Wednesday December 11, 2019

Complex Inhalers May Prevent Patients From Taking Medicine

For the study, published in the journal Respiratory Medicine, researchers recruited a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and compared how well they could use four types of commonly prescribed inhalers to a healthy control group

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Researchers discovered that only 15 percent of the arthritis patients could complete all the steps to use one type of inhaler. Pixabay

Patients suffering from the respiratory disease with arthritis could struggle to manage their condition because their inhalers are too fiddly for them to use, a study has claimed.

According to the researchers, medical professionals should check that patients with respiratory diseases and rheumatoid arthritis can use their inhalers properly to reduce the risk of their being unable to take their medicines.

“Pharmacists, doctors, and nurses need to make these easy checks not only to help patients achieve better outcomes but also reduce demand on the NHS, not to mention taking away the stress and irritation of a complex and difficult process for the patient,” said co-author of the study Matthew Jones, Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology at the University of Bath.

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Respiratory diseases, including asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common in people with rheumatoid arthritis. Arthritis often affects the hands making complex or finely controlled actions difficult and painful, the researcher said.

inhalers
Two other commonly prescribed inhalers saw the arthritis group struggle to complete the operating steps compared to the control group (50 percent to 91 percent, and 77 percent to 97 percent). Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Respiratory Medicine, researchers recruited a group of patients with rheumatoid arthritis and compared how well they could use four types of commonly prescribed inhalers to a healthy control group.

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They discovered that only 15 percent of the arthritis patients could complete all the steps to use one type of inhaler.

“No one wants to see patients struggle needlessly to take the medicines they need to manage serious conditions,” the researcher said.

“These results show how important it is that health professionals make sure people can use any inhaler they prescribe,” Jones noted. (IANS)

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Flavoured E-Cigarettes Affect Airways, Worsen Asthma

Certain flavoured e-cigarettes, even without nicotine, may change how airways, affected by an allergic disease, function, thus worsening the severity of asthma

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A flavour multipack for the Juul vaping device. Sweet-flavored electronic cigarettes promote youth vaping. Wikimedia Commons

Certain flavoured e-cigarettes, even without nicotine, may change how airways, affected by an allergic disease, function, thus worsening the severity of diseases such as asthma, say researchers.

For the first time, a model of asthma was used to investigate the effect of a range of popular e-cigarette flavours, with and without nicotine.

“This is especially important for those with respiratory disease, whom are vulnerable to the effects of smoking,” Dr Chapman said.

“The majority of e-cigarette smokers use flavoured liquids but there is some evidence that flavour additives can be toxic when inhaled,” said Dr David Chapman from from the University of Technology Sydney (UTS).

The use of e-cigarettes has dramatically increased in the past few years, especially among younger smokers globally.

e-cigarettes, flavoured, asthma, airways
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) said Friday that they were investigating 215 cases of a serious lung disease possibly related to the use of e-cigarettes. VOA

Despite the suggestion they are a healthier alternative to tobacco cigarettes, there is a lack of evidence in both animal studies and human data on the effect of e-cigarettes on lung function.

The researchers found that some flavoured e-cigarettes, even in the absence of nicotine, can worsen disease severity.

“The exact effects on features of asthma were dependent upon the specific flavour, suggesting not all flavoured e-cigarettes will have the same consequences on lung health,” Dr Chapman said in the study published in Scientific Reports.

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In this study, the flavour Black Licorice exaggerated airway inflammation whereas Cinnacide had the opposite effect, suppressing airway inflammation.

The researchers didn’t analyse the liquids directly, to confirm what they contained, however there is evidence from previous research that flavours categorised as “buttery/creamy” and “cinnamon”, which likely include “Banana Pudding” and “Cinnacide”, respectively, are toxic.

Caution should be taken in promoting the use of flavoured e-cigarettes to patients with respiratory disease such as asthma and that policy makers should consider restricting the use of flavoured e-cigarettes, the team added. (IANS)