Sunday May 27, 2018
Home India Indian orbite...

Indian orbiter MOM still on lookout for methane on Mars

0
//
123
Republish
Reprint

Mysuru (Karnataka): The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM), India’s first interplanetary mission is still groping around the red planet to locate methane gas in its atmosphere, a senior space scientist said on Monday.

“The Mars Orbiter Mission (MOM) is yet to detect methane gas or find the exact source of it. I don’t have an update on how much of science we have been able to find out,” Indian space agency’s former director S.K. Shivakumar told IANS at the 103rd Indian Science Congress here.

Though India was the first country whose maiden space probe was the first to showcase stunning pictures of the red planet in its very first attempt on September 24, 2014, the 475kg orbiter with five scientific instruments on board is yet to relay substantial data or information on Mars’ origin and evolution in the solar system.

“Being a technology person, I don’t know what is its (MOM) current status,” he said on the sidelines of a plenary session on ‘Space Science, Technology, and Applications’, on the second day of the five-day annual event at Manasagangotri campus of University of Mysore.

The Rs.450-crore mission was launched on November 5, 2013, from spaceport Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, about 80km northeast of Chennai, and reached the Martian orbit after a 10-month voyage through the inter-planetary space.

“As of Sunday evening and Monday morning, the orbiter is doing well, going around Mars, taking a different set of pictures and whatever is required with its other payloads,” Shivakumar said.

The spacecraft was successful in surviving a solar eclipse and a 15-day blackout in June last year. It was under solar conjunction from June 8 after it went behind the sun and away from the earth due to a solar eclipse, which occurs once in 26 months over the red planet. The spacecraft is still elliptically orbiting around Mars even 28 months after it entered the Martian orbit.

“As the orbiter still has 37kg of fuel, it will continue to orbit around Mars as long as it can. Though built for six months, it is still alive and going on and on,” Shivakumar added.

Though the orbiter’s communication system was disrupted by the sun’s corona (outer atmosphere) during the fortnight-long eclipse, it got activated and its scientific instruments resumed their activities after being on autonomous mode.

Orbiter takes 3.2 earth days or 72 hours, 51 minutes and 51 seconds to go around Mars once while orbiting at a distance of 500 km nearest and over 80,000 km at the farthest from its surface. (IANS)

Click here for reuse options!
Copyright 2016 NewsGram

Next Story

NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars

It lets Curiosity drill using the force of its robotic arm, a little more like the way a human would drill into a wall at home

0
//
12
NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars
NASA Curiosity Rover Gets its Drilling Groove Back on Mars. Pixabay

After a mechanical problem took NASA Mars rover Curiosity’s drill offline in December 2016, it has now successfully tested a new drilling method on the Red Planet, making a 50-millimetre deep hole in a target called “Duluth”, NASA has said.

Engineers working with the Curiosity Mars rover have been hard at work testing a new way for the rover to drill rocks and extract powder from them.

On May 20, that effort produced the first drilled sample on Mars in more than a year, NASA said in a statement on Wednesday.

The new technique, called Feed Extended Drilling, keeps the drill’s bit extended out past two stabiliser posts that were originally used to steady the drill against Martian rocks.

It lets Curiosity drill using the force of its robotic arm, a little more like the way a human would drill into a wall at home.

“The team used tremendous ingenuity to devise a new drilling technique and implement it on another planet,” said Curiosity Deputy Project Manager Steve Lee of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

“Those are two vital inches of innovation from 60 million miles away. We’re thrilled that the result was so successful,” Lee said.

Drilling is a vitally important part of Curiosity’s capabilities to study Mars.

Inside the rover are two laboratories that are able to conduct chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock and soil samples.

The samples are acquired from Gale Crater, which the rover has been exploring since 2012.

“We’ve been developing this new drilling technique for over a year, but our job isn’t done once a sample has been collected on Mars,” said JPL’s Tom Green, a systems engineer who helped develop and test Curiosity’s new drilling method.

Also Read: NASA Probe to ‘Touch’ the Sun Will Carry 1.1 mn Names

“With each new test, we closely examine the data to look for improvements we can make and then head back to our test bed to iterate on the process.”

There’s also the next step to work on — delivering the rock sample from the drill bit to the two laboratories inside the rover.

As soon as this Friday, the Curiosity team will test a new process for delivering samples into the rover’s laboratories, NASA said. (IANS)

Next Story