Saturday December 16, 2017

Infant Mortality Rate declined in 2016, shows Health Ministry data

The Sample Registration System showed a significant 8% decline in country's IMR, despite the death of infants being more in rural areas

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Infant Mortality Rate in India
Infant Mortality Rate declines in India. Pixabay
  • The Infant Mortality Rate in India has declined from 37 per 1000 live births in 2015 to 34 per 1000 live births in 2016
  • The Sample Registration System showed a significant 8% decline in country’s IMR
  • According to the SRS Bulletin there has been a steady decline in the gender gap in India for child survival

New Delhi, October 2, 2017: The Infant Mortality Rate, IMR in India has declined by three points, from 37 per 1000 live births in 2015 to 34 per 1000 live births in 2016, according to the latest Ministry of Health and Family welfare’s data released on Friday.

This is indeed a progress looking at the two points decline last year. The 2019 target of IMR 28 per 1000 births, however, is still a long way to go.

The Sample Registration System showed a significant 8% decline in country’s IMR, despite the death of infants being more in rural areas. India has also recorded a remarkable drop in birth cohort, which has come down to below 25 million for the first time, according to the system.

I90000 fewer infant deaths were registered by India in 2016 as compared to 2015. The total estimated drop in the number of infant deaths have come down from 930000 (9.3 Lakhs) in 2015 to 840000 (8.4 lakhs) in 2016, mentions the Hans India report.

According to the SRS Bulletin there has been a steady decline in the gender gap in India for child survival. There has been reduction in the gender difference between female and male IMR.

“We are meeting our targets faster than the global targets, which means our efforts are showing results,” Union health minister JP Nadda had said during a post Cabinet briefing recently, according to the Hindustan Times report.

Also readSafe Rest Practices for Infants made Readily Available to New Parents through Emails and Texts!

“The results signify that the strategic approach of the ministry has started yielding dividends and the efforts of focusing on low performing states is paying off,” stated a health ministry statement.

“The countrywide efforts to increase the health service coverage through various initiatives, including strengthening of service delivery and drugs and diagnostics have worked well,” it further said.

All the states except Uttarakhand, among the Empowered Action Group (EAG) States and Assam have reported decline in IMR in comparison to 2015.

The report suggests this decline as of 4 points in Bihar, 3 in Assam, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh, Madhya Pradesh, and decline of two points in Chhattisgarh, Rajasthan and Odisha.

-prepared by Samiksha Goel of NewsGram. Twitter @goel_samiksha

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Gorakhpur Tragedy: Infant Deaths, Principal of Gorakhpur Medical College Rajeev Mishra Resigns

Death of 30 Infants, all that happened in Gorakhpur Tragedy

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Infant deaths in Gorakhpur Tragedy
Infant deaths in Gorakhpur Tragedy. Pixabay
  • Mishra was suspended due to his irresponsible act of allegedly delaying payment to the supplier of oxygen cylinders
  • The guilty will not be spared and the government would act cruelly
  • Adityanath also held a review meeting of healthcare

Lucknow, August 13, 2017: Gorakhpur Tragedy took many turns, the principal held responsible for the deaths due to lack of oxygen cylinders resigned, then Sidharth Nath Singh, Anupriya Patel, and Yogi Adityanath spoke on the serious issue and showed their concerns to the children’s families who suffered.

Dr. Rajeev Mishra, Principal, Baba Raghav Das Medical College in Gorakhpur, Uttar Pradesh who was suspended after the death of 30 infants (within a span of 48 hours) since August 10, resigned yesterday from the post.  The principal, Rajeev Mishra in his letter to the Director General of Medical Education and Training said that he has tendered his resignation from the post and takes the moral responsibility for the recent death of 30 children admitted to the hospital’s pediatric ward.

ALSO READ: Yogi Adityanath led UP Government to start booking Land Mafia under Gangster Act

UP Health Minister, Sidharth Nath Singh confirmed the resignation of Mishra from the post of the BRD medical college principal. According to PTI report, he said, “Yes, he has resigned. But no good, because we have already suspended him and initiated inquiry of his misdoings.” Sidharth Nath Singh and  UP Medical Education Minister Ashutosh Tandon said that Mishra was suspended due to his irresponsible act of allegedly delaying payment to the supplier of oxygen cylinders.

Minister of State in the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare Anupriya Patel said that the guilty will not be spared and the government would act cruelly and with a firm hand in order to punish callous officials responsible for it.

Uttar Pradesh Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath spoke on the Gorakhpur Tragedy and said that he had started the fight against Encephalitis in Gorakhpur.  His thoughts are with grieving families. Adityanath has toured the hospital twice since becoming chief minister.  He said, “We will be getting a detailed report on the cause of deaths. Not all of them were due to lack of oxygen. We have constituted a committee to be led by the chief secretary to inquire the role of oxygen supplier in the incident.” Following this incident, a Candle light march was held yesterday at BRD Medical College.

ALSO READ: Government seeks solution to Ramjanmbhoomi dispute through talks: Uttar Pradesh CM Yogi Adityanath in Ayodhya

Gorakhpur DM Rajeev Rautela said that 17 children have died in the neo-natal ward, 5 in the ward meant for patients suffering from acute encephalitis syndrome and 8 in the general ward. He denied the children’s death due to lack of oxygen though confirmed that indeed there was a shortage of liquid oxygen at the medical college and due to non-payment of Rs 70 lakh, the vendor supplying oxygen stopped the supply. He further added that part payment of Rs 35 lakh has been made to the vendor and that he had been requested not to disrupt the oxygen supply.

Adityanath also held a review meeting of healthcare, among other things. The father of an infant from Padrauna told media that there was an acute shortage of oxygen and accused authorities are lying to the media. “I am ready to hear the worst about my child,” he said amid flowing tears.

Another worried father, Deep Chandra belonging to Basti district also echoed similar sentiments and said that for the last 48 hours, there was no oxygen supply and the children admitted here at the hospital were left to die despite prayers and requests to the officials of the medical college. Dozens of children admitted to the hospital are hanging between life and death situation and in absence of proper treatment, medicines, and oxygen, they have lost hope, said many others.

– prepared by Kritika Dua of NewsGram. Twitter @DKritika08


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Ban on Electronic Cigarettes may lead to Illegal Trade of the Product: Tobacco Buddy

The Health Ministry of India is considering measures to ban e-cigarettes after an expert committee said that it has cancer causing properties.

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Electronic Cigarette
Electronic Cigarette. Pixabay
  • A ban on electronic cigarette may increase the smuggling of the products, says Tobacco Institute of India
  • The increase in smuggling of the product might affect the quality standards, therefore, risking the lives of people using it
  • After seeing the increasing unlawful practices many countries have reversed their decision

New Delhi, August 06, 2017: Prohibition of electronic cigarettes in India will lead to a rise in smuggling with no assurance of source and quality standard, said Tobacco Institute of India (TII) on Friday.

“In face of global growth trends and the increasing consumer acceptance of such products in India, a ban on legal business in electronic cigarettes in the country will pose a serious threat to illicit trade and large-scale smuggling of these products into the country with no assurance of source and quality standard,” said a statement by TII.

[sociallocker][/sociallocker]

E-cigarettes, also known as Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems (ENDS), considered to be safer than tobacco cigarettes, are handheld electronic devices that try to create a feeling of smoking tobacco.

They work by heating a liquid to generate an aerosol, commonly called a “vapor”, that the user inhales.

According to the TII, 160 signatory countries under World Health Organization’s Framework Convention on Tobacco Control, including the US, the UK, and EU countries have not imposed a prohibition on electronic cigarettes.

ALSO READ: E-Cigarettes loaded with nicotine-based liquid may be as Harmful as Smoking

Canada and New Zealand which had earlier prohibited ENDS have reversed their decision and allowed these products to be made available to people in their countries.

The TII says that the prohibition of e-cigarettes, would benefit illegal trade operators and promote foreign products owned by overseas entities in the absence of any domestic competition to challenge the illegal trade in these products.

The Health Ministry is considering measures to ban e-cigarettes after an expert committee said that it has cancer causing properties. (IANS)

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Why More than 580 Million People in India Have Poor Healthcare?

The maternal mortality ratio -- deaths of mothers per 100,000 births -- in these states is 32 per cent higher (244) than the national average (167)

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Healthcare
Healthcare in India. Pixabay
  • India’s average spending on health, as a proportion of GDP, is already the lowest among BRICS nations
  • It accounts for 70 percent of the country’s infant deaths, 75 percent of under-five deaths and 62 per cent of maternal deaths

July 07, 2017: Nine of India’s poorest states — home to 581 million or 48 percent of the population — account for 70 percent of the country’s infant deaths, 75 percent of under-five deaths and 62 per cent of maternal deaths, but do not spend even the money they have set aside for healthcare, according to an IndiaSpend analysis of 2017 Reserve Bank of India data on state budgets.

The data also reveal:

— The maternal mortality ratio — deaths of mothers per 100,000 births — in these states is 32 percent higher (244) than the national average (167).

— 38 per cent and 40 per cent children in these states are underweight (low weight-for-age) and stunted (low height-for-age), respectively, higher than the national average of 36 per cent and 38 per cent, respectively, according to 2015-16 national health data, the latest available.

— Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh and Rajasthan — with 372 million people, more than the combined populations of US, Australia, Sweden, and Greece –together contribute to about 58 percent of all child deaths in India.

The nine poorest large states — in official jargon called “high-focus”, a term that implies they need special attention — spent an average of 4.7 percent of their social sector expenditure on public health care and family welfare annually, marginally less than the national average of 4.8 percent. Social sector expenditure includes water supply and sanitation, housing and urban development.

India’s average spending on health, as a proportion of GDP, is already the lowest among BRICS nations.

The “high-focus” states are Bihar, Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Odisha, Rajasthan, Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh and Assam.

“In 2005, it was observed by (the) Government of India that some states were performing poorly in various indicators,” Avani Kapur, Senior Researcher, Accountability Initiative, an advocacy, told IndiaSpend. “So, these states were clubbed together as high-focus states and additional resources were given to improve those indicators.”

ALSO READ: “Dual-Disease Burden”? India’s Great Healthcare Challenge and Opportunity 

Of the nine poorest states, Rajasthan spent the highest (5.6 percent) and Bihar the lowest (3.8 percent) proportion of aggregate expenditure on public health care and family welfare, according to the RBI data on 2014-15 actual spending, lower than the budgeted 4.1 percent for Bihar and 6.6 per cent for Rajasthan.

Seven of the nine “high-focus” states report such underspending.

“High focus states allocate large amounts to social sector to improve their indicators but in reality, they spend only a small amount, compared to what is allotted,” Kapur said. “Hence, it is necessary to consider actual accounts in order to know the proper outcomes.”

So, while some “high-focus” states spent less money than set aside by their budgets, other states outspent — by proportion as ratio to aggregate expenditure — other larger states on healthcare and family welfare, but that had no relation to their healthcare indicators.

For instance, Rajasthan (68.6 million people) reported an MMR of 244 deaths per 100,000 births in 2011-13, the second lowest in India and worse off than Bangladesh and Nepal, both poorer countries, by per capita income. In contrast, Andhra Pradesh (84.6 million people), another big state, spent 4.1 per cent of total expenditure on public healthcare and family welfare but reported an MMR of 92, according to government data.

Since 2008, Rajasthan increased its spending by 0.8 per cent and its MMR decreased 23 per cent while Andhra Pradesh’s spending increased by 0.5 per cent and MMR decreased 31 per cent.

Assam, which spends 4.2 per cent of its total expenditure on health and has 31.2 million people, has an MMR of 300 deaths per 100,000 births — comparable to Rwanda and Sudan — while Kerala, which spends 5.3 per cent on 33.4 million, reported an MMR of 61, comparable to Sri Lanka and Poland.

Madhya Pradesh, which reported an infant mortality rate (IMR) — deaths per 1,000 live births — of 51 in 2015-16, spends 4.3 per cent of total expenditure on healthcare (against the budgeted 5 per cent) and is worse off than some of the world’s poorest countries, such as the Gambia and Ethiopia.

In the nine “high-focus” states, 72.6 per cent of all births were in healthcare institutions, a steady improvement but below the national average of 78.9 per cent, according to the 2015-16 National Family Health Survey (NFHS-4) data, the latest available.

Promoting community-based education on improved maternal and newborn care, and home-based treatment for newborn infections could enhance child survival in the “high- focus” states “significantly”, said a 2012 PLOS-ONE study. (IANS)