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Indian Hospitals are using cameras, tags, lasers to curb Baby trafficking and theft

Indian hospitals are educating their staff to spot baby thieves amid fears that baby trafficking is becoming an organized crime nationwide

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Activists of Socialist Unity Center of India-Marxist (SUCI-M) protest a recent case of child trafficking in West Bengal state in Kolkata, India, Nov. 29, 2016. Officials busted a child trafficking racket and rescued more than 20 children, according to news reports
Activists of Socialist Unity Center of India-Marxist (SUCI-M) protest a recent case of child trafficking in West Bengal state in Kolkata, India, Nov. 29, 2016. Officials busted a child trafficking racket and rescued more than 20 children, according to news reports. VOA

Hospitals in India are starting to tag newborns, mothers, and medics as well as installing extra security cameras and educating staff to spot baby thieves amid fears that baby trafficking is becoming an organized crime nationwide.

Officials said this was part of a drive starting at government hospitals in southern Tamil Nadu state to ensure nurses, doctors and visitors know of the threat of babies being stolen from maternity wards and babies being sold illegally for adoption that is baby trafficking.

At the Rajaji government hospital in Madurai, the first in Tamil Nadu to introduce the program, laser beams at exit points trigger alarms if untagged adults take babies out in order to curb baby trafficking.

“We just want to prevent the theft of babies,” N.K. Mahalakshmi, the doctor in charge of laser tagging at the hospital, told the Thomson Reuters Foundation. “It is not fool proof but a deterrent. … Our hospital staff has also been told to be extra vigilant.”

Traffickers, officials sometimes collude

Campaigners have raised concerns that traffickers are often colluding with officials to steal babies from maternity wards and illegally sell them for adoption which is baby trafficking.

Mumbai police arrested a gang for convincing single mothers to sell their babies last year, while in West Bengal police found newborns being stolen from mothers in medical clinics after staff told them that their babies were stillborn.

Dev Ananth, a child protection officer in Tirunelveli district, said the state government is investigating several cases where hospital staff persuaded mothers to sell their babies for about 10,000 Indian rupees ($156).

Tirunelveli district will put posters up in every hospital, alerting pregnant women, families, and staff to the dangers of baby trafficking in overcrowded corridors.

“Many don’t see it as a trafficking issue,” he said.

“We are going to train hospital staff to identify potential cases, including what to do if a baby is abandoned at birth. At present, the do’s and don’ts are not clear.”

No official data on baby trafficking

There is no official data on the number of babies stolen from hospitals in Tamil Nadu, but almost 180,000 children were born in government facilities in 2016, statistics show.

More than four out of 10 of human trafficking cases in India in 2015 involved children being bought, sold and exploited as modern-day slaves, according to crime figures.

“Public hospitals are vulnerable spaces where there are no effective ways to monitor access to newborn babies,” said Paul Sunder Singh of the children’s charity Karunalaya. (VOA)

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Can Pain Make You Feel Better ? Understanding Deliberate Self Harm Practices Among Adolescents

What do children and young adults do when the level of emotional pressure becomes increasingly high? According to studies, an increasing number of adolescents indulge in self harm to relieve stress.

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self harm
Societal pressure and lack of support often forces young adults to indulge in impulsive self-harm mechanisms like drug overdose and self cutting. Pixabay

– by Dr. Rajeev Nagpal, Australia

  • Deliberate self harm (DSH), also known as self injury is the act of intentionally inflicting damage to the body
  • It has become a common practice among children and teenagers across the globe
  • DSH among teenagers can be attributed to lifestyle and technology changes, peer pressure and lack of support

Australia, September 1, 2017: Dr. Rajeev Nagpal expresses his opinion on the dangerous practice of self-harm increasingly affecting children and young adults across the world.

What is Deliberate Self-Harm (DSH)?

Self-harm is described as an expression of situational crisis or personal distress which leads to harming oneself. NICE clinical guidelines from the UK have defined it as self-poisoning or injury, irrespective of the apparent purpose of the act.

Deliberate Self Harm (DSH) is not a clinical condition but a response to a stressful situation in the life of a young child or adolescent. It can occur after long term stress like abuse or domestic violence or after an acute single event like the loss of a near one or failure in examinations. It is primarily a coping mechanism in which they try to release tension by trying to self-harm.

Self harm
Dr. Nagpal views self-harm not as a clinical condition, but as a coping mechanism adopted by children and young adults to vent their tension.

Already there are reports of Indian children losing their life after playing games like the blue whale challenge on the internet. It is time for the general population, including the parents of young children to understand the issues of this very complex condition called deliberate self-harm.

Public Health Issue

In recent years DSH has become a major public health issue in most developed countries. However, although less reported, this problem is a major under-recognized epidemic in low and middle –income countries like India, Nepal.

According to a retrospective study conducted at the Emergency department of CMC, Vellore, India from Jan 2011 to Dec 2013, among the total 1228 patients who were admitted, consumption of pesticides was the most common cause of DSH in men. Consumption of plant poisoning and drug overdose was more common in women.The study involved all population, therefore, the actual number of pediatric population was difficult to ascertain.

Other international studies have also revealed that adolescents, who experienced anxiety or low mood, were six times more at risk of self-harm in young adulthood compared to those without depression or anxiety disorders.

Approximately a million lives are lost to suicide annually, worldwide.

Deliberate self-harm (DSH) is the single most important risk factor for suicide and is associated with huge health service resource utilization. Deliberate self-poisoning in children continues to remain a significant part of the workload of emergency departments, especially in adolescents, even though fewer children need admission now as compared with earlier decades.

Presentation of DSH

Many young adults find it difficult to express their feelings. Some examples of self-harm behavior are:

  • Self-cutting or scratching
  • Burning or scalding
  • Poisoning with drugs like paracetamol, anti-depressants
  • Swallowing objects

Relatively little information is available about the characteristics and long-term outcome of children and adolescents aged under 15 years who present to general hospitals because of deliberate self-harm (DSH).

Depressive disorders in pediatrics fall in ranges from mood changes in response to persistent mood change accompanied by suicidal ideation or intent.

The difficulties faced by adolescents are getting more complex with lifestyle and technology changes globally. Peer pressure along with family expectations can aggravate this sense of worthlessness.

Deliberate self harm
Feelings of helplessness, stemming from a variety of social and cultural factors can force an adolescent to indulge in self-harm. Pixabay

Lack of support networks can lead them to opt for impulsive self-harm mechanisms like poisoning. Intentional overdose to commonly implicated drugs like Paracetamol in the UK, or organo- phosphorous compounds in Nepal and is a cause of grave concern.

How to Deal with this Issue

As young children are unable to deal very well with emotional stresses, they will need a supportive team to help them in understanding their feelings and the possible outcomes from them.

This requires a multidisciplinary team approach.

  • Understanding the issues by holding awareness sessions of this condition in schools and other organizations
  • Creating referral pathways that all school staff are aware of
  • Confidential telephone lines /NGOs dealing with mental health of adolescent’s
  • Government policies and procedures for treatment of acute cases in Accident and Emergency departments
  • Provision of developing CAMHS(Child and adolescent mental health services ) like services at state level in Indian government hospitals.
  • Increased research particularly in pediatrics and adolescent’s needs to be conducted at state and national level.

ALSO READ Suicide is Preventable: Alarming Effects of Self-harm on Families, Communities, Societies

Conclusion

DSH is an under-recognized, major public health problem in low and middle-income countries. National level medical protocols and increasing the awareness amongst the public and agencies dealing with such conditions can be the first step in saving millions of lives from the untimely death of the most vulnerable yet productive younger sections of the society.

Dr. Rajeev Nagpal  is a Pediatrician and MHID (Masters OF Health and International Development-Flinders University, Adelaide, Australia) 

 


 

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India’s first Online Course on Infusion Therapy for Nurses launched, Aims to Train over 3,000 nurses in the Vital Medical Procedure

The course will enable members to access the various infusion therapy modules and presentations through its website

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India's first online course on Infusion Therapy for nurses launched
India's first online course on Infusion Therapy for nurses launched. Pixabay
  • It aims to train over 3,000 nurses
  • Infusion therapy means the administration of a drug intravenously
  • Improper infusion practices may lead to complications

New Delhi, August 16, 2017: Infusion Nurses Society (INS), a global authority in infusion therapy, on Sunday launched India’s first online course on Infusion Therapy for nurses, under which it aims to train over 3,000 nurses in the vital medical procedure.

Announcing the initiative, which will boost nurses even in rural parts of India, INS said that utilizing the reach and ease of the digital platform, the course will enable members to access the various infusion therapy modules and presentations through its website.

ALSO READ: India: Highest source for nurses in Britain

 Infusion therapy means the administration of a drug intravenously, but the term also may refer to situations where drugs are provided through other non-oral routes, such as intramuscular injections and epidural routes.

Nine of ten patients admitted in hospitals receive infusion therapy during the course of their stay for therapeutic or diagnostic purposes. Improper infusion practices may lead to complications, causing an increase in mortality, morbidity, duration of hospital stay and health care costs.

“The thinking behind such initiatives is to engage healthcare professionals to intensify the best safety and quality practices in infusion management across the country,” said President of INS India Binu Sharma during the launch. (IANS)

 

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Over 50 Percent Doctors found to have uncontrolled hypertension or high blood pressure (BP) despite taking Hypertensive Medicines: Study

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Suicide for cancer cells via a combination drug
A combination drug of diabeties and hypertension to cure cancer,pixabay

New Delhi, May 16, 2017: More than 50 per cent physicians have been found to have uncontrolled hypertension or high blood pressure (BP) despite taking hypertensive medicines, owing to high-stress levels, a study has showed.

Hypertension is one of the most common lifestyle diseases prevalent today with one in three Indian adults suffering from it and is equally high amongst the medical fraternity.

However, it is often misdiagnosed given the difference in blood pressure readings at home and in a clinical setting.

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The findings found that 56 percent of doctors suffered from irregular BP at night and 21 percent from masked hypertension — a condition in which a patient’s blood pressure reading is inaccurate due to specific environments.

This masked hypertension is also associated with an increased long-term risk of sustained hypertension and cardiovascular morbidity, the study said.

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“Over 50 per cent physicians had uncontrolled hypertension despite taking hypertensive medicines. While 21 per cent of the doctors surveyed had masked hypertension or isolated ambulatory hypertension, another 56 per cent doctors suffered from irregular BP pattern at night making them prone to future adverse cardiac events,” said Indian Medical Association (IMA) Presidet K.K. Aggarwal.

For the study, the team took nearly 20,000 readings of 533 doctors.

The study aimed to raise awareness about the benefits of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) — where the BP of the patient is continuously evaluated over a period of 24 hours — in the timely and correct diagnosis of hypertension. (IANS)

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