Never miss a story

Get subscribed to our newsletter


×
Nearly half think the pandemic is likely to end in India within the next three months. Pixabay

Indians are more likely to believe the COVID crisis will get resolved soon in India than it will globally. Nearly half (48%) think the pandemic is likely to lose steam in India within the next three months (end of May- end of July), which is higher than the number of people hoping for the same to happen globally within this time frame (40%), says a survey.

Fewer Indians (32%) think it may take longer (end of August- end of October) till the crisis resolves in India, but the number of people saying this for the situation changing globally is slightly higher- at 36%.


Fewer than this, both locally (7%) and globally (10%) think the pandemic may last till the end of the year (end of November- end of December) till it is under control.

All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS) Director Randeep Guleria on previous Thursday said that India may witness the peak of COVID-19 cases in June or July, adding, that earlier it was analysed that the peak will be in May but due to extended lockdown the peak has also been extended.


32% Indians think it may take longer like end of August or end of October till the crisis resolves in India. Pixabay

When asked about returning back to normal life, people seem more likely to return to public places such as parks and gardens, college and universities, malls and cinema halls (27% each), and restaurants and hotels (25%) once the number of COVID positive cases in the country are under control (27% each). Three in ten (31%) would consider visiting their friends and family at their homes under similar circumstances.

23% are willing to take a domestic holiday or a staycation when there is no further spike in cases, but when it comes to travelling internationally, Indians are more likely to do so either when the spread of new cases in controlled globally with 21% saying this or when a vaccine to prevent COVID-19 is widely available (20%).

On the other hand, 29 percent Indians say they are more likely to return back to their offices or workplace once the government removes restrictions on movement. A fifth are willing to do so when businesses open again.


31% Indians would consider visiting their friends and family at their homes under similar circumstances. Wikimedia Commons

Read More: How The COVID Pandemic Pushed More Indians To Online Casinos

While the Coronavirus is one of the greatest health crises faced by mankind, it has changed the world in some areas. According to 68 per cent, the biggest positive impact is believed to be on the environment. Recently, thousands of flamingos flocked to the Mumbai Metropolitan Region (MMR), with The Bombay Natural History Society (BNHS) estimating that numbers are 25% higher than the previous year.

The virus has also taught us to value what we have and 50% of the respondents think it has helped us appreciate our loved ones and the society.

On overall positivity and outlook, many believe it may lead to technological advancements (43%), stronger domestic supply chain (35%) and less polarisation within the society (27%). A handful of people (6%), however, believe there will be nothing good coming out of this crisis. (IANS)


Popular

Photo by Izzy Park on Unsplash

Children exposed to high levels of air pollution are up to 50 per cent more likely to self-harm later in life, suggested a study

Children exposed to high levels of air pollution are up to 50 per cent more likely to self-harm later in life, suggested a study that adds to evidence of link between air pollution and mental health problems. Researchers from the University of Manchester in England and Aarhus University examined 1.4million kids under 10 in Denmark and found that those exposed to a high level of nitrogen dioxide were more likely to self harm in adulthood than their peers, the Daily Mail reported.

And people in the same age group exposed to above average levels of fine particulate matter (PM2.5) were 48 per cent more likely to subsequently self-harm, revealed the study published in the journal Preventive Medicine. Nitrogen dioxide is mainly produced by cars, while PM2.5 is mainly emitted by burning diesel and petrol, which is most commonly used for shipping and heating. These two pollutants are among those most commonly linked with causing harm to physical health, such as heart and lung diseases, by getting into the bloodstream and causing inflammation.

"Our findings add to the growing evidence-base indicating that higher levels of air pollution exposure are linked with poor mental health outcomes," lead author Dr Pearl Mok, a research fellow at Manchester University was quoted as saying. "Although air pollution is widespread, it is a modifiable risk factor and we therefore hope our study findings will inform policymakers who are devising strategies to combat this problem," Mok added.

grayscale photo of a girl in garden "Our findings add to the growing evidence-base indicating that higher levels of air pollution exposure are linked with poor mental health outcomes," lead author Dr Pearl Mok | Photo by Caroline Hernandez on Unsplash

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

A South Asia Economy Index

By- Tejas Maheta

When attempting to summarise the current performance and future portents for the South Asia economy, it's arguable that most of the region's nations are doing relatively well.

Keep Reading Show less
wikimedia commons

Bitcoin is gaining prominence in the virtual and business world

By- Jean Nichols

Bitcoin is the first cryptocurrency, and many people have been inspired by bitcoin, and they started to create their cryptocurrency. Even many people are creating their cryptocurrency. Daily there is a new cryptocurrency that is created daily. In this further, we will discuss the factors required to make our cryptocurrencies are.

Keep reading... Show less