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Ingredients That do Wonders For Your Skin

Swati Kapoor, Co-founder of SoulTree and Reena Chhabra, Chief Executive Officer of Nykaa Beauty (FSN E Commerce Ventures Pvt Ltd) list some of the top picks for ingredient solutions

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Ingredients That do Wonders For Your Skin
Ingredients That do Wonders For Your Skin. Pixabay

There has been a rise in using rare and unusual ingredients in beauty and personal care products because of its benefit. From Sea Buckthorn, Moringa to Pomegranate Seed and Olive oil, its time for you to add some variants in your beauty regime.

Brands like SoulTree are using different oils in the manufacturing of skincare products, as well as colour cosmetics and the same is with Nykaa that has expanded its ‘Naturals’ portfolio with the launch of a curated line of pure cold pressed carrier oils, offering numerous benefits for hair, skin and nails.

Swati Kapoor, Co-founder of SoulTree and Reena Chhabra, Chief Executive Officer of Nykaa Beauty (FSN E Commerce Ventures Pvt Ltd) list some of the top picks for ingredient solutions.

* Sea Buckthorn: With a long history of usage in folk medicine, the unique high fatty acid and high vitamin content of this oil makes it beneficial for various concerns of skin, hair, and nails. Sea Buckthorn oil has high anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and can be used as a natural moisturizer, cleanser and exfoliator that gives a golden glow.

* Moringa: Moringa oil has soothing and anti-inflammatory properties along with anti-ageing benefits and it also rejuvenates dull tired looking skin. Extracted from the seeds of Moringa Oleifera, this oil is extremely rich in phytonutrients. Nutrient-rich, it is light on the skin and makes an excellent moisturizer.

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Representational image. Pixabay

* Marula: This oil contains a high amount of Omega 6 and Omega 9 as well as essential antioxidants. This elixir of youth can miraculously reverse the damage done by UV rays, works for every skin type, balances moisture levels, treats acne, blemishes and scars and is a boon for hair care.

* Pomegranate seed: Pomegranate seed oil is an exceptional cosmetic ingredient and aids in the production of collagen. Pomegranate seed oil is full of antioxidants like Punic acid (Omega 5), Vitamin K, C, B6, Folate and Potassium. It heals blemishes and scars as well as revitalizes dull, dry hair and protects it from pollution. It has excellent regenerative and anti-inflammatory benefits, making it a powerful healer for mature and dry skin.

* Olive oil: Olive oil contains vitamin E, an antioxidant that provides nourishment to the skin and improves skin health. The light and non-greasy texture of olive oil helps in moisturising the skin and in treating inflammation and acne.

Also Read: How to Get Rid of Dark Circles

* Almond oil: Very light in texture, Almond oil is rich in vitamin E and protects the skin against oxidative stress. It helps prevent acne and puffiness under the eyes.

* Coconut oil: Coconut oil is a natural moisturiser and is enriched with anti-bacterial properties. It helps strengthen the skin barrier and keeps the skin soft and smooth.

* Sunflower oil: Sunflower oil contains a high quantity of vitamin E, A, C, and D. It helps in preventing skin problems and improves the health of the skin by preventing acne, unclogging the pores and moisturising it. Being rich in nutrients and antioxidants, it also helps in reducing wrinkles and fine lines. (Bollywood Country)

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Skin Exposure to UVB Light Alters Gut Bacteria For Good: Study

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome

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UVB Light causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, it has so far been shown only in rodents. Pixabay

Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans — possibly via vitamin D which can help explain the protective role of UVB in inflammatory diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Sun exposure, vitamin D levels and the mix of bacteria in our gut are each associated with risk of inflammatory conditions like MS and IBD, said scientists from University of British Columbia.

Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome.

However, that UVB, therefore, causes gut microbiome changes, via vitamin D production, has so far been shown only in rodents.

In a new clinical pilot study, researchers tested the effect of skin UVB exposure on the human gut microbiome.

Healthy female volunteers were given three, one-minute sessions of full-body UVB exposure in a single week.

Before and after treatment, stool samples were taken for analysis of gut bacteria – as well blood samples for vitamin D levels.

Skin UVB exposure significantly increased gut microbial diversity, but only in subjects who were not taking vitamin D supplements.

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Exposure to UVB in sunlight is well-known to drive vitamin D production in the skin, and recent studies suggest that vitamin D alters the human gut microbiome. Pixabay

“Prior to UVB exposure, these women had a less diverse and balanced gut microbiome than those taking regular vitamin D supplements,” reported Professor Bruce Vallance, who led the University of British Columbia study.

“UVB exposure boosted the richness and evenness of their microbiome to levels indistinguishable from the supplemented group, whose microbiome was not significantly changed”.

Published in Frontiers in Microbiology, the analysis suggests that vitamin D mediates the change — which could help explain the protective effect of UVB light in inflammatory diseases like MS and IBD.

The largest effect was an increase in the relative abundance of “Lachnospiraceae” bacteria after the UVB light exposures.

This indicates that vitamin D at least partly mediates UVB-induced gut microbiome changes.

The study is not designed to show the exact mechanism by which the microbiome changes occur, but both UVB and vitamin D are known to influence the immune system.

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Skin exposure to ultra-violet B, also known as UVB Light radiation from the Sun can alter the gut microbiome in humans. Pixabay

“It is likely that exposure to UVB light somehow alters the immune system in the skin initially, then more systemically, which in turn affects how favourable the intestinal environment is for the different bacteria,” suggests Vallance.

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The results have implications for people who are undergoing UVB phototherapy, said scientists. (IANS)