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Indian veteran Journalist T.V. Parasuram passed away in US

Parasuram, who won a Harvard Niemen Fellow in journalism, was known to take shorthand notes at 170 words per minute and would type almost as fast in the typewriter era

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T.V. Parasuram
Journalist T.V. Parasuram Died (representational image Source: Pixabay)
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Washington, Feb 14, 2017: Veteran journalist T.V. Parasuram, who served for long as the Washington correspondent of the Indian Express, died on Monday night in Maryland, his family said. He was 93.

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Parasuram passed away in his sleep in Bethesda, the family said. He is survived by his wife Anantha Lakshmi, son Ashok Parasuram and daughter Anita.

Parasuram, who won a Harvard Niemen Fellow in journalism, was known to take shorthand notes at 170 words per minute and would type almost as fast in the typewriter era.

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He served briefly as the PTI correspondent at the UN in New York after which he joined the Indian Express as its Washington correspondent for two decades till his retirement at age 58.

He then became the PTI’s Washington correspondent till he quit journalism at age 82.

Parasuram wrote two books, “A Medal for Kashmir”, a first-hand account of the Indian Army’s operations in 1947-48 in Jammu and Kashmir. His other book was “India’s Jewish Heritage”.

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Parasuram came from a family of journalists including T.V. Venkitachalam, who worked in PTI and the National Herald, and T.V. Satyanarayanan, who worked in UNI. Another brother is a scientist. (IANS)

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Thanks To Artificial Intelligence, Radio Journalist Regains His Voice

The AI system slices each word read out by an individual into 100 tiny pieces

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Thanks To Artificial Intelligence, Radio Journalist Regains His Voice
Thanks To Artificial Intelligence, Radio Journalist Regains His Voice, Pixabay

A US radio journalist who had lost his voice two years ago due to a rare neurological condition has regained the ability to speak, thanks to artificial intelligence (AI), the media reported.

Jamie Dupree, 54, a political radio journalist with Cox Media Group, got a new voice that trained a neural network to predict how he would talk, using samples from his old voice recordings, the BBC reported.

With his new voice, Dupree can now write a script and then use a free text-to-speech software programme called Balabolka on his laptop to turn it into an audio recording.

If a word or turn of phrase does not sound quite right in the recording, he can slow certain consonants or vowels down, or swap a word to one that does work, or change the pitch, and he can have a full radio story ready to go live in just seven minutes.

“This has saved my job and saved my family from a terrible financial unknown,” Dupree was quoted as saying to the BBC.

In 2016, Dupree was diagnosed with tongue protrusion dystonia — a rare neurological condition where the tongue pushes forward out of his mouth and his throat tightens whenever he wants to speak, making it impossible for him to say more than two or three words at a time.

artificial intelligence, brain
artificial intelligence, brain, Pixabay

Thanks to the new computer-generated voice, created for him by Scottish technology company CereProc, Dupree is set to come back on air, the report said.

The AI system slices each word read out by an individual into 100 tiny pieces, and does this with lots of common words until eventually it understands how basic phonetics work in that person’s voice and has an ordered sequence for all the pieces in each word.

Then, the neural network can create its own sounds and predict what the person would sound like if they were to say a series of words in conversation.

Also read: This Way China Can Help India In The Terms of Artificial Intelligence

“AI techniques work quite well on small constrained problems, and learning to model speech is something deep neural nets can do really well,” Chris Pidcock, CereProc’s chief technical officer and co-founder, told the BBC. (IANS)