Thursday February 21, 2019
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India tops the list of fatalities caused by selfies

Out of 49 deaths, India accounted almost 40% of the total deaths across the world.

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Ramandeep Singh Source: Youtube

Take a Selfie, don’t take your life. The undying “selfie fever” has resulted in tragic deaths every year across the globe and number of deaths caused by it is rapidly increasing.

Take the latest example of a tragic death due to selfie.

Punjab: A teenage boy himself became the cause of his death. A 15 year-old, Ramandeep Singh accidentally shot himself in head while taking selfie with is father’s .32 caliber pistol according to Police, Deputy Superintendent of Pathankot. He also said that safety catch was not on. This incident took place on 29th April,2016.

Later, the teen was rushed to the nearby hospital where he underwent surgery. After two days, he died due to his injuries.

According to the Statistics:

  • India tops the list of fatalities caused by selfies.
  • Out of 49 deaths, India accounted almost 40% of the total deaths across the world.

Related: Mumbai school boy dies while taking selfie

Also read: is now classified as an Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

  Some recent fatalities that have occurred in India:

  • In January last year, three youngsters were killed by speeding train while posing selfie on railway tracks of Mathura.
  • Seven youth drowned in Mangrul Lake near Kuhi.
  • A Japanese fell down a staircase and died while taking selfie at the Taj Mahal, Agra.
  • In Tamil Nadu, an engineering student died while taking selfie on Kolli Hills when the rock cracked on which he was standing.
  • While taking selfie two engineering students drowned in Narmada Canal, Gujrat.
  • A college student drowned after falling off of the Waldevi Dam, Nashik.

Earlier, Authorities in Mumbai imposed restriction by collecting fine on taking selfie in certain areas – “no selfie zones”. Government in India, has ordered the police to take immediate action if they find someone clicking selfies in risky areas or any area popular among youngsters for carrying selfie sticks.

A woman using selfie stick on steps of Pyramid of the Sun, Teotihuacan. Wikimedia Commons
A woman carrying selfie stick. Wikimedia commons

Other countries like Russia are also taking protective measures by creating awareness. A brochure has been released there with the text written on it “selfie with weapon can kill you”.

(With inputs from IANS and CNN)

Next Story

HPV Vaccination May Bring An End To Cervical Cancer In India by 2070

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

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Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations. Pixabay

Human papillomavirus (HPV) screening and vaccination must be taken up on a war footing in countries like India to prevent 15 million cervical cancer deaths among women by 2050, a Lancet research said.

Causing the second-highest number of deaths among Indian women among cancer variants, cervical cancer, in a majority of cases, is caused by HPV, a group of more than 150 viruses.

The efforts might even result in cervical cancer being eliminated as a public health hazard in India by 2070-79, according to the study, published in The Lancet Oncology journal.

Combining high uptake of the HPV vaccine and cervical screening could eliminate cervical cancer as a public health hazard in 149 out of 181 countries by 2100 and up to 13 million cases of cervical cancer by 2050.

Cancer
“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS. Pixabay

If the high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening cannot be achieved globally, over 44 million women could be diagnosed with cervical cancer in the next 50 years with two-thirds of these cases and an additional estimated 15 million deaths, would occur in countries with low and medium levels of development.

“More than two thirds of cases prevented would be in countries with low and medium levels of human development like India, Nigeria, and Malawi, where there has so far been limited access to HPV vaccination or cervical screening,” said lead author Professor Karen Canfell from the Cancer Council New South Wales in Australia.

However, large disparities exist in cervical screening and HPV vaccination coverage among countries.

“Awareness about cervical cancer is extremely poor among common people; that makes containing the disease a challenge,” Anjila Aneja, Director at Fortis La Femme, New Delhi, told IANS.

“While societal barriers prevent women from seeking medical help in advance, women are forced to come out at a later stage when the disease has reached an advanced stage,” she said.

cancer
Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said. Pixabay

However, Canfell says that despite the enormity of the problem, their findings suggest that “global elimination is within reach with tools that are already available, provided that both high coverage of HPV vaccination and cervical screening can be achieved.

Cervical cancer is the fourth-most common cancer among women, with an estimated 570,000 new cases diagnosed worldwide in 2018, of which around 85 per cent occur in less developed nations.

Screening and broad-spectrum HPV vaccines could potentially prevent up to 84-90 per cent of cervical cancers, the study said.

Also Read: Indian IT Act Silent On Social Media’s Manipulative Role
“Diagnostic tests such as the pap smear are effective in identifying cancerous tendencies.

“However, these tests are available with a limited number of providers and largely within the cities. This makes screening sporadic and leaves out women who live in rural areas,” Aneja added. (IANS)