Sunday April 21, 2019

Complex Inhalers May Prevent Patients From Taking Medicine

For the study, published in the journal Respiratory Medicine, researchers recruited a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and compared how well they could use four types of commonly prescribed inhalers to a healthy control group

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inhalers
Researchers discovered that only 15 percent of the arthritis patients could complete all the steps to use one type of inhaler. Pixabay

Patients suffering from the respiratory disease with arthritis could struggle to manage their condition because their inhalers are too fiddly for them to use, a study has claimed.

According to the researchers, medical professionals should check that patients with respiratory diseases and rheumatoid arthritis can use their inhalers properly to reduce the risk of their being unable to take their medicines.

“Pharmacists, doctors, and nurses need to make these easy checks not only to help patients achieve better outcomes but also reduce demand on the NHS, not to mention taking away the stress and irritation of a complex and difficult process for the patient,” said co-author of the study Matthew Jones, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology at the University of Bath.

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Respiratory diseases, including asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis often affects the hands making complex or finely controlled actions difficult and painful, the researcher said.

inhalers
Two other commonly prescribed inhalers saw the arthritis group struggle to complete the operating steps compared to the control group (50 percent to 91 percent, and 77 percent to 97 percent). Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Respiratory Medicine, researchers recruited a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and compared how well they could use four types of commonly prescribed inhalers to a healthy control group.

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They discovered that only 15 percent of the arthritis patients could complete all the steps to use one type of inhaler.

“No one wants to see patients struggle needlessly to take the medicines they need to manage serious conditions,” the researcher said.

“These results show how important it is that health professionals make sure people can use any inhaler they prescribe,” Jones noted. (IANS)

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Car Pollution: The Cause of Asthma Among Over 350,000 Children in India

South Korea (31 per cent) had the highest proportion of traffic pollution-attributable childhood asthma incidence. The UK ranked 24th of the 194 countries, the US 25th, China 19th, and India 58th

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odd even scheme

Traffic pollution caused asthma among 350,000 children in India, the second largest after China, in 2015, finds a Lancet study that analysed 194 countries.

The study, published in the Lancet Planetary Health, found that the largest number of cases (760,000) of traffic pollution-related asthma were in China.

It could be because China has the second largest population of children and the third highest concentration of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), which is an indicator of traffic pollution.

India had the next largest number of cases (350,000) due to its large population of children, said researchers from the George Washington University in the US. The US (240,000), Indonesia (160,000) and Brazil (140,000) had the next largest burdens.

“Our findings suggest millions of new cases of paediatric asthma could be prevented in cities around the world by reducing air pollution,” said Susan C. Anenberg, Associate Professor at the George Washington University in the US.

Car emissions contribute to global climate change. Pixabay

Globally, the study suggests there are 170 new cases of traffic pollution-related asthma per 100,000 children every year, and 13 per cent of childhood asthma cases diagnosed each year are linked to traffic pollution.

South Korea (31 per cent) had the highest proportion of traffic pollution-attributable childhood asthma incidence. The UK ranked 24th of the 194 countries, the US 25th, China 19th, and India 58th.

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India ranks below other countries for this metric because although levels of other pollutants (particularly PM2.5) in the country are among the highest in the world, NO2 levels (between 2010 and 2012) in Indian cities appear to be lower than or comparable with European and US cities, the researchers said.

“Improving access to cleaner forms of transportation, like electric public transport and active commuting by cycling and walking, would not only lower NO2 levels but would also reduce asthma, enhance physical fitness and cut greenhouse gas emissions,” Anenberg said. (IANS)