Wednesday November 20, 2019
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Instagram Announces a Unique Feature to Curb Online Bullying

This move gives people a chance to reflect and undo their comment and prevents the recipient from receiving the harmful comment notification

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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. VOA

To curb online bullying, Facebook-owned Instagram has announced a unique feature where a user can “shadow ban” or “restrict” a bully from commenting on his or her posts.

Once you “restrict” someone, comments on your posts from that person will only be visible to that person.

You can choose to make a restricted person’s comments visible to others by approving their comments.

“We’ve heard from young people in our community that they’re reluctant to block, unfollow, or report their bully because it could escalate the situation, especially if they interact with their bully in real life,” Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram, announced late Monday.

“We wanted to create a feature that allows people to control their Instagram experience, without notifying someone who may be targeting them”.

In this upcoming feature, “restricted” people won’t be able to see when you’re active on Instagram or when you’ve read their direct messages.

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FILE – The Instagram icon is displayed on a mobile screen in Los Angeles. VOA

Instagram is using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to detect bullying and other types of harmful content in comments, photos and videos.

“We have started rolling out a new feature powered by AI that notifies people when their comment may be considered offensive before it’s posted,” informed Mosseri.

This move gives people a chance to reflect and undo their comment and prevents the recipient from receiving the harmful comment notification.

Also Read: Zomato Acquires Food Donation Start-up ‘Feeding India’

“From early tests of this feature, we have found that it encourages some people to undo their comment and share something less hurtful once they have had a chance to reflect,” said Instagram head.

“We can do more to prevent bullying from happening on Instagram, and we can do more to empower the targets of bullying to stand up for themselves,” he added. (IANS)

Next Story

Facebook, Instagram Down Again, Users Clueless: Report

The biggest outage Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram faced was in March that lasted for more than 14 hours. Facebook blamed a 'database' overload for the problem

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Facebook, Messenger and Instagram apps are displayed on an iPhone, March 13, 2019, in New York. VOA

Users from different parts of the world took to Twitter on Tuesday to report problems using Facebook, Instagram and Messenger, including several parts in the US and the UK.

According to Downdetector website which monitors online outages, the outages did not appear to hit the entire Facebook network but several areas reported disruption in services.

While 63 per cent reported a total blackout, 19 per cent had problems in logging in while 16 per cent faced problems with their News Feed.

“Facebook always getting hacked and now disabled… Why can’t Facebook work right. I can’t get on my new account because it was disabled,” posted an user.

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An iPhone displays the app for Facebook in New Orleans, Aug. 11, 2019. VOA

“Okay, is Facebook Messenger down?” posted another. Users said the Facebook app failed to send or load messages.

The social networking platform was yet to identify or comment on the latest outage.

Also Read: Tech Giant Google Acquires Enterprise Software Firm ‘CloudSimple’

Facebook and Instagram suffered a total outage in the UK and in some parts of Europe in September as thousands of users went on to Twitter to complain about not being able to use the social media platforms.

The biggest outage Facebook, WhatsApp and Instagram faced was in March that lasted for more than 14 hours. Facebook blamed a ‘database’ overload for the problem. (IANS)