Thursday February 21, 2019

Study Shows that Intermittent Fasting May Up Diabetes Risk

If you are doing intermittent fasting to reduce your weight, you may be at higher risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

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Diabetes
Diabetes. Pixabay

If you are doing intermittent fasting to reduce your weight, you may be at higher risk of diabetes, a new study suggests.

The researchers found that fasting every other day to lose weight impairs the action of sugar-regulating hormone — insulin — which may increase the risk of diabetes.

The findings, presented at the Endocrinology annual meeting, ECE 2018, in Barcelona, suggest that fasting-based diets may be associated with long-term health risks and careful consideration should be made before starting such weight loss programmes.

Type-2 diabetes is a growing global epidemic that is often attributed to poor diet and a sedentary lifestyle, so is closely linked to obesity.

Blood sugar is partially regulated by the hormone insulin, which is produced by the pancreas if insulin levels are too low, or the body becomes resistant to its effects. Type-2 diabetes and high blood sugar levels can cause serious health issues, including heart, kidney and eye damage.

The findings are important due to the potential health benefits of eggs for people with pre-diabetes and Type-2 diabetes as well as the general population, the research said.
Diabetes representational image, Pixabay

“This is the first study to show that, despite weight loss, intermittent fasting diets may actually damage the pancreas and affect insulin function in normal healthy individuals, which could lead to diabetes and serious health issues,” said co-author Ana Bonassa from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil.

For the study, the researchers examined the effects of fasting every other day on the body weight, free radical levels and insulin function of normal, adult rats, over three months.

Also Read: Avoid Diabetes With Yoga, Weight Lifting

Although the rats’ body weight and food intake decreased as expected over the study period, the amount of fat tissue in their abdomen actually increased, the researcher said.

The cells of the pancreas that release insulin showed damage, with the presence of increased levels of free radicals and markers of insulin resistance were also detected, the researchers added. (IANS)

Next Story

Eating Nuts May Keep Diabetes At Bay

Nuts can keep diabetics' heart healthy

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Walnuts fight anxiety, and help you sleep better. Pixabay
Eating a handful of nuts daily, particularly tree nuts, may reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease among people with Type-2 diabetes, associated with an increased risk for high cholesterol, heart disease and stroke, say researchers, including one of Indian origin.
Tree nuts such as walnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, pistachios, pecans, macadamias, hazelnuts and pine nuts were strongly associated with reduced risk of coronary events, cardiac death and total mortality compared with peanuts.
The results showed that eating even a small amount of nuts had an effect.
While the exact biological mechanisms of nuts on heart health are unclear, researchers noted that nuts appear to improve blood sugar control, blood pressure, metabolism of fats, inflammation and blood vessel wall function.
“Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and a major cause of heart attacks, strokes and disability for people living with Type-2 diabetes,” said Prakash Deedwania, Professor at the University of California-San Francisco.
Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk
Eat Walnuts to Ward off Diabetes Risk. Pixabay
“Efforts to understand the link between the two conditions are important to prevent cardiovascular complications of Type-2 diabetes and help people make informed choices about their health,” Deedwania added.
In this study, reported in the Circulation Research journal, the team used data from 16,217 men and women before and after they were diagnosed with Type-2 diabetes.
People who increased their intake of nuts after being diagnosed with diabetes had an 11 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular disease, a 15 per cent lower risk of coronary heart disease, a 25 per cent lower risk of cardiovascular disease death, and a 27 per cent lower risk of all-cause premature death.
Each additional serving per week of total nuts was associated with a three per cent lower risk of heart disease and six per cent lower risk of heart disease death.
Adding more nuts to one’s diets proved beneficial probably at any age or stage.
“It seems never too late to improve diet and lifestyle after diagnosis among individuals with Type-2 diabetes,” the researchers said. (IANS)