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Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC) to have Journalism Courses in Regional Languages

The seminar was about emphasizing the significance of journalism courses in regional languages

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IIMC, Twitter

November 24, 2016: Recently, Department of Mass Communication, Mizoram University, organized a two-day national seminar on “Media, Technology and Power of Politics: The Indian Conventicle.”

The seminar was inaugurated by K.G. Suresh, Director General of Indian Institute of Mass Communication (IIMC). The seminar was attended by academicians from the University as well as some other states, mentioned PTI.

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Emphasizing the significance of journalism courses in regional languages, Suresh said, “It is utmost important to bring back objectivity to the media in the country”. He added that the IIMC will have journalism courses in regional languages.

He believes that media should not be regulated by the state. Instead, it should be self-regulated.

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According to PTI, he said that social media has made a significant shift in journalism where social networking sites have become fodder for the news. Panel discussion on television has replaced the old field reporting which is a great loss to the nation.

Prepared by Diksha Arya of NewsGram. Twitter: @diksha_arya53

Next Story

People Feel Exposed to Fake News on Social Media, Says Study

The researchers said that when disinformation campaigns challenge access to reliable information, citizens are left to make “uninformed choices”

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Multiple apps are displayed on an iPhone in New York. VOA

A new study has revealed that the more people feel they are exposed to fake news on social media on a regular basis, the more they are likely to distrust the media in general.

The study’s findings, published in the African Journalism Studies journal, revealed that places such as sub-Saharan Africa, where disinformation campaigns have been used recently to influence electoral campaigns, perceive that exposure to disinformation is high and trust in national media and social media is low.

For the study, the researchers included nearly 1,900 people in Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa who are highly educated, live in urban, middle class areas and have access to social media.

As many as 90 per cent of Kenyans, 93 per cent of Nigerians and 76 per cent of South Africans believe that they are exposed to false news about politics on a fairly regular basis, the study found.

In a 2016 Pew Research Center study which sampled just over 1,000 Americans, 71 per cent of respondents said they often or sometimes saw fake political news.

Conference, Privacy, Social Media
FILE – Silhouettes of mobile users are seen next to logos of social media apps Signal, Whatsapp and Telegram projected on a screen in this picture illustration. VOA

“We found that people in sub-Saharan Africa particularly distrust information on social media, such as Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp because that’s where they find ‘fake news’ most often,” said Dani Madrid-Morales, Assistant Professor at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

“Governments are already using this as an excuse to put restrictions on media by saying that too much freedom of speech on these American platforms poses a ‘danger’ to national security,” he added.

When it comes to sharing a political story that study participants knew at the time was made up, 29 per cent of Kenyans, 18 per cent of Nigerians and 25 per cent of South Africans answered “yes.”

Also Read: Digital Games on Smartphones Better Stress Reliever Than Fidget-spinner

These numbers are higher than the US where 14 per cent of participants answered “yes” in the Pew study.

The researchers said that when disinformation campaigns challenge access to reliable information, citizens are left to make “uninformed choices”. (IANS)