Tuesday June 19, 2018

Study Shows that Intermittent Fasting May Up Diabetes Risk

If you are doing intermittent fasting to reduce your weight, you may be at higher risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

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Diabetes. Pixabay
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If you are doing intermittent fasting to reduce your weight, you may be at higher risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone — insulin — which may increase the risk of diabetes.

The findings, presented at the Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018, in Barcelona, suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight loss programmes.

Type-2 diabetes is a growing global epidemic that is often attributed to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle, so is closely linked to obesity.

Blood sugar is partially regulated by the hormone insulin, which is produced by the pancreas if insulin levels are too low, or the body becomes resistant to its effects. Type-2 diabetes and high blood sugar levels can cause serious health issues, including heart, kidney and eye damage.

The findings are important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes as well as the general population, the research said.
Diabetes representational image, Pixabay

“This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues,” said co-author Ana Bonassa from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

For the study, the researchers examined the effects of fasting every other day on the body weight, free radical levels and insulin function of normal, adult rats, over three months.

Also Read: Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

Although the rats’ body weight and food intake decreased as expected over the study period, the amount of fat tissue in their abdomen actually increased, the researcher said.

The cells of the pancreas that release insulin showed damage, with the presence of increased levels of free radicals and markers of insulin resistance were also detected, the researchers added. (IANS)

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Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From ‘Surgery in a Pill’

Novel 'surgery in a pill' to reverse diabetes

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Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From 'Surgery in a Pill'
Study: Diabetes Treatment Gets Boost From 'Surgery in a Pill'. (IANS)

Researchers have developed “surgery in a pill” that can reduce post-meal blood sugar spikes and help reverse diabetes.

When the pill was administered in rats, it delivered a substance that could temporarily coat the intestine, forming a thin barrier that alters nutrient contact and lowers blood glucose response after a meal, the researchers said.

“We envision a pill that a patient can take before a meal that transiently coats the gut to replicate the effects of surgery,” said Jeff Karp, a bioengineer at the Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) in Massachusetts, US.

After a meal, blood sugar levels rise and can stay elevated over time.

However, one hour after the pill was administered to the rats, the response to glucose was lowered by 47 per cent.

“What we’ve developed here is essentially, ‘surgery in a pill’,” added Yuhan Lee, a materials scientist in the BWH.

This response was temporary, and after three hours, the effect essentially disappeared, the study showed.

Representational image.
Representational image. Pixabay

For the study, published in the journal Nature Materials, the team selected a substance known as sucralfate — an FDA-approved drug that is used in the treatment of gastrointestinal ulcers — to adhere to the small intestine and then dissolve within a matter of hours.

Further, the team engineered the substance into a novel material that can coat the lining of the intestine without requiring activation by gastric acid.

The engineered compound, referred to as LuCI (Luminal Coating of the Intestine), can be made into a dry powdered form that can be encapsulated as a pill.

Also Read: Thyroid Dysfunction May Lead to Diabetes During Pregnancy

“We’ve used a bioengineering approach to formulate a pill that has good adhesion properties and can attach nicely to the gut in a preclinical model. And after a couple of hours, its effects dissipate,” Lee said.

The team is now testing the effect of short-and long-term use of LuCI in diabetic and obese rodent models. (IANS)