Sunday January 19, 2020

Newly Developed Inhaler to Treat Migraine Without Medicine, says Study

While 45 per cent people experienced an effect the first time, and that number rose to 78 per cent the second time

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Migraine
Migraines that affect vision may increase irregular heartbeat risk. Pixabay

Some migraine patients can cut down on medication or stop using it completely by using a newly developed inhaler which changes the composition of the air we breathe, results of a clinical trial say.

Migraines occur as part of a chain reaction during which the veins in the brain contract and the blood cannot therefore supply the brain with sufficient oxygen, the researchers said.

In the study, the team from the Aarhus University in Denmark examined a small group of patients who suffer from migraine with aura, which is where they experience either sensory or visual disturbances before the painful headaches begin.

The novel inhaler slightly changes the body’s own molecules.

It utilises carbon dioxide and oxygen, which are the body’s natural molecules for mobilising its own defence against migraine attacks.

Migraine
Migraine is a risk factor for sudden sensorineural hearing loss — characterized by rapid loss of hearing in one or both ears, which may occur immediately or over the course of several days. Pixabay

“The inhaler expands the blood vessels that supply the brain with oxygen by up to seventy per cent and thereby stops the destructive chain reaction,” said Troels Johansen, from the varsity.

Johansen added that the effect of the treatment starts after a few seconds.

The results, published in the journal Cephalalgia, showed that the effect of the pain relief increased significantly with each use of the inhaler.

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While 45 per cent people experienced an effect the first time, and that number rose to 78 per cent the second time.

“The study shows some very significant physiological effects in the body,” Johansen said, adding that the team is now planning to conduct a large clinical trial that will also include migraine without aura and chronic migraine. (IANS)

Next Story

Sleep Disturbances can Trigger Migraine Attacks: Study

Sleep disturbance linked to migraine risk

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sleep migraine
A disturbed sleep can affect patients with Migraine. Pixabay

Researchers have found that nearly half of all patients who suffer migraines report sleep disturbance as a trigger for their headaches.

The research team from Brigham and Women’s Hospital in US conducted a study using objective measures of sleep to date to evaluate the relationship between sleep and migraine headaches.

The study’s findings, published in the journal Neurology, generally support patients’ reports of sleep disturbance as a trigger for migraines.

In the assessments and actigraphy measurements, the research team observed that sleep fragmentation — time spent in bed, but not asleep — was linked to migraine onset not on the next day but rather the day after that.

“Sleep is multi-dimensional, and when we look at certain aspects such as sleep, we found that low sleep efficiency, which is the amount of time you’re awake in bed when you’re trying to sleep, was associated with migraines not on the day immediately following, but on the day after that,” said study researcher Suzanne Bertisch from Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre in US.

Migraine
Time spent in bed, but not being asleep is linked to migraine onset not on the next day but a day after that. Pixabay

For the results, Bertisch and colleagues conducted a prospective cohort study of 98 adults with episodic migraines, who reported at least two headaches, but had fewer than 15 days each month with a headache.

The participants completed electronic diaries twice a day, recording details about their sleep, headaches and health habits for six weeks.

During that time, they also wore a wrist actigraph to bed to objectively capture their sleep patterns.

The team adjusted data for other migraine triggers, including daily caffeine intake, alcohol intake, physical activity, stress and more.

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Over the course of six weeks, participants reported 870 headaches. Nightly sleep duration of 6.5 hours or less and poor sleep quality were not associated with migraines the day immediately following (Day Zero) or the day after that (Day One).

However, sleep fragmentation measured by both diary and actigraphy were associated with higher odds of having a migraine on Day One, the study said. (IANS)