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Indian Nuclear Doctrine Worries Pakistan

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Representational Image of Nuclear Explosion, Source : Pixabay

Islamabad, April 4, 2017: Pakistan is worried about the signs that India is rethinking its policy of ‘no first use’ (NFU) of nuclear weapons.

Former chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee General Ehsan ul Haq (Retd), who has remained closely associated with Pakistan’s nuclear thinking, said on Friday that Islamabad has always been skeptical about Indian ‘no first use’ claims.

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According to Dawn online, Haq said the recent disclosure by a scholar has cleared Pakistan’s doubts that India’s NFU policy is a sham.

While speaking at the launch of ‘Learning to Live with the Bomb, Pakistan: 1998-2016’ book by Naeem Salik, a former official of the Strategic Plans Division, Haq said he was happy that Indians were themselves exposing their claims.

He claimed it was happening against the backdrop of the extremist Hindutva agenda of the Bharatiya Janata Party government.

According to Dawn, Vipin Narang from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology said India was moving away from its policy of ‘no first use’ and might carry out a pre-emptive nuclear strike against Pakistan if it believed Islamabad was going to use nuclear weapons against it.

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Haq said the rethink in India was the latest in a series of provocative actions.

According to the retired General, Indian steps from the admission of interference in erstwhile East Pakistan to references to Balochistan and Gilgit-Baltistan, scuttling the Saarc summit, escalation along the Line of Control, claims of surgical strikes, diplomatic maneuvering to isolate Pakistan and domestic war hysteria had heightened tensions between the two countries.

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India had been “challenging the credibility of Pakistan’s nuclear deterrence through doctrinal as well as technological developments”, he said.

Salik, who has in his book discussed Pakistan’s learning curve as a nuclear power, said Indian moves like the recent talk about the transformation from a “passive NFU to pre-emptive disarming strikes” had kept Pakistani strategists on their toes. IANS

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Javad Zarif Says, Iran not Seeking Nuclear Weapons as Tensions Escalate with US

Zarif said in a tweet that "we're not seeking nuclear weapons," adding that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had issued a fatwa "banning them"

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Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (file photo) RFERL

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif has said Tehran is not seeking nuclear weapons as tensions escalate with the United States. Zarif’s remarks on May 27 came the same day that U.S. President Donald Trump said Washington was not seeking regime change in Iran but wanted to ensure Tehran did not produce nuclear arms.

Zarif said in a tweet that “we’re not seeking nuclear weapons,” adding that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had issued a fatwa “banning them.” He said that U.S. “economic terrorism” was “hurting the Iranian people and causing tension in the region.”

Trump said the United States was “not looking regime change, we’re looking for no nuclear weapons,” following talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in Tokyo, adding that he thought “we’ll make a deal” with Tehran over its nuclear program.

nuclear weapons
Zarif said in a tweet that “we’re not seeking nuclear weapons,” adding that Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei had issued a fatwa “banning them.”. Pixabay

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Relations between Tehran and Washington have plummeted since the United States a year ago pulled out of a 2015 nuclear accord between world powers and Iran that curbed the country’s nuclear program in exchange for relief from crippling economic sanctions.

Since then, Washington has reimposed sanctions, stepped up its rhetoric, and beefed up its military presence in the Middle East, prompting growing concerns of a possible military conflict with Iran. (RFERL)