Tuesday July 17, 2018

India Stands Second on the Highest Number of Obese Children in 2015

In 2015, India had the second highest number of obese children followed by China

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India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015. Pixabay
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June 14, 2017: India with 14.4 million had the second highest number of obese children in 2015, after China with 15.3 million, a study has found.

The study showed that in 2015, excess weight affected 2.2 billion children and adults worldwide, or 30 percent of all people.

This includes nearly 108 million children and more than 600 million adults with BMI exceeding 30, a metric used to determine obesity.”Excess body weight is one of the most challenging public health problems of our time, affecting nearly one in every three people,” said lead author Ashkan Afshin, Assistant Professor at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) in Washington, US.

The findings, published in The New England Journal of Medicine, represent “a growing and disturbing global public health crisis,” the researchers said.

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Further, an increasing number of people are dying even though they are not technically considered obese.

Of the 4.0 million deaths attributed to excess body weight in 2015, nearly 40 per cent occurred among people whose body mass index (BMI) fell below the threshold considered “obese,” the researchers noted.

“People who shrug off weight gain do so at their own risk — the risk of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, cancer, and other life-threatening conditions,” explained Christopher Murray from the University of Washington.

The study spans 195 countries and territories from 1980 through 2015.

The results showed that the prevalence of obesity has doubled since 1980 in more than 70 countries. (IANS)

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Obesity Alone Does not Increase Death Risk: Study

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease

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The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.
The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors. Pixabay

Patients who have metabolically healthy obesity but are free from other metabolic risk factors do not have an increased rate of mortality, a new study has found.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.

The study, published in the journal Clinical Obesity, showed that unlike dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes — each one of which is related to high mortality risk — obesity alone does not pose any threat to life.

“We are showing that individuals with metabolically healthy obesity are actually not at an elevated mortality rate,” said lead author Jennifer Kuk, Associate Professor at the York University in Canada.

“We found that a person of normal weight with no other metabolic risk factors is just as likely to die as the person with obesity and no other risk factors,” Kuk added.

Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications.
Metabolically healthy obesity is a debatable medical condition characterized by obesity which does not produce metabolic complications. Pixabay

For the study, the research team followed 54,089 men and women from five cohort studies who were categorized as having obesity alone or clustered with a metabolic factor, or elevated glucose, blood pressure or lipids alone or clustered with obesity or another metabolic factor.

The researchers looked at how many people within each group died as compared to those within the normal weight population with no metabolic risk factors.

They found that one out of 20 individuals with obesity had no other metabolic abnormalities.

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“This is in contrast with most of the literature and we think this is because most studies have defined metabolic healthy obesity as having up to one metabolic risk factor,” said Kuk.

“This is clearly problematic, as hypertension alone increases your mortality risk and past literature would have called these patients with obesity and hypertension, ‘healthy’. This is likely why most studies have reported that ‘healthy’ obesity is still related with higher mortality risk,” Kuk noted.

Earlier, a study, published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology journal, found that women with metabolically healthy obesity were at 39 per cent higher risk of cardiovascular disease. (IANS)