Sunday June 16, 2019

International Book Fair, Indian Authors Are Set To Take The Stage at Abu Dhabi

A roster of hand-picked Indian performers will also showcase classical music, traditional dances and Punjabi folk songs.

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Among the Indian authors who will be gracing the ADIBF stage is India's Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Navdeep Suri, who will be launching his book, "Inked in Blood and Spirit of Freedom". Pixabay

Celebrated Indian authors are set to take the stage as the Abu Dhabi International Book Fair (ADIBF) opens for its 29th edition from Wednesday, the media reported on Monday.

With India as its guest of honour this year, the ADIBF will be showcasing the richness of the country’s culture, as well as its diversity, throughout the fair’s run from Wednesday to April 30 at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre, the Khaleej Times reported.

Among the Indian authors who will be gracing the ADIBF stage is India’s Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates (UAE), Navdeep Suri, who will be launching his book, “Inked in Blood and Spirit of Freedom”.

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Also on the list is Abu Dhabi-based writer Deepak Unnikrishnan, who will discuss his book “To Remember, I Invented People” that revolves around the people who raised him. Pixabay

The book serves as the English translation of his grandfather’s famous poem “Khooni Baisakhi”, which was based on how he witnessed the Jallianwala Bagh massacre on April 13, 1919.

Best-selling author Preeti Shenoy is slated to speak about her new book “Wake Up, Life Is Calling”.

Also on the list is Abu Dhabi-based writer Deepak Unnikrishnan, who will discuss his book “To Remember, I Invented People” that revolves around the people who raised him.

Smita Pant, a representative of the Indian Embassy, said: “We are thrilled to be the guest of honour at this year’s Abu Dhabi International Book Fair. This partnership is reflective of the historical ties we enjoy with the Arab world.

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The book serves as the English translation of his grandfather’s famous poem “Khooni Baisakhi”, which was based on how he witnessed the Jallianwala Bagh massacre on April 13, 1919. Pixabay

“We will be bringing a delegation of more than 100 members with us… and India will also have the biggest pavilion at this year’s event.”

Also Read: Pakistan’s Nationwide Anti-Polio Campaign Stops After Attacks on Workers

A roster of hand-picked Indian performers will also showcase classical music, traditional dances and Punjabi folk songs.

Pakistan’s Nationwide Anti-Polio Campaign Stops After Attacks on Workers
Popular pop singer Jasbir Jassi, folk music group Kutle Khan and singer-songwriter Harpreet are just some of the personalities who will be at event. (IANS)

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Reading with Your Children Can Make You a Better Parent, Say Researchers

The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5

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Toddler reading a book. Pixabay
People who regularly read with their kids are less likely to engage in harsh parenting and their children are less likely to be hyperactive and have attention problems, say researchers.
The study, published in the Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, suggests additional benefits from shared reading — a stronger parent-child bond.
“For parents, the simple routine of reading with your child on a daily basis provides not just academic but emotional benefits that can help bolster the child’s success in school and beyond,” said study lead researcher Manuel Jimenez, Assistant Professor at Rutgers University in the US.
“Our findings can be applied to programmes that help parents and care givers in underserved areas to develop positive parenting skills,” Jimenez said.
Family gathers for reading Ramayana. Image Source: The Hindu
For the study, the research team reviewed data on over 2,000 mother-child pairs from 20 large US cities in which the women were asked how often they read to their children at ages 1 and or 3.
The mothers were re-interviewed two years later, about how often they engaged in physically and/or psychologically aggressive discipline and about their children’s behaviour.
The results showed that frequent shared reading at age 1 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 3, and frequent shared reading at age 3 was associated with less harsh parenting at age 5.
Mothers who read frequently with their children also reported fewer disruptive behaviours from their children, which may partially explain the reduction in harsh parenting behaviours, said the study. (IANS)