Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Albert Einstein, VOA

Chicago, May 8, 2017: If clothes do indeed make the actor, then costume designer Sonu Mishra has just finished making the Oscar-winning Geoffrey Rush as Albert Einstein.

As the costume designer on “Genius”, the National Geographic’s high-profile series about the physicist, Mishra has enjoyed an opportunity to exercise her creative sartorial vision even while keeping it “authentic to the period”.


NewsGram brings to you latest new stories in India.

The series’ Oscar-winning director Ron Howard’s most important brief to Mishra while designing the costumes was to ensure authenticity. In order to achieve that, Mishra, a Mumbai and New York-trained designer, closely studied the evolution of dressing styles, fabric and cultural changes over close to seven decades between 1886 and 1955 during which Einstein lived.

Mishra said she did not go about just designing the costumes but in a sense recreated the whole era with clothes as the reference point. “I had to keep in mind the socio-cultural backgrounds of the various characters which would reflect in the way they dressed up in terms of their hats and other accessories. We chose the dressing style on the basis of who those individuals were in real life,” Mishra told IANS in a phone interview from Rome.

“It was like a painting with so many pieces. Einstein was the main focus, but I had to consider an entire cast of characters that included great scientists such as Max Planck, Niels Bohr and Marie Curie. These were all powerful and amazing personalities whom we had to also represent through their clothes,” Mishra said.

Along with the make-up, costumes constitute the frontline of any movie or television production. In historically demanding roles such as Einstein’s, actors are known to pay particular attention to the clothes because they can make or break their movements and gait and, eventually, performance. Mishra said it was a joy and privilege fitting Rush and other members of the cast because “Genius” is a period piece about the world’s most famous scientist’s personal life.

Go to NewsGram and check out news related to political current issues.

While doing background research before designing the clothes, Mishra said she discovered that students in the Europe of the late 19th and early 20th centuries were known to dress up formally and in a classical style. That was equally true of Einstein, unlike the more popular view of him as a stylishly dishevelled, absent-minded scientist.

“He acquired that relaxed look only after coming to America where dressing was far more informal than in Europe. It was only in America that Einstein’s way of dressing underwent a dramatic change toward the look we all seem so familiar with,” Mishra said. Even within Europe, she had to pay attention to the differences in the way the young Einstein and others dressed up during his days as a student at Zurich’s Polytechnic Institute and a working scientist in Prague later.

Quite apart from choosing the right fabrics, Mishra had to bear in mind finer details such as collars, hats, ties, belts and cravats. In addition, fabrics had to be linen, cotton, gabardine and corduroy . “Anything that was not natural had to be avoided because of the early period,” she said. Mishra said she found the changes in the evolution of women’s costumes for the same period as men “quite rapid”. Details such as hip pads and bicycle skirts had to be taken into consideration.

Look for latest news from India in NewsGram.

While Mishra found fitting costumes for the entire cast exciting and joyful, it was particularly so for Rush as Einstein. “We had to make sure that he and all other actors felt comfortable, especially for him because the series rides on Geoffrey,” she said.

Mishra graduated in fashion design at Sophia College, Mumbai. She moved to New York as 19-year-old in 1989 to work in the wardrobe department at the Roundabout Theatre Company on Broadway and at Odds Costume Rentals. After that stint she moved to Rome where she has emerged as a successful costume designer for major television and movie productions, both Italian and international.

Mishra does not necessarily keep her Indian background as a reference point while working on international projects because their requirements tend to be rather different. However, she said, she is subconsciously influenced by the rich fabrics and colours of India.

Asked about the difference between designing for the movies and television projects, she said, “Television tends to be very focused and costumes are often concentrated on the upper part of the body because of the close-up nature of the medium. The movies, on the other, hand are broader. Of course, both depend a great deal on the kind of scripts,” she said.

Mishra has no plans to work on any Indian productions so far mainly because her hands are full with opportunities in European and American productions. “Genius” in general and working with Ron Howard in particular could open major doors for her in America, although she sees herself mainly based in Rome. She has, of course, worked on major US productions such as Martin Scorsese’s “Gangs of New York” and Renny Harlin’s “The Legend of Hercules”, apart from the TV mini-series “Prison Break: Sequel”.

Apart from television and movies, Mishra has designed for a host of international commercials that include an airline, a beverage company and a brand of post-pay card. (IANS)


Popular

Wikimedia

Amaal represents the new generation of Indian music.

Music composer Amaal Mallik's recent composition for the song 'Tum Aaogey' from the film 'Bell Bottom' has garnered rave reviews. "Tum Aaogey is one of my most special songs and one of my best works that I have done for film music," said Amaal during a candid conversation with IANS.

Amaal represents the new generation of Indian music. In a short span of seven years, he has delivered hits like 'Sooraj Dooba Hain' (Roy), 'Soch Na Sake' (Airlift), 'Kar Gayi Chul' (Kapoor & Sons) among several others. He happens to be one of the youngest composers to compose music for Amitabh Bachchan for the film 'Badla' and also the youngest to have performed with the Melbourne Orchestra.

Internationally, Amaal recently collaborated with pop sensation Dua Lipa for the Indian version of 'Levitating'. "It was an amazing experience for me to collaborate with Dua Lipa. She loved my work. It was the first of its kind collaboration between Indian and international music artistes and fans around the world were delighted with the new rendition of the song. It was an honour for me to do an official Indian remix and giving an Indian touch to one of her biggest tracks, one of the standout songs on the 'Future Nostalgia' album."

Man with balck shirt and pant sitting Internationally, Amaal recently collaborated with pop sensation Dua Lipa for the Indian version of 'Levitating' | IANS

Keep Reading Show less
Wikimedia

After spending three days on-orbit, the world's first civilian mission of SpaceX's Inspiration4 returned to Earth on Sunday

After spending three days on-orbit, the world's first civilian mission of SpaceX's Inspiration4 returned to Earth on Sunday. The crew, onboard the Dragon spacecraft re-entered Earth's atmosphere for a soft water landing off the coast of Florida at 7.06 p.m. EDT (4.36 a.m. Sunday India time). "Happy. Healthy. Home. Welcome back to Earth," Inspiration4 shared in a tweet. "Splashdown! Welcome back to planet Earth," added SpaceX on the microblogging site.

The mission lifted off to orbit aboard SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft on Wednesday (India time Thursday). It was commanded by tech entrepreneur Jared Isaacman and joined by Medical Officer Haley Arceneaux, a physician assistant at St Jude Children's Research Hospital and pediatric cancer survivor; Mission Specialist Chris Sembroski, an Air Force veteran and aerospace data engineer; and Mission Pilot Dr Sian Proctor, a geoscientist, entrepreneur, and trained pilot.

inspiration4 launch The mission lifted off to orbit aboard SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket and Dragon spacecraft on Wednesday (India time Thursday) | Wikimedia

Keep Reading Show less
Photo by Erik Mclean on Unsplash

Fortnite users look forward to new features

By Steve Carty

As we all know, Fortnite has been a very popular battle royale game for a very long time and this is only because of its building aspect. People only try or play this game because of the building aspect. No game has ever had this feature where you could build fight your opponent for high ground and all. It's crazy how they even thought of this. Fortnite has been around for many years now. There used to be a different map in Chapter 1. People were really mad when Fortnite changed the map. People had a sentimental feeling towards that map and thousands of players stopped playing the game and switched to Apex Legends.

Fortnite has a huge map with different pinned locations in it. It's a game that you can't master in a week or two. It can take months or even years depending on how much you practice. People spend hours in creative just to learn a new technique with the building. Some people have been playing since the launch of Fortnite and are still bad at the game. Yes! It's possible to be bad even after you practice a lot. I'd suggest you spend a lot of time in creative and just free build there to get good at it. Once you've mastered the art of building, you'll be good to go and can outbuild anyone for high ground. There is another thing called editing in this game. People use the latest working Fortnite hacks for this where it edits in 0.1 seconds. People won't even see you editing this and this will make you a step ahead of them and due to that, you can easily kill them before they even notice.

Keep reading... Show less