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Infosys Opens Technology Centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to Accelerate Innovation for Its American Enterprises

The centre, housed at the Arizona State University (ASU), will focus on autonomous technologies, Internet of Things (IOT), full-stack engineering

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Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
Arizona Governor Doug Ducey inaugurated the centre in the presence of state officials, company executives, employees and representatives of a few enterprises. Pixabay

Global software major Infosys has opened a technology centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to accelerate innovation for its American enterprises.

“We will hire 1,000 American techies over four years to work at the centre in the southwestern state for the local enterprises,” said the city-based IT behemoth in a statement, here on Saturday.

Arizona Governor Doug Ducey inaugurated the centre in the presence of state officials, company executives, employees and representatives of a few enterprises.

The centre, housed at the Arizona State University (ASU), will focus on autonomous technologies, Internet of Things (IOT), full-stack engineering, data science and cyber security.

Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
Global software major Infosys has opened a technology centre at Phoenix in Arizona, US, to accelerate innovation for its American enterprises. Pixabay

“Our investment in the centre will attract local and global talent. Hiring is underway to recruit around 500 techies by 2020 and reduce the IT skills gap in the state,” it said.

Infosys Chief Executive Salil Parikh said the Arizona centre, the company’s sixth of its kind in the US since 2017, was set up to help local enterprises go for digital transformation at the earliest.

“The centre allows us to collaborate with our clients across the country in an agile manner,” said Parekh.

The centre will also leverage and empower the workforce to bridge the skill gap in the market and accelerate the digital agenda of its clients.

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“Our focus will be on harnessing, modelling and scaling a new model for workforce development in the US, where the private sector has a key role to implement it (model) or learning and on-the-job training,” said company’s president Ravi Kumar.

The centre boasts of living labs, showcasing prototypes in virtual reality, augmented reality and robotic technologies and will help foster co-creation, training and collaboration.

Lauding Infosys for foraying into the state, Ducey said its presence reinforced Arizona’s reputation as a tech hub and one of the best places to relocate and expand.

The centre will allow the company to develop cross-functional solutions to pressing business challenges in machine learning, artificial intelligence, user experience and advanced digital technologies, such as big data and cloud.

Infosys, Technology, Phoenix
“We will hire 1,000 American techies over four years to work at the centre in the southwestern state for the local enterprises,” said the city-based IT behemoth in a statement, here on Saturday. Pixabay

As part of its commitment to workforce development and bridging the STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) skill gap in the US, the $11 billion outsourcing firm also announced a partnership with InStride to allow its employees complete degree programmes and education courses through ASU.

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“Infosys’ commitment to Arizona and learning speaks of the strength of talent in our community. We welcome it as a partner that will boost our competitiveness in the global economy,” said ASU president Michael Crow. (IANS)

Next Story

Smartphone Cameras Picture Perfect or Just a Gimmick? : Megapixel War

According to industry experts, it is an attempt by the brands to differentiate themselves from competition and remain at the top of the consumers' mindshare.

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Smartphone
Chinese Smartphone makers have sounded the bugle for a megapixel war and the users are in for some sweet deals as camera sensors grow in specifications at affordable price points. Pixabay

In 2012, Nokia, which was at the top of the mobile industry, brought 808 PureView, a Symbian operating system (OS)-based smartphone with an insane 41MP camera that created quite a buzz.

Since then, Android-based smartphones started gaining traction and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) began adding more megapixels to the cameras to lure the crowd.

Now Chinese smartphone makers have sounded the bugle for a megapixel war and the users are in for some sweet deals as camera sensors grow in specifications at affordable price points.

In India, Realme, which initially started off as a subsidiary of Chinese handset maker OPPO, became the first to introduce a 64MP camera smartphone — Realme XT — few weeks ago followed by Xiaomi, which has recently unveiled its Redmi Note 8 Pro with 64MP.

Samsung has even created a 108MP sensor for upcoming smartphones.

As many as 50 per cent of smartphones sold globally will have three or more camera sensors by the end of 2021, says Counterpoint Research.

Smartphone
These numbers indicate the availability of the sensor size at a cost that can let Smartphone brands bring it in a model at affordable price points.
Pixabay

According to industry experts, it is an attempt by the brands to differentiate themselves from competition and remain at the top of the consumers’ mindshare.

“It should be seen as a marketing plank, which enables brands to showcase innovation for a feature which is important for smartphone consumers these days,” Navkendar Singh, Research Director-Devices and Ecosystem, India & South Asia, International Data Corporation (IDC) told IANS.

These numbers indicate the availability of the sensor size at a cost that can let smartphone brands bring it in a model at affordable price points.

“In early 2020, we should expect launches with 92MP and 108MP in the market. Beyond a certain megapixel capability, a normal consumer cannot feel the difference in the photograph purely from megapixel viewpoint,” Singh noted.

According to Counterpoint Research, Xiaomi was at the second spot with a 17 per cent share in the Rs 15,001-Rs 20,000 price segment in India in Q2 2019, while Realme ranked sixth with 6 per cent share in the same period.

However, Realme inched up to the fourth position with 12 per cent market share, whereas Xiaomi slipped to the fifth spot with a share of 9 per cent in July-August.

“In Q2 2019, 14 per cent smartphones shipped with 48MP lens cameras and 70 per cent with two or more rear cameras.

Smartphone
Android-based Smartphone Companies started gaining traction and original equipment manufacturers (OEMs) began adding more megapixels to the cameras to lure the crowd. Pixabay

“However, merely adding a bigger megapixel sensor does not determine higher picture quality,” Karn Chauhan, Research Analyst at Counterpoint Research told IANS.

There are multiple factors, such as the lens, the size of the aperture, Image Signal Processor (ISP), software algorithms, AI, etc. which come into play while determining the quality of the picture.

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“The tech advancements, exemplified by Samsung eISOCELL Bright GW1′, the 64MP image sensor, used by the likes of Realme and Xiaomi, are essentially pushing the envelope for better, low light HDR photography and brighter, detailed photographs mimicking very closely the human eye vision,” Prabhu Ram, Head, Industry Intelligence Group (IIG), CMR, told IANS. (IANS)