,000 rural households and the second lowest per capita income among the other IHR (Indian Himalayan Region) states, and thus scores the highest vulnerability score,” the official said on condition of anonymity.

Based on this assessment, the vulnerability index was found to be the highest for Assam (0.72) and Mizoram (0.71), followed by Jammu and Kashmir (0.62), Manipur (0.59), Meghalaya and West Bengal (both 0.58), Nagaland (0.57), Himachal Pradesh and Tripura (both 0.51), Arunachal Pradesh (0.47) and Uttarakhand (0.45).Sikkim is the least vulnerable state with the index being 0.42.

The Himalayas are the largest and tallest mountain range in the world, bordering five countries and covering an area of about 43 lakh sq km.

Nearly 1.5 billion people depend on the Himalayas for water, food and energy. The Himalayan ecosystem is considered as extremely fragile and diverse but vital for India. (IANS)

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Great Barrier Reef Facing Unprecedented Challenges Amid Serious Ecological Disturbances

In light of the report, the World Wide Fund for Nature-Australia called for urgent climate change action

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great barrier reef
"The Great Barrier Reef is still beautiful and it is resilient, but it is facing unprecedented challenges," AIMS Chief Executive Officer Paul Hardisty said. Wikimedia Commons

The health of Australias Great Barrier Reef is facing unprecedented challenges amid serious ecological disturbances, a report released on Thursday said. Crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks — which have decimated breeding populations of corals over large areas — coral bleaching and cyclones were among the “major disturbances” in the past five years that have caused a general decline in coral cover in the world’s largest living organism, Efe news quoted the report by the Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) as saying.

“The Great Barrier Reef is still beautiful and it is resilient, but it is facing unprecedented challenges,” AIMS Chief Executive Officer Paul Hardisty said. The report added that chronic stressors such as high turbidity, higher ocean temperatures and changing ocean chemistry affect recovery rates and more frequent disturbances shorten periods of recovery time.

“We know reefs can recover given time and the right conditions, but there has been little relief from disturbances in recent years to allow significant recovery to occur,” AIMS Long Term Monitoring Program leader and ecologist Mike Emslie said.

great barrier reef
In light of the report, the World Wide Fund for Nature-Australia called for urgent climate change action. Wikimedia Commons

The decline was measured in the central and southern areas of the reef, while the northern region has stabilized. In light of the report, the World Wide Fund for Nature-Australia called for urgent climate change action. “Australia must urgently reduce its dependency on fossil fuels and rapidly speed up the transition to a renewable economy,” WWF-Australia Head of Oceans Richard Leck said.

ALSO READ: Global Warming Threatens UN Goals of Tackling Inequality, Conflicts

Last month, a Change.org campaign was launched to push for citizenship for the Great Barrier Reef. The petition demands the reef be given rights akin to that of humans, including the right to health, freedom from torture or inhuman treatment or punishment, the right to maintain own means of subsistence and the right to life.

The Great Barrier Reef, home to 400 types of coral, 1,500 species of fish and 4,000 varieties of molluscs, began to deteriorate in the 1990s due to the double impact of water warming and increased acidity due to more carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. (IANS)