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Instagram to Expand its ‘Hide Like Count’ Feature to Six More Countries

In addition, Instagram has rolled out a new design on its Stories option in India

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Instagram
Instagram app logo is displayed on a mobile screen in Los Angeles. VOA

Facebook owned photo-messaging app Instagram is giving more users the option to publicly hide the ‘Like’ count on their posts as it is expanding the feature to six more countries.

First announced in May for users in Canada, now those in Ireland, Italy, Japan, Brazil, Australia, and New Zealand will also be able to hide the ‘Like’ count on their posts, The Verge reported on Wednesday.

The company said the purpose behind the move is to remove the pressure among users who are concerned about the reach of their posts and impressions.

instagram
“If Instagram rolls out the feature, it could put the emphasis back on sharing art and self-expression, not trying to win some popularity contest,” the report added. Pixabay

ALSO READ: Your Spending Habits May Reveal a Lot About your Personality Traits

“We want people to worry a little bit less about how many likes they’re getting on Instagram and spend a bit more time connecting with the people that they care about,” Adam Mosseri, Head of Instagram, said during a conference in California, back in April.

Earlier in July, Instagram released an Artificial Intelligence-powered feature that lets users know if they are about to post an offensive comment. In addition, Instagram has rolled out a new design on its Stories option in India. (IANS)

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Instagram Helps Women to Overcome Miscarriage Distress: Study

The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians

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Instagram
As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage. Pixabay

Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says.

The study, published in the journal Obstetrics & Gynecology, found that the content posted by Instagram users included rich descriptions of the medical and physical experiences of miscarriage, and the emotional spectrum of having a miscarriage and coping with those emotions, the social aspect, and family identity.

“I find it endlessly fascinating that women are opening up to essentially strangers about things that they hadn’t even told their partners or families,” says Dr. Riley. “But this is how powerful this community is,” said Amy Henderson Riley, Assistant Professor at the Jefferson College of Population Health, Thomas Jefferson University, US.

The findings are based on a qualitative research study on 200 posts of text and pictures shared by Instagram users.

“What surprised me the most was how many women and their partners identified as parents after their miscarriage and how the miscarriage lasted into their family identity after a successful pregnancy,” said Rebecca Mercier, Assistant Professor at Thomas Jefferson University.

“The extent to which this loss affects women and their families, and the longevity of their grief is a blind spot for clinicians,” Mercier said.

These personal accounts also provided insight into patients’ perspectives of typically defined experiences.

For example, in the clinic, the typical definition of recurrent pregnancy loss is after three pregnancies. However, the researchers found that many patients who had had two or more miscarriages identified with having recurrent pregnancy loss.

Instagram
Despite its common occurrence, there is still a lot of stigma surrounding miscarriage and many women find that their emotional and psychological needs are unmet as they go through a devastating grieving process. But for some, Instagram has emerged as a tool to cope with such distress, a study says. Pixabay

“I’m hoping that this study will encourage clinicians to point patients to social media as a potential coping tool, as well as to approach this subject with bereaved and expecting parents with more respect and empathy,” Mercier said.

Social media is becoming a common avenue for patient testimonials. For example, the short video-sharing platform TikTok has recently become a home for some users to make videos sharing their personal health struggles.

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“As far as we know, this is the first study to look at the intersection of Instagram and miscarriage,” Riley said.

“But this is a drop in the bucket. Social media platforms are evolving rapidly and a theoretically grounded research must follow,” she added. (IANS)