Sunday June 16, 2019

Infertility Treatment Linked With Slightly Higher Pregnancy Complications Risk, Says New Study

During pregnancy, such complications are often sudden and difficult to predict. Hence, it is important to identify women who may be at risk for these "near miss" events so that worse outcomes, including death, may be averted, the study suggested

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pregnant woman, hinduism
Infertility treatment linked with slightly higher pregnancy complications risk: Study. Pixabay

Women who have undergone infertility treatment, such as in-vitro fertilisation, are more likely to experience severe pregnancy complications, according to a new research.

The complications include severe postpartum hemorrhage and sepsis.Sepsis is a life-threatening illness caused by body’s response to an infection.

Maternal age greater than 40 years and being pregnant with twins or triplets are also linked with a higher rate of these complications.

“We found that the women who received infertility treatment, especially in-vitro fertilisation, were about 40 per cent more likely to experience severe pregnancy complication compared with women who gave birth without any treatment,” said lead author Natalie Dayan from the McGill University Health Centre in Canada.

Infertility, Pregnancy
During pregnancy, complications are often sudden and difficult to predict. (Representational Image). Pixabay

However, the number of women who develop these complications remains small, suggesting for most women who cannot conceive naturally, this treatment is safe, said Dayan.

For the study, researchers examined 813,719 live births and still-births and identified that 11,546 women conceived through infertility treatment.

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The women who conceive with infertility treatment are typically older, report higher incomes, are more often first-time mothers and carry multiple foetuses, said the study, published in the Canadian Medical Association Journal.

During pregnancy, such complications are often sudden and difficult to predict. Hence, it is important to identify women who may be at risk for these “near miss” events so that worse outcomes, including death, may be averted, the study suggested. (IANS)

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Depression May Put Women at Risk of Chronic Diseases, Says Study

Women with both conditions — depression and chronic diseases — were more likely to come from low-income households, be overweight and inactive, smoke tobacco and drink alcohol

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depression
Depression has significantly increased the risk of early death in women. Wikimedia

Women who experience symptoms of depression, even without a clinical diagnosis, are at an increased risk of developing multiple chronic diseases, according to a study.

The study, published in the journal American Psychological Association Health Psychology, examined 7,407 middle-aged women (45-50 years) for over 20 years.

During the study period, 43.2 per cent women experienced elevated symptoms of depression and just under half the cohort were diagnosed or took treatment for depression.

Of the total, 2,035 or 63.6 per cent developed multiple chronic diseases.

“These days many people suffer from multiple chronic diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke and cancer. We looked at how women progress in the development of these chronic diseases before and after the onset of depressive symptoms,” said Xiaolin Xu from the University of Queensland in Australia.

Depression
Depression is a common mental disorder. Flickr

“Experiencing depressive symptoms appeared to amplify the risk of chronic illness,” Xu said, adding that women suffering from depression were 1.8 times more likely to have multiple chronic health conditions.

“After women started experiencing these symptoms, they were 2.4 times more likely to suffer from multiple chronic conditions compared to women without depressive symptoms,” he added.

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Women with both conditions — depression and chronic diseases — were more likely to come from low-income households, be overweight and inactive, smoke tobacco and drink alcohol.

“Maintaining a healthy weight, exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet, and reducing harmful behaviours could help prevent and slow the progression of multiple chronic diseases,” Xu said. (IANS)