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Infant Cereals sold in Lower-Income Countries lack consistency in their Nutritional content: Global Analysis

The findings suggest that there is a need for basic quality assurance services to improve nutritional consistency and healthy growth of infants from 6 to 24 months age

Cereal for a baby , wikimedia

New York, Jan 1, 2017 – Premixed complementary foods sold in lower-income countries lack consistency in their nutritional content, a global analysis of infant cereals has revealed.

The findings suggest that there is a need for basic quality assurance services to improve nutritional consistency and healthy growth of infants from 6 to 24 months age.

Premixed infant cereals or complementary foods can be a vital source of the solid food needed for healthy child growth after the age of six months, when infants outgrow the nutrients provided by breast milk alone.

This conclusion was reached after researchers from Tufts University in the US analysed 108 commercially available premixed complementary foods from 22 low-and-middle-income countries.

The findings, published in the journal Maternal and Child Nutrition, said premixed complementary foods can be extremely effective at protecting infants against malnutrition and stunted growth.

“In countries where we sampled, some products can readily meet children’s needs, but others fall far below requirements for both macro and micro-nutrients,” said William Masters from Tufts University.

“Our results are a call to action for establishing and enforcing nutritional quality standards, which would help ensure access to lower-cost, higher-quality products and enable parents to meet their infants’ needs more easily,” he added.

Researchers said that childhood malnutrition was the main cause of stunted growth, that may lead to delayed mental development and poor school performance — a serious and irreversible condition that affects individuals with greater risk for illness and death throughout their lives.

According to Unicef, nearly half of all deaths in children under age five are related to undernutrition, which is particularly widespread in Africa and Asia.

“A healthy child consuming breast milk alongside the average sampled complementary food would experience zinc and iron deficiency from six to nine months, and dietary fat deficiency at 12 months,” the study said.

The study noted that nutritional content claims on packaging labels did not meet their reported caloric content.

“Slightly more than half of the products misreported protein, and two thirds misreported fat content. For zinc and iron, products exceeded labelled values about as often as they fell short,” the study further added. (IANS)

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Research Reveals That Breastfeeding Can Protect Your Child From Asthma Exacerbation

Research has revealed that children who are breastfed have a 45% lower risk of asthma exacerbation later in life

Breastfeeding can protect your child from Asthma.
Breastfeeding can protect your child from Asthma. Pixabay
  • Breastfeeding creates a protective shield for your child against various diseases
  • A child suffering from Asthma who was breastfed is less prone to Asthma aggravation
  • Breastfeeding strengthens child’s immunity system by providing all necessary nutrients, minerals, antibodies to the child

Washington D.C., September 4, 2017: When a baby is born, the initial few months are very crucial for the baby’s immunity system. Research says that breast milk develops the immunity system of a child and this immune system protects the child from various health problem throughout his life.

A research was conducted on 960 children aged between 4 to 12 years who were consuming regular asthma medicines.

According to the analysis made on the children suffering from asthma, those children who had been breastfed had a 45% lower risk of asthma exacerbations later in life as compared with children who had not been breastfed.

Dr. Anke Maitland-van der Zee, the senior author of the study, said that although breastfeeding can be seen as a protective factor for asthma exacerbation, the causal relation is still unclear.

According to another research conducted by Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands, children who were fed other milk or solids in addition to breast milk in first 4 months had an increased risk of wheezing, dry cough, and persistent phlegm as compared to children who were exclusively breastfed in their first 4 months.

In the early stage of life, changes in the composition and activity of the gut microbiome influence the immune system and these changes might indirectly lead to changes in asthma later in life.

Scientifically, the causal relationship between breast feeding and asthma is not still unknown. But research says that breast feeding plays a vital role in developing a child’s immune and respiratory system. So, in this way, breast feeding does reduce the child’s vulnerability towards Asthma.

-prepared by Shivani Chowdhary of NewsGram. Twitter handle: @cshivani31