Saturday December 15, 2018

Indian American woman arrested for fraud in the name of fake blood cancer

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San Francisco: An Indian American woman was arrested on the charges of fraud for faking to be a blood cancer patient and raising funds through online fundraising sites like Giving Forward in San Francisco, media reports said.

Manisha Nagrani, 40, tried to raise funds by unwittingly linking her fake appeal to the fundraising site Giving Forward. It is not yet known how much money she siphoned off fundraising sites, the American Bazaar reported.

Hubculture.com — a global collaboration platform to expand collective consciousness — which had also pitched in for her by unwittingly linking her fake appeal to the fundraising site Giving Forward, reported that Nagrani has been working as a marketing consultant in San Francisco, and has worked across a number of PR and technology related fronts over the years.

Earlier in 2014, Nagrani on her Facebook page wrote, “Twenty days ago I received the news that no one wants to hear – my body is failing at its fight against the MDS (Myelodysplastic syndromes). I have received an ‘official’ expiration date.”

“If my doctors are right, I won’t be celebrating Thanksgiving again, I won’t see my God-children celebrate their next birthdays, I won’t have the chance to experience some beautiful dreams on my bucket list,” Nagrani wrote.(IANS)

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World’s Smallest Wearable Can Help in Preventing Skin Cancer

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year

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World's smallest device to prevent skin cancer, mood disorder risk. Pixabay

Scientists have developed the world’s smallest wearable, battery-free device that can warn people of overexposure to ultraviolet rays (UV) — a leading factor for developing skin cancer.

Currently, people do not know how much UV light they are actually getting. The rugged and waterproof device interacts wirelessly with the phone and helps maintain an awareness and for skin cancer survivors.

Smaller than an M&M (colourful button-shaped chocolates) and thinner than a credit card, the device can optimise treatment of neonatal jaundice, skin diseases, seasonal affective disorder and reduce risk of sunburns and skin cancer.

Users can glue the device on to their hats, clip it to sunglasses or stick it on their nail and can simultaneously record up to three separate wavelengths of light.

It is always on yet never needs to be recharged.

“There is a critical need for technologies that can accurately measure and promote safe UV exposure at a personalised level in natural environments,” said Steve Xu, from Northwestern University in the US.

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Cancer Ribbon. Pixabay

“We hope people with information about their UV exposure will develop healthier habits when out in the sun,” said Xu.

There are no switches or interfaces to wear out, and it is completely sealed in a thin layer of transparent plastic, the researchers stated, in the paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

Participants who mounted device on themselves recorded multiple forms of light exposure during outdoor activities, even in the water.

Also Read- First NASA Probe to Return Asteroid Sample Reaches Destination

The findings showed that it monitored therapeutic UV light in clinical phototherapy booths for psoriasis and atopic dermatitis (immune diseases) as well as blue light phototherapy for newborns with jaundice in the neonatal intensive care unit.

It also demonstrated the ability to measure white light exposure for seasonal depression, a mood disorder characterised by depression that occurs at the same time every year. (IANS)