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Indian American Scientist Viral Patel Invents Ultrasonic Dryer, which doesn’t Involve Evaporation

In the latest invention, humans have been given an ultrasonic dryer that will not need heat to dry clothes

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Ultrasonic Dryer
Indian American Scientist Viral Patel Invents Ultrasonic Dryer. Twitter
  • Viral Patel, an Indian American Scientist, has invented a dryer that uses ultrasonic ways of drying clothes
  • The dryer does not use heat. And it is claimed to be five times more efficient than a regular dryer
  • The inventor is in talks with GE Appliances to bring it in the consumer market 

July 14, 2017: Viral Patel is an Indian American researcher and development associate at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Tennesse. A team of scientists led by him has invented an Ultrasonic Dryer, but unlike a conventional dryer, it would not involve evaporation.

Any conventional dryer, as he explained, is straightforward in its function. It collects air and pushes it in the washing drum, on the way passing through a heater. This heat further absorbs the moisture from clothes.

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However, in Patel’s Ultrasonic Dryer, the machine pulls up water from the wet clothes. It consists of transducers that vibrate (when the voltage is applied) at high frequency sucking the water out of clothes. There is no heat involved. As Viral Patel stated to Knoxville News Sentinel, “Instead of evaporation, its technically performing mechanical extraction of the moisture within the fabric.”

The Ultrasonic Dryer is five times more efficient than any other dryer before it.

– by Saksham Narula of NewsGram. Twitter: @Saksham2394

Next Story

Apple’s Recycling Robot Is Capable of Disassembling 200 iPhones Per Hour

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills. 

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Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year. Pixabay

 Apple on Thursday announced to expand its global recycling programmes and introduced Daisy, its recycling robot that is capable of disassembling 200 iPhones per hour.

US customers can send their iPhones to be disassembled by Daisy which is 33 feet long, has five arms and can methodically deconstruct any of 15 iPhone models.

Daisy will disassemble and recycle select used iPhones returned to Best Buy stores throughout the US and KPN retailers in the Netherlands, the company said in a statement ahead of Earth Day that falls on April 22.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain. Pixabay

Apple also announced the opening of its “Material Recovery Lab” dedicated to discovering future recycling processes in Austin, Texas.

The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges.

“Advanced recycling must become an important part of the electronics supply chain, and Apple is pioneering a new path to help push our industry forward,” said Lisa Jackson, Apple’s vice president of Environment, Policy and Social Initiatives.

Apple has received nearly one million devices through its programmes and each Daisy can disassemble 1.2 million devices per year.

In 2018, the company refurbished more than 7.8 million Apple devices and helped divert more than 48,000 metric tons of electronic waste from landfills.

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The Lab will work with Apple engineering teams as well as academia to address and propose solutions to today’s industry recycling challenges. Pixabay

Daisy can take apart iPhones to recover materials such as cobalt, aluminum and tin, which are then recycled back into the manufacturing process.

Once materials have been recovered by Daisy, they are recycled back into the manufacturing process.

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For cobalt, which is a key battery material, Apple sends iPhone batteries recovered by Daisy upstream in its supply chain.

They are then combined with scrap from select manufacturing sites and, for the first time, cobalt recovered through this process is now being used to make brand-new Apple batteries. (IANS)