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India takes delivery of 2 Refitted Mirage Jet fighters in Southern France

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By NewsGram Staff Writer

Dassault’s Indian partner, under the Rafale contract has delivered India, two refitted Mirage fighter jet out of 51 at a ceremony at the Istres airbase in southern France.

The contract signed in 2011, worth 1.4 billion euros or Rs. 9571 crores is to be shared by Thales and Dassault reported the French business website LaTribune.fr.

Hindustan Aeronautics Limited (HAL), Dassault’s Indian partner, under the Rafale contract will upgrade the rest of the 51 jets, stated the deal.

Dassault CEO Eric Trappier said, “India is Dassault Aviation’s top export customer and the historical ties we have maintained with the Indian air force for 60 years continue to strengthen.”

Referring to negotiations that began in January 2012 for the sale of 126 fighter planes worth $12 billion or Rs. 74 thousand crores, Trappier said that Rafale would be the next logical step. According to the idea, HAL would build 108 fighters under technology transfer agreements while Dassault would supply 18 of the twin-engine multirole fighters later this year.

India was Dassault’s first export client with the transfer of the Ouragon fighter jet in 1953. To spur the country’s manufacturing sector Prime Minister Narendra Modi is advocating the ‘Make in India’ policy.

 

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France Fines Google Due To Its Inability To Provide Transparency

Google said it was studying the ruling to determine its next steps.

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Google
The Google logo is seen at a start-up campus in Paris, France, Feb. 15, 2018. VOA

France’s data watchdog fined Google nearly $57 million on Monday, saying the tech giant failed to provide users with transparent information on its data consumer policies and how their personal information was used to display advertising targeting them.

The French agency CNIL said U.S.-based Google made it too difficult for internet users to understand and manage their personal preferences online.

“The information provided is not sufficiently clear,” the regulatory agency said, “for the user to understand the legal basis for targeted advertising is consent, and not Google’s legitimate business interests.”

Google, Australia, encryption, Sundar pichai
A smartphone and computer screen display the Google home page. Australia is one step closer to forcing tech firms to give police access to encrypted data. VOA

It was the first ruling using the European Union’s strict new General Data Protection Regulation since it was implemented last year, a sweeping set of rules that has set a global standard forcing large American technology firms to examine their practices or risk huge fines.

Also Read: France Hopes To Revive Efforts To Regulate Internet Cyberspace With ‘Paris Call’

Google said it was studying the ruling to determine its next steps.

“People expect high standards of transparency and control from us,” Google said. “We’re deeply committed to meeting those expectations and the consent requirements” of the new regulations. (VOA)