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Instagram Gets its New CEO- Adam Mosseri

Instagram was founded in 2010 and bought by Facebook two years later for $1 billion

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Instagram
Instagram is an affordable way to boost your content as well. Pixabay

Adam Mosseri, a veteran 10-year Facebook executive, will become the new head of Instagram, outgoing co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger announced Monday.

“We are thrilled to hand over the reins to a product leader with a strong design background and a focus on craft and simplicity,” Systrom and Krieger said in a press release.The pair announced their resignation last week without giving a clear explanation.

Instagram CEO
Adam Mosseri, then-Vice President of Product Management for Facebook, speaks during the 2016 TechCrunch Disrupt in San Francisco, California, Sept. 14, 2016. (VOA)

Mosseri, 35, has been Instagram’s head of product since May. He began as a designer at Facebook in 2008, and recently ran its News Feed. His appointment comes among fears that with the departure of Instagram independent-minded founders, the app will become more like Facebook: Cluttered with features, and invasive of user’s personal data.

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Instagram was founded in 2010 and bought by Facebook two years later for $1 billion. While Facebook has struggled to hold onto younger users, Instagram remains popular with teens. It has also remained scandal-free, while Facebook has taken heat for numerous scandals including the spread of fake news, alleged exploitation of user data with third parties, electoral interference, and its use as a platform for radical leaders to spread propaganda in developing countries. (VOA)

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg Accepts That The Social media Giant May Have To Pay Excessive Taxes

Zuckerberg will tell the conference that he's glad that that the OECD is looking at tax reform, which Facebook also wants

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Mark Zukerberg
The billionaire social network founder is due to meet members of the European Union's executive Commission in Brussels and speak at the Munich Security Conference in Germany. VOA

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg plans to throw his support behind international reforms that would require Silicon Valley tech giants to pay more tax in Europe.

The billionaire social network founder is due to meet members of the European Union’s executive Commission in Brussels and speak at the Munich Security Conference in Germany.

Zuckerberg is expected to tell the conference  that he’s backing plans for digital tax reform on a global scale proposed by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. According to an excerpt of his speech provided in advance, Zuckerberg will say, “I understand that there’s frustration about how tech companies are taxed in Europe.”

Zuckerberg will tell the conference that he’s glad that that the OECD is looking at tax reform, which Facebook also wants. “And we accept that may mean we have to pay more tax and pay it in different places under a new framework,” Zuckerberg will reportedly say.

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Mark Zuckerberg Accepts That Facebook May Have to Pay More Taxes. VOA

The OECD plans would require digital and internet companies, including social media platforms, to pay more tax in countries where they have significant consumer-facing activities and generate profits.

The current system for taxing multinationals is based on where they are physically located, which sees internet companies such as Facebook pay the majority of their tax in the United States. The situation is even more complicated in the European Union, where multinationals largely pay taxes on business done across the region in the one country that serves as their EU base, often a low-tax haven.

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Tech companies have faced criticism for not paying enough tax in come countries. The U.S., meanwhile, has criticized the OECD plans, arguing they discriminate against big Silicon Valley companies. (VOA)