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Instagram Rolls Out New Feature Helping Parents Monitor Their Teenage Kids

For its one billion app users, Instagram also offers other tools like comment controls, the ability to report unwanted interactions.

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Instagram back after global outage. Pixabay
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 Facebook-owned Instagram has built a “Parent’s Guide” focusing on privacy, interactions and time management for parents who have teenage children using the platform.

“We’ve included the basics of our app and description of our tools, plus a discussion guide for how parents and guardians can have an open conversation with their teens about Instagram,” Marne Levine, Chief Operating Officer, Instagram wrote in a blog post late on Thursday.

The 10 listed discussion questions have been designed to help parents learn more about how teenagers are using the social media app and to ensure that the app is being used in a positive way like discussing whether they want to keep their accounts public or private.

 

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Instagram, Pixabay

 

The photo-messaging app has also developed a video guide that “gathered a group of parents who work at Instagram to talk about the tools they use to foster positive online experiences for their teens.”

 

For its one billion app users, the app also offers other tools like comment controls, the ability to report unwanted interactions and most recently, a suite of features to help users manage time on the app.

Also Read: US to Probe Social Media Giants Like Facebook, Twitter Over Censorship Concern

“We’re committed to being here every step of the way to make sure parents and their teens have the tools they need to make the choices that are right for them,” Levine added. (IANS)

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Unable To Find The Source of Fake Accounts: Facebook

Sample images provided by Facebook showed posts on a wide range of issues.

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Lexi Sturdy, election war room lead, sits at her desk in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content on the platform, in Menlo Park, California. VOA

Facebook said Tuesday it had been unable to determine who was behind dozens of fake accounts it took down shortly before the 2018 U.S. midterm elections.

“Combined with our takedown last Monday, in total we have removed 36 Facebook accounts, 6 Pages, and 99 Instagram accounts for coordinated inauthentic behavior,” Nathaniel Gleicher, head of cybersecurity policy, wrote on the company’s blog.

At least one of the Instagram accounts had well over a million followers, according to Facebook.

Facebook, U.S.
A man works in the war room, where Facebook monitors election-related content, in Menlo Park, Calif. VOA

A website that said it represented the Russian state-sponsored Internet Research Agency claimed responsibility for the accounts last week, but Facebook said it did not have enough information to connect the agency that has been called a troll farm.

“As multiple independent experts have pointed out, trolls have an incentive to claim that their activities are more widespread and influential than may be the case,” Gleicher wrote.

Sample images provided by Facebook showed posts on a wide range of issues. Some advocated on behalf of social issues such as women’s rights and LGBT pride, while others appeared to be conservative users voicing support for President Donald Trump.

Also Read: The Year Of Women in U.S. Politics

The viewpoints on display potentially fall in line with a Russian tactic identified in other cases of falsified accounts. A recent analysis of millions of tweets by the Atlantic Council found that Russian trolls often pose as members on either side of contentious issues in order to maximize division in the United States. (VOA)