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India now the leading market of smartphones in Asia

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New Delhi: With an increase of 28.8% in 2015 as compared to the year 2014, around 10.36 crore smartphones have been shipped to India, thus making it the fastest growing smartphones market in the Asia Pacific region.

According to International Data Corporation (IDC), “Quarterly Mobile Phone Tracker”, 2.46 crore smartphones were shipped in India in the fourth quarter of the year 2015.An increase of 15.4% as compared to 2014 when 2.22 crore units were shipped in the country during the same period.

“The online share of smartphone shipments continued to ramp further as the fourth quarter of 2015 saw online mega sales from major e-traders like Flipkart, Snap deal and Amazon,” said Karthik J, senior market analyst, client devices.

“Online share spiked to 37.3% in the fourth quarter of 2015, growing 2.5 times over the same period last year with almost half of the contribution coming from online exclusive models,” Karthik added.

The report said the smartphone market in China has begun to slow down and most vendors especially the Chinese, are now looking for avenues to leverage on India’s growth potential in the smartphone market.

“Chinese vendors’ smartphone shipment spiked with 71% growth in the fourth quarter of 2015 over last year,” added Jaipal Singh, market analyst, client devices.

Singh further added that “good quality, big discounts by e-traders and higher specification at lower prices are few key factors for which Chinese smartphones are preferred over others especially in $100-$300 (Rs 6840-Rs 20523) price band.”

With the advancement and success of the “Make in India” campaign, Singh said that almost one in two smartphones shipped in the fourth quarter of 2015 were manufactured in India with Samsung leading with the highest shipments.

Similarly, 4G smartphones shipment spiked to 1.39 crore units accounting for more than half of the market in the fourth quarter of 2015.

“4G-based smartphone shipments surpassed 3G volume for the first time during the last quarter of the year, primarily led by Samsung and Lenovo together accounting for more than half of 4G volumes,” Karthik noted. (IANS)

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Social media use may affect teenagers’ real life relationship

The study showed that teenagers from families with a household income of less than $35,000 per year spent three more hours a day on screen media watching TV and online videos than teenagers in families with an annual income of more than $100,000

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The increased use of social media has led to many differences among teenagers.
The increased use of social media has led to many differences among teenagers. Wikimedia Commons
Even as effects of social media use on mental well-being is hotly debated, a new study says that spending too much time online can create problems in real life relationships with teenagers and vice versa.
Results of a survey conducted by Professor Candice Odgers of the University of California, Irvine and her colleagues showed teenagers from low-income families reported more physical fights, face-to-face arguments and trouble at school that spilt over from social media.
On the other hand, the researchers found that adolescents from economically disadvantaged households are also more likely to be bullied and victimised in cyberspace.
“The majority of young people appear to be doing well in the digital age, and many are thriving with the new opportunities that electronic media provides. But those who are already struggling offline need our help online too,” Odgers said.
In a commentary published in the journal Nature, Odgers argued that while smartphones should not be seen as universally bad, vulnerable teenagers experience greater negative effects on life online.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds. Wikimedia Commons
“What we’re seeing now may be the emergence of a new kind of digital divide, in which differences in online experiences are amplifying risks among already vulnerable adolescents,” said Odgers, who is also a fellow in Canadian Institute for Advanced Research’s Child & Brain Development programme.
For the last 10 years, Odgers has been tracking adolescents’ mental health and their use of smartphones.
In her survey of North Carolina schoolchildren, 48 percent of 11-year-olds said they owned a mobile phone as did eighty-five percent of 14-year-olds.
The study showed that teenagers from families with a household income of less than $35,000 per year spent three more hours a day on screen media watching TV and online videos than teenagers in families with an annual income of more than $100,000.
The increased screen time could also convert to more problems offline, the findings showed.
“The evidence so far suggests that smartphones may serve as mirrors reflecting problems teens already have. Those from low-income families said that social media experiences more frequently spilt over into real life, causing more offline fights and problems at school,” Odgers said.