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India set to expand trade relations with Iran

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New Delhi: A press report in Iran revealed that New Delhi was interested in inking a preferential trade agreement with Tehran once the global embargo related to trade was lifted.

“We have a good relationship with Iran. It is a good market for us in the long term,” the Economic Times newspaper quoted a “senior” commerce department official as saying.

If the agreement is sealed then it would be the first of its kind in India. Though the trade pact is in a conceptual stage, both India and Islamic Republic of Iran had expressed deep eagerness in the deal. However, no formal negotiations had been initiated.

New Delhi’s eagerness comes at a time when the Obama administration is slated to lift the embargo in January next year. Notably, the report filed by the nuclear watchdog of the United Nation said that there was a dearth of evidence that could prove that Iran was carrying out the process of uranium enrichment for developing nuclear arms. They had successfully justified its activities of the hard-water plants as well.

Earlier, the Manmohan Singh government in India had failed to implement the project of a gas pipeline which also involved Pakistan. It had allegedly irked the Tehran.

However, the Iran and the six-nations talks on the nuclear deals and the IAEA’s reports had cornered Tehran.

India had not explored the West Asian market before due to obvious reasons. Civil wars, militancy and religious fundamentalism in the west Asian counties did hinder business strategies.

However, currently India is spreading its market globally under the stewardship of Narendra Modi. The deal with the country would definitely provide a foothold to explore markets in the region.

Besides exporting chemicals, agricultural goods and automobile spares to Iran, India ranks second in importing crude oil from them.

A deal with them would not only be profitable for India, but it would bolster the economy of the country.

(With inputs from ET)

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Iran looking Forward To Continue Nuclear Enrichment Activity

President Donald Trump withdrew United States from the 2015 nuclear accord

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A bicyclist passes the nuclear power plant just outside Bushehr, Iran, Oct. 26, 2010.
A bicyclist passes the nuclear power plant just outside Bushehr, Iran, Oct. 26, 2010, VOA

Iran has informed the International Atomic Energy Agency it will resume testing of a new generation of nuclear centrifuges Wednesday.

Ali Akbar Salehi, the head of Iran’s nuclear energy agency, said Tehran would remain within the framework of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, nuclear deal reached with the five permanent members of the United Nations plus Germany. Salehi added that the accord allowed Iran to test a new generation of nuclear centrifuges and that his country’s nuclear program is intended for peaceful civilian purposes.

Salehi says Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei issued a religious edict years ago that banned nuclear weapons.

Khamenei told a group of visitors Monday that he had issued orders for the country’s Atomic Energy Organization to increase its enrichment capacity to 190,000 centrifuges, provisionally, in accordance with the JCPOA.

President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the 2015 nuclear accord last month. Britain, France and Germany have been attempting to salvage the deal that Trump has described as “horrible” and “one-sided.”

 

Iran's head of the country's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, attends a seminar in Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 5, 2015. logo LIVE MIDDLE EAST Iran Prepares to Resume Nuclear Enrichment Activity June 06, 2018 1:16 PM Edward Yeranian FILE: A bicyclist passes the nuclear power plant just outside Bushehr, Iran, Oct. 26, 2010. FILE: A bicyclist passes the nuclear power plant just outside Bushehr, Iran, Oct. 26, 2010. Share See comments CAIRO — Iran has informed the International Atomic Energy Agency it will resume testing of a new generation of nuclear centrifuges Wednesday. Ali Akbar Salehi, the head of Iran's nuclear energy agency, said Tehran would remain within the framework of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, nuclear deal reached with the five permanent members of the United Nations plus Germany. Salehi added that the accord allowed Iran to test a new generation of nuclear centrifuges and that his country's nuclear program is intended for peaceful civilian purposes. Salehi says Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei issued a religious edict years ago that banned nuclear weapons. FILE - Iran's head of the country's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, attends a seminar in Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 5, 2015. FILE - Iran's head of the country's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, attends a seminar in Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 5, 2015. Khamenei told a group of visitors Monday that he had issued orders for the country's Atomic Energy Organization to increase its enrichment capacity to 190,000 centrifuges, provisionally, in accordance with the JCPOA. President Donald Trump withdrew the United States from the 2015 nuclear accord last month. Britain, France and Germany have been attempting to salvage the deal that Trump has described as "horrible" and "one-sided." Former Iranian President Abolha
Iran’s head of the country’s Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, attends a seminar in Tokyo, Japan, Nov. 5, 2015. VOA

 

Former Iranian President Abolhassan Bani Sadr told VOA he thinks Khamenei’s decision to resume nuclear enrichment capacity is “not a well-thought out move,” and that it is having negative consequences on regional interests.

According to Bani Sadr, the decision strengthens Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s charge that Iran represents a threat to Israel and must evacuate its forces from Syria, as requested by the U.S.-Israeli-Saudi axis.

In addition, said Bani Sadr, Khamenei’s statement that Israel will be “eradicated from the face of the Earth” negatively influences public opinion against Tehran.

Khattar Abou Diab, a political science professor at the University of Paris, tells VOA that Khamenei’s decision was aimed at pressuring Europe into gaining concessions from the United States. While France’s foreign minister spoke of “red lines” that Iran must not cross, Paris, Berlin and London have asked to be exempted from new economic sanctions Trump imposed on Iran.

Also read: Israel warn Iran hints war Middle East

  • Abou Diab argues that despite Iran’s bluster, it “fears any eventual reaction or backlash from Washington.” (VOA)